Sentences (#26)

Not only stereotypes, but inferential processes terminating in stereotypes:

I’ve never been so disgusted with my own data,” said lead author Colin Holbrook, an anthropologist at UCLA.


During the next round of discussion on ‘The Cathedral’ substitutes, it might be worth throwing in (or up) ‘The Vomitorium’. (Although the word is bound to an unreliable legend, it turns out.)

October 9, 2015admin No Comments »

White Dindus

“Our entire history is something that’s been done to us by tricky outsiders — especially the bad stuff!”

When anybody else sounds like this, it’s rightfully categorized as pathetic whining.

ADDED: “Can we criticize (the extraordinarily large number of) Jewish Leftist freaks without going completely insane about it?”
“No! Go completely insane about it!”

October 8, 2015admin 26 Comments »

Quote note (#189)

“[C]apitalism in the ribbonfarm sense”:

Capitalism is not an ideology pursued deliberately by some to “defeat” those who live by other ideologies. It is a condition imperfectly closed societies default to in the presence of increasing choice in the environment, usually created either through the actions of outsiders or natural changes.

From a consistently thought-provoking slab of Venkatesh Rao insight porn.

(XS will try its best to get back to it.)

October 7, 2015admin 28 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy

Sounds like a plan …

If Putin was facing down Fernandez he’d have something to worry about.

ADDED: (In a spirit of scrupulous nihilistic detachment.)

ADDED: “Whether the administration was, as The Washington Post reported, “blindsided” by Russian military operations, or whether it quietly welcomed the bombing as some kind of macabre burden-sharing, Moscow’s Syrian initiative makes matters worse. As Nancy Youssef of the Daily Beast recently tweeted that she ‘overheard’ at the Pentagon, ‘Right now, we are Putin’s prison bitch.'”

October 6, 2015admin 16 Comments »


Do try to keep up:

German authorities expect up to 1.5 million asylum seekers to arrive in Germany this year, the Bild daily said in a report to be published on Monday, up from a previous estimate of 800,000 to 1 million.

Whatever it is that’s happening here should be over fairly quickly.

Also worth noting: “The authorities’ report also cited concerns that those who are granted asylum will bring their families over to Germany too, Bild said. […] Given family structures in the Middle East, this would mean each individual from that region who is granted asylum bringing an average of four to eight family members over to Germany in due course, Bild quoted the report as saying.” (So we can crank the binary exponent up by another 2-3 notches straight away.)

October 5, 2015admin 19 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Apocalypse

Chaos Patch (#82)

(Open thread + links)

Hestia’s website redesign. Blacklist. The XS pole. Lessons of aristocracy. Amerika online. Meme war. A propertarian reading list. The weekly round.

Religious roots of the Cathedral liberal elite. Aggressive sensitivity (exemplified, and also). Women broke capitalism. Academic rot.

Resilience of the Singapore provocation. How China sees Africa. “Arab Spring has predictably been an utter disaster.” Policy delirium. “I cannot overstate the damage Islam did to Western civilization.” Slaughter in SA.

Musk’s secret plan. Capitalism against commerce.

HBD blog top (actually pop) 23. Inheritance of executive function. Basics of race realism. Why the controversy? Smarts are scarce. Science-as-hate-fact.

Raspail speaks (noted, and also relevant). Death by demography. The fear. Madness in Germany (1, 2). Immigration and social order (or the opposite). The Bible on refugees.

Does religion exist? Religion and economic performance. “A part of us likes the idea of humanity ceasing to exist altogether.” Protestant Buddhism.

Climate complexity.

Great Filter nightmare fuel. Water on Mars (plus some practicalities, and a recollection). AI @ work?

Abnormal economics. McCloskey on Marxism. Assimilated futures. Meaning and pointing. Internet craziness.

October 4, 2015admin 32 Comments »
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Twitter cuts (#30)

(This might be the greatest tweet ever written.)

October 3, 2015admin 10 Comments »

Sentences (#25)

Brett Stevens interviewed by Fangorn Forest:

FF: What do you believe is the greatest problem Western Society faces today?
BS: Its imminent death.

October 2, 2015admin 19 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Sentences

The Dark Forest

Volume two of Cixin Liu’s science fiction trilogy.

The universe had once been bright, too. For a short time after the big bang, all matter existed in the, and only after the universe turned to burnt ash did heavy elements precipitate out of the darkness and form planets and life. Darkness was the mother of life and civilization.

The dark forest is the universe, but to get there — with insight — takes a path through Cosmic Sociology:

“See how the stars are points? The factors of chaos and randomness in the complex makeups of every civilized society in the universe get filtered out by distance, so those civilizations can act as reference points that are relatively easy to manipulate mathematically.”
“But there’s nothing concrete to study in your cosmic sociology, Dr. Ye. Surveys and experiments aren’t really possible.”
“That means your ultimate result will be purely theoretical. Like Euclid’s geometry, you’ll set up a few simple axioms at first, then derive an overall theoretic system using those axioms as a foundation.”
“It’s all fascinating, but what would the axioms of cosmic sociology be?”
“First: Survuival is the primary need of civilization. Second: Civilization continuously grows and expands, but the total matter in the universe remains constant.”

“Those two axioms are solid enough from a sociological perspective … but you rattled them off so quickly, like you’d already worked them out,” Luo Ji said, a little surprised.
“I’ve been thinking about this for most of my life, but I’ve never spoken about it with anyone before. I don’t know why, really. … One more thing: To derive a basic picture of cosmic sociology from these two axioms, you need two other important concepts: chains of suspicion, and the technological explosion.”

Continue Reading

October 1, 2015admin 33 Comments »
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Quote note (#188)

The model of algorithmic governance, lucidly outlined (from 2013):

The industrial revolution allowed us, for the first time, to start replacing human labor with machines on a large scale, and now we have advanced digitized factories and robotic arms that produce complex goods like automobiles all on their own. But this is only automating the bottom; removing the need for rank and file manual laborers, and replacing them with a smaller number of professionals to maintain the robots, while the management of the company remains untouched. The question is, can we approach the problem from the other direction: even if we still need human beings to perform certain specialized tasks, can we remove the management from the equation instead?

Most companies have some kind of mission statement; often it’s about making money for shareholders; at other times, it includes some moral imperative to do with the particular product that they are creating, and other goals like helping communities sometimes enter the mix, at least in theory. Right now, that mission statement exists only insofar as the board of directors, and ultimately the shareholders, interpret it. But what if, with the power of modern information technology, we can encode the mission statement into code; that is, create an inviolable contract that generates revenue, pays people to perform some function, and finds hardware for itself to run on, all without any need for top-down human direction?

(This isn’t the argument, merely the concept.)

The whole series (by Vitalik Buterin), parts 1, 2, 3. (A fourth part was promised, but I’ve not been able to find any trace of it.)

September 30, 2015admin 5 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy