Archive for January, 2016

The Deal

NRx repudiates public politics. Turn that around, and it’s the thesis: Politics happens in private.

Specifically — as a political philosophy — NRx advocates the privatization of government. It makes a public case for that, in the abstract, but only for purposes of informational and theoretical optimization. It is not, ever, doing politics in public, but only thinking about it under conditions of minimal intelligence security. Concrete execution of political strategy occurs through private deals.

The currency of such deals was formalized by Mencius Moldbug, as primary (or fungible sovereign) property. It corresponds to the conversion — whether notional or actual — of hard power into business assets. This conversion is what ‘formalism’ means. It’s an important contribution to political philosophy, and political economy, but it’s also a negotiating position.

Cries for (public) Action! will always be with us, at least until things are radically sorted out. They should be ignored. No public action is serious.

The serious thing is the deal, which substitutes for any semblance of revolution, and also for regime perpetuation. Shadow NRx — which acts outside the sphere of public visibility — is a political vulture fund. This blog does not want to know who, or what, it is. Its deep secrecy is the same as its reality. Our concern is restricted to the way it necessarily acts, in compliance with an absolute principle. We ask only: What does the deal have to be like?

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January 23, 2016admin 50 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Neoreaction
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What is the Alt-Right?

Topic of the week, it seems. XS will carve out a Chaos Patch space for targeted links on Sunday, but for impatient types, here’s a taster (1, 2, 3, 4).

This blog, I’m guessing predictably, takes a count me out position. Neoreaction, as I understand it, predicted the emergence of the Alt-Right as an inevitable outcome of Cathedral over-reach, and didn’t remotely like what it saw. Kick a dog enough and you end up with a bad-tempered dog. Acknowledging the fact doesn’t mean you support kicking dogs — or bad-tempered dogs. Maybe you’d be happy to see the dog-kicker get bitten (me too). That, however, is as far as it goes.

A short definition, that seems to me uncontroversial: The Alt-Right is the populist dissident right. Set theoretically, NRx is therefore grouped with it, but as a quite different thing. Another obvious conclusion from the definition: the Alt-Right is almost inevitably going to be far larger than NRx is, or should ever aim to be. If you think people power is basically great, but the Left have just been doing it wrong, the Alt-Right is most probably what you’re looking for (and NRx definitely isn’t).

For the Alt-Right, generally speaking, fascism is (1) basically a great idea, and (2) a meaningless slur concocted by (((Cultural Marxists))) to be laughed at. For NRx (XS version) fascism is a late-stage leftist aberration made peculiarly toxic by its comparative practicality. There’s no real room for a meeting of minds on this point.

As a consequence of its essential populism, the Alt-Right is inclined to anti-capitalism, ethno-socialism, grievance politics, and progressive statism. Its interest in geopolitical fragmentation (or Patchwork production) is somewhere between hopelessly distracted and positively hostile. Beside its — admittedly highly entertaining — potential for collapse catalysis, there’s no reason at all for the techno-commercial wing of NRx to have the slightest sympathy for it. Space for tactical cooperation, within the strategic framework of pan-secessionism, certainly exists, but that could equally be said of full-on Maoists with a willingness to break things up.

None of this should be taken as a competition for recruits. The Alt-Right will get almost all of them — it’s bound to be huge. From the NRx perspective, the Alt-Right is to be appreciated for helping to clean us up. They’re most welcome to take whoever they can, especially if they shut the door on the way out.

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January 22, 2016admin 86 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Ideology
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Quote note (#212)

John Gray on the supernaturalism of the New Atheists:

The belief that we live under some kind of supernatural guidance is not a relic of superstition that might some day be left behind but an evolutionary adaptation that goes with being human. […] It’s a conclusion that is anathema to the current generation of atheists – Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and others – for whom religion is a poisonous concoction of lies and delusion. These “new atheists” are simple souls. In their view, which derives from rationalist philosophy and not from evolutionary theory, the human mind is a faculty that seeks an accurate representation of the world. This leaves them with something of a problem. Why are most human beings, everywhere and at all times, so wedded to some version of religion? It can only be that their minds have been deformed by malignant priests and devilish power elites. Atheists have always been drawn to demonology of this kind; otherwise, they cannot account for the ­persistence of the beliefs they denounce as poisonously irrational. The inveterate human inclination to religion is, in effect, the atheist problem of evil.

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January 21, 2016admin 30 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Religion
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Twitter cuts (#45)

Throwing in another twitter-cut back-to-back, because this is perfect:


(That’s a description, not a proposal.)

January 20, 2016admin 7 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Media
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Twitter cuts (#44)

Obnoxious ‘Alt-Right’ trolling explained (well):


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January 20, 2016admin 47 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Media
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Vaguely Smart

Don Surber recalls a classic masterpiece of liberal good-think fluff (from 2008):

Historian Michael Beschloss: Yeah. Even aside from the fact of electing the first African American President and whatever one’s partisan views this is a guy whose IQ is off the charts — I mean you cannot say that he is anything but a very serious and capable leader and — you know — you and I have talked about this for years…
Imus: Well. What is his IQ?
Historian Michael Beschloss: … our system doesn’t allow those people to become President, those people meaning people THAT smart and THAT capable
Imus: What is his IQ?
Historian Michael Beschloss: Pardon?
Imus: What is his IQ?
Historian Michael Beschloss: Uh. I would say it’s probably — he’s probably the smartest guy ever to become President.
Imus: That’s not what I asked you. I asked you what his IQ was.
Historian Michael Beschloss: You know that I don’t know and I’d have to find someone with more expertise…
Imus: You don’t know.

Thanks, as always, for telling us (hazily) what we’re supposed to think.

(Via.)

January 19, 2016admin 12 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Humor
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Geopolitical Arbitrage

Stross:

… things will get very ugly in London when the Square Mile and investment banking sector ups and decamps for Frankfurt, leaving the service sector and multiethnic urban poor behind.

The specifics of this prediction are nutty, if only because mainland Europe is going down the tubes much faster than the UK, but the abstract anxiety is spot on. The globalization of the right is entirely about geopolitical arbitrage (while that of the left is about homogenizing global governance). All the critical trends point towards the exacerbation of the ‘problem’. The 21st century is the epoch of fragmentation — unlike anything seen since the early modern period — shifting power to the footloose, and away from megapolitical systems of territorial dominion. Being left behind is the rising threat, and we can confidently expect to see it consolidating as the subtext of all leftist grievance. You can’t just leave. Watch.

The obstacles to geopolitical arbitrage — i.e. spatial Exit pressure — are security constraints. It requires defensible off-shore bases (and Frankfurt most certainly isn’t going to provide one). Eyes need to be fixed firmly on secessionary dynamics (fragmentation), techno-commercial decentralization of hard security, crypto-anonymization, artificial intelligence, and the emergence of capital outposts in the Western Pacific region. More exotic factors include opportunities for radical exodus (undersea, Antarctic, and off-planet), facilitated by territorial production (artificial islands). The machinery of capture needs to keep all of these escape routes firmly suppressed in order to perpetuate itself. That simply isn’t going to happen.

Capital is learning faster than its adversaries, and has done so since it initially became self-propelling, roughly half a millennium ago. It’s allergic to socialism (obviously), and tends to flee places where socialist influence is substantially greater than zero. Unless caged definitively, eventually it breaks out. Over the next few decades — despite ever deeper encryption — it should become unmistakable which way that’s going.

January 18, 2016admin 39 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy
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Sentences (#38)

Phillip Mark McGough, writing in Quillette, buys his way in with a bald truth ticket:

After Cologne, feminism is dead.

The whole article is solid, giving clear voice to what is already a common understanding. The feminist establishment is only in derivative, flexible, and tactical opposition to extreme sexual violence against women. It consists of hardcore leftist race-politics hacks in women’s rights drag. Now everybody knows it (which is huge).

January 18, 2016admin 15 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Events
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Chaos Patch (#97)

(Open thread + links)

ACIDS. Hyperborean NRx. Limits of fascism, and nationalism. In defense of deontology. Journalism today. The weekly round.

Sell everything. The China bubble (related Marxist take). How low can oil go? Epocalypse (also). Western Spring (related). A fable for our times. The fury. Cthulhu dreaming. Thoughts on the deep state. Democracy in question. Charlie don’t surf.

The Sunni/Shia line up. Jihad in Istanbul, Jakarta, and Ouagadougou.

Who needs cash? How to make money better. Bitcoin and security. Event horizon.

More to come. The liberal agony (1, 2), and the other thing (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Tightrope walking. Taharrush. Feminism in crisis (plus, and related). The Swedish angle (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6). Lie back and think of multiculturalism. Comedy hour.

An epic (loose) trilogy from Feser on Islam and Western religion (1, 2, 3). Other Catholic responses (1, 2).

Trumpenführer panic report (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Bonus Cruz popcorn. Nuclear popcorn.

SJW target of the week. Milo was warned (plus anecdotal fluff). Twitter and free speech. The Enlightenment in ruins. Adolf is back.

Why IQ matters. Hamiltonian bees. A colorful character. A CRISPR walk-through. Genes and brains ((cautious) Steve Hsu video interview). Tesla crime-think. The welfare trait. Liberated infidelity. The liberal war on science (remember). Smoking and schizophrenia.

Galactic dark ages. Space (and 2016 stuff). Colonizing the galaxy will be hard. Difficult numbers.

How England was undone.

Time to short Penn.

Tech acceleration made simple. Split futures. The year to come in quantum computing.

Wikipedia, an appreciation. Lessons of The Illiad. On Stephenson’s Anathem, and Gibson’s ‘Agrippa’. Closing of the childhood frontier.

“A common bias among the smart is to overestimate how smart everyone else is.”

January 17, 2016admin 37 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos
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Sentences (#37)

From The Big Short (2015):

The truth is like poetry.
And most people fucking hate poetry.

January 16, 2016admin 17 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Sentences
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