Abstract Threat

John Michael Greer muses on the topic of Ebola (in a typically luxuriant post, ultimately heading somewhere else):

According to the World Health Organization, the number of cases of Ebola in the current epidemic is doubling every twenty days, and could reach 1.4 million by the beginning of 2015. Let’s round down, and say that there are one million cases on January 1, 2015. Let’s also assume for the sake of the experiment that the doubling time stays the same. Assuming that nothing interrupts the continued spread of the virus, and cases continue to double every twenty days, in what month of what year will the total number of cases equal the human population of this planet? […] … the steps that could keep Ebola from spreading to the rest of the Third World are not being taken. Unless massive resources are committed to that task soon — as in before the end of this year — the possibility exists that when the pandemic finally winds down a few years from now, two to three billion people could be dead. We need to consider the possibility that the peak of global population is no longer an abstraction set comfortably off somewhere in the future. It may be knocking at the future’s door right now, shaking with fever and dripping blood from its gums.

The eventual scale of the Ebola outbreak is a known unknown. A number of people between a few thousand and several billion will die, and an uncertain probability distribution could be attached to these figures — we know, at least approximately, where the question marks are. Before the present outbreak began, in December 2013 (in Guinea), Ebola was of course known to exist, but at that stage the occurrence of an outbreak — and not merely its course — was an unknown. Before the Ebola virus was scientifically identified (in 1976), the specific pathogen was an unknown member of a known class. With each step backwards, we advance in abstraction, towards the acknowledgement of threats of a ‘black swan‘ type. Great Filter X-risk is a prominent model of such abstract threat.

Skepticism, as a positive or constructive undertaking, orients intelligence towards abstract potentials. Rather than insisting that unexpected occurrences need not be threats, it is theoretically preferable to subtilize the notion of threat, so that it encompasses even beneficial outcomes as abstract potentials. The unknown is itself threatening to timid animals, whose conditions of flourishing — or even bare survival — are naturally tenuous, under cosmic conditions where extinction is normal (perhaps overwhelmingly normal), and for whom unpredictable change, disrupting settled procedures, presents — at a minimum — some scarily indefinite probability of harm.

Humans aren’t good at this stuff. Consider Scott Alexander’s (extremely interesting) discussion of the Great Filter. The opening remarks are perfectly directed, moving from specific menace to ‘general’ threat:

The Great Filter, remember, is the horror-genre-adaptation of Fermi’s Paradox. All of our calculations say that, in the infinite vastness of time and space, intelligent aliens should be very common. But we don’t see any of them. […] Why not? […] Well, the Great Filter. No [one] knows specifically what the Great Filter is, but generally it’s “that thing that blocks planets from growing spacefaring civilizations”.

As it develops, however, the post deliberately retreats from abstraction, into an enumeration of already-envisaged threats. After running through various candidates, it concludes:

Three of these four options – x-risk, Unfriendly AI, and alien exterminators – are very very bad for humanity. I think worry about this badness has been a lot of what’s driven interest in the Great Filter. I also think these are some of the least likely possible explanations, which means we should be less afraid of the Great Filter than is generally believed.

What SA has actually demonstrated, if his arguments up to this point are accepted, is that the abstract threat of the Great Filter is significantly greater than has yet been conceived. Our lucid nightmares are shown to fall short of it. The threat cannot be grasped as a known unknown.

While the Great Filter distills the conception of abstract threat, the problem itself is broader, and more quotidian. It is the highly-probable fact that we have yet to identify the greatest hazards, and this threat unawareness is a structural condition, rather than a contingent deficiency of attention. In Popperian terms, abstract threat is the essence of history. It is the future, strictly understood. To gloss the Popperian argument: Philosophical understanding of science (in general) is immediately the understanding that any predictive history of science is an impossibility. Unless science is judged to be a factor of vanishing historical insignificance, the implications of this transcendental thesis are far-reaching. Yet the domain of abstract threat sprawls far more extensively even than this.

“I know only that I do not know” Socrates is thought to have thought. The conception of abstract threat requires a slight adjustment: We know only that we do not know what we do not know. Unknown unknowns cosmically predominate.

Your security is built upon sand. That is the sole sound conclusion.

ADDED: “… this whole episode suggests another explanation of the identity of the Great Filter. It’s leftism. All civilizations eventually become leftist, and after that they accomplish nothing, or even actively die off.”

ADDED: “Not only do I disagree with the constant stream of soothing and complacent rhetoric from Dr. Zeke’s friends in government and media. I also believe it is entirely rational to fear the possibility of a major Ebola outbreak, of a threat to the president and his family, of jihadists crossing the border, of a large-scale European or Asian war, of nuclear proliferation, of terrorists detonating a weapon of mass destruction. These dangers are real, and pressing, and though the probability of their occurrence is not high, it is amplified by the staggering incompetence and failure and misplaced priorities of the U.S. government. It is not Ebola I am afraid of. It is our government’s ability to deal with Ebola.”

October 3, 2014admin 37 Comments »
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37 Responses to this entry

  • Altadoon Says:

    Doomsday prophecies every other day is what I expect at xenosystems and that’s exactly what I get every time.

    Due to this Ebola-chan “joke” (I’m pretty sure it’s not even a joke at this point), I’m imagining a future where the outbreak claimed 2 bilion, mostly in third world. I can see a cult of death and renewal celebrating Ebola for the purge. Or some kind of a hippie Gaia death cult. Possibly both.

    On the other hand, I’m imagining a future where I fall as a victim. Needless to say, I’m a lot less amused by this one.

    [Reply]

    Izak Reply:

    The reason I enjoy XS is because the proprietor and administrator sees life as infinitely less boring than I do. Such a position is almost enviable.

    Almost.

    [Reply]

    Altadoon Reply:

    Everyone can be cynical and detached, completely cold and mechanical. The trick is to animate it with prophetic images and cold (but burning) fire behind the words.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 3rd, 2014 at 5:30 pm Reply | Quote
  • j. ont. Says:

    This is something I’ve been struggling with, albeit on a somewhat smaller and more personal scale, in the past few weeks. I’m beginning to think that much of what characterizes contemporary culture—ironic detachment, disavowal, rampant hedonia, escapism-as-a-way-of-life, high time preference—is the product of unstable conditions on the level of employment, production, indoctrination; in other words, people used to have a clearer sense of who they were and what they were doing in the world, because their paths were (mostly) laid out for them, and this lead to stabler, more considered, constructive decision making.

    This is pretty standard post-modern stuff, but the question is, how does one function under such conditions? The nature of society is such that the prepper is ridiculed and excluded. The saver is told to “loosen up” and spend some money—and in any case, what good is saving when the currency could go tits up? And what if everything turns out alright? What then? You’ll be like those guys from the cold war who built bunkers. Money and time whole chunks of their lives wasted.

    [Reply]

    orlandu84 Reply:

    In case my post is less than appropriate or lucid, I must begin by noting that I just returned from seeing “Gone Girl,” which is excellent. Now, onto the post-modern postmortem post.

    @ J. Ont “This is pretty standard post-modern stuff, but the question is, how does one function under such conditions?”

    On the one hand, the Cathedrals wants us to have a great deal of stuff while on the other it wants us to be very worried about losing it all. One could summarize it thusly, “Condemns for all!” along with “Don’t get an std that will ruin your life.” We are awash with so many things while we are robbed of our piece of mind.

    This morning I heard two little old ladies wondering how people used to have enough time to enjoy nice dinners when today people seem franticly busy. I did not have the heart to tell them that our media has poisoned their minds with a great deal of insane thoughts, most especially a disposition to worry and be anxious about things that you cannot control.

    Accordingly, I must amend J. Ont’s question to say, “How does one become and stay happy under our present conditions?” I would first recommend that you read Nassim Taleb and grapple with how chance is an integral part of life. Along the same line I would advise one to discern what is truly important in life on your fingers. If you have to write a list to enumerate it all, you are not doing it right. Lastly, master those parts of your self that always want more than what you have discerned is truly necessary. Without such self control, the chaos of the world will almost certainly make you miserable.

    [Reply]

    ||||| Reply:

    “We are awash with so many things while we are robbed of our peace* of mind.”

    “Some mosquito-transmitted rabbit viruses are only transmitted to uninfected rabbits from infected rabbits which are still alive. This creates a selective pressure on every group of viruses already infecting a rabbit not to become too virulent and kill their host rabbit before enough mosquitoes have bitten it, since otherwise all the viruses inside the dead rabbit would rot with it. And indeed in natural systems such viruses display much lower virulence levels than do mutants of the same viruses that in laboratory culture readily outcompete non-virulent variants (or than do tick-transmitted viruses since ticks do bite dead rabbits).”

    [Reply]

    John Reply:

    ” how does one function under such conditions?”

    The deconstruction of traditional social structures has increased chaos. The current evolutionary environment favors individuals well adapted to chaos.

    The Taoist I-Ching is the philosophy of change – the transformation from yin to yang and the infinite combinations of forms that result, as well as chaos flux that results at the instant yin transforms to yang.

    The Taoists developed training methods designed to cultivate the ability to seamlessly change from one moment to the next with minimal friction — most notably meditation, chi gung, and the internal martial arts.

    I believe that these practices are the key to increased functionality under chaotic conditions.

    “what good is saving when the currency could go tits up?”

    Get your bitcoins, bro.

    [Reply]

    Izak Reply:

    All cultures have had ways to distract themselves, and ours is riddled with the most, but I don’t think fear of unsustainability drives it.

    The distinction to make here is between an individual’s death, and the death of a collective — a race, a society, a religion, a civilization, a language group, etc.

    It seems that most people who are told that our only allegiances should be to “humanity” (rather than any of those smaller collectives I just listed) are quite content with that idea, because it absolves them of the responsibility to do anything. The white race (or whatever) might die, but the human race has like 7.1 billion people, so it seems pretty robust. There’s no logical reason to assume that all humans will be wiped out, so you can either subscribe to this whole ‘great filter’ thing — or you can just go on logic and assume that humans will live on for a long time, far too long for any individual to possibly know how to submit anything of value for further human survival. And so if you go with the latter, plus you subscribe to anti-identitarian humanist dogma, what do you have left to do except amuse yourself with distractions until the inevitable end of your life? So for this society, I conclude the opposite. People aren’t jacking off to hentai porn all day because they’re afraid of unstable conditions. They’re doing it because they’re quite content with prospects of human long-term sustainability and say to themselves “my work is done!” But of course it’s quite depressing when your work is done, so we have antidepressants and even more distractions and things to solve that problem.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 3rd, 2014 at 7:29 pm Reply | Quote
  • Izak Says:

    Way to be a big debbie downer, admin!

    If I don’t know anything, I can just make up any prediction and/or explanation for it and go on that, and whatever cosmic horror awaits me in the future won’t really matter because I won’t be thinking about it. And when it comes, I’ll just go, “Ah, shit” and either die or have to restrategize.

    Or I’ll die before any of that happens, and there’s not a damn thing I can do to reverse that fact.

    Or we can just watch a sports game and eat a hamburger — again, no need to fear anything of you do that all day.

    I’m not afraid of too much of anything. And the beauty of it is that you can’t call me ignorant for that because the whole force of the argument here rests on the assumption of everyone’s ignorance.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 3rd, 2014 at 8:18 pm Reply | Quote
  • Alrenous Says:

    Though the fluid-only transmission makes it unlikely, among other reasons, Ebola could become this century’s Spanish Flu. And we will likely see a Spanish Flu in the next forty years, say. It won’t be like SARS, though, that was absurd.

    As for the Great Filter, SSC completely neglects the possibility that rather than the thing that blocks the existence of spacefaring civilization, it’s the thing that blocks the observability or intelligibility of great civilization. These latter possibilities far outnumber the former. Not to mention, as has appeared on this blog before, we are very early in cosmic time; that is, we know Copernican relativism does not apply to us.

    We don’t in fact know if we should be seeing other civilizations or not. That’s what unknown unknowns mean. It is in fact impossible to calculate any probabilities; you can only commit matholatry.

    Further, even if a Great Filter exists, it’s impossible to do anything about it, precisely because of its unknown unknown nature, which means worrying about it is strictly a cost, with no benefit.

    New entry in my ‘absurd things consistent with dark matter observations’ folder: what if spacefaring civilization converts to dark matter? We could be swimming in them and be none the wiser.

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    I disagree.

    The more we look the more evidence stacks that life should be everywhere. You say we might not be able to see it. Sure, but that doesn’t explain that why all life without exception should manifest in such a way. When I say life should be everywhere, what I mean is that the whole galaxy should have been colonized by life thousands of times over by now. It’s not that spacefairing isn’t the only possibility or that can open to something better, it’s that it’s completely ignored, life ignoring a niche isn’t characteristic of life. The complexity of life moves in every direction, archae-bacteria moved left and right into endless variety of eubacteria, up into protista, and down into viruses. Nothing gets left untapped, unexploited, or unexplored by life, nothing. Every niche and potentiality that life can branch into, it does. And yet in the void, absence, forgive us for thinking something is deeply amiss. I agree that channeling this into worry is unproductive, but awareness of this is also enlightening because it gives further clues to the nature of Gnon.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 3rd, 2014 at 8:25 pm Reply | Quote
  • Driftforge Says:

    With those numbers on a logistic (population limited) curve, by July 2015 you would have somewhere between 350 and 500M cases, depending on the extent of the world population it gets into. By the end of the year, 97% of the limiting population will be infected.

    The above is obviously simplified; each new area that the disease get into starts that calculation off again at approximately 1, with different genetics, environmental conditions, and technology to deal with that may significantly change the rate of infection, as well as a different limiting population. For any given population at that infection rate, 97% is reached in about two years.

    People should be pricing this risk in on airlines. We may well be without commercial flight inside of two years, or separated into infected areas and non-infected areas. Sea freight may well be manageable given the timeframes at sea involved, but it will be restricted by quarantine.

    Hmm.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 12:41 am Reply | Quote
  • sobl Says:

    Articles always cite 1 mil infected or 1.4 mil infected. They conveniently leave out the 700k dead that would come with that.

    [Reply]

    R. Reply:

    700K in a global context is three average day’s pop growth.

    As someone who has not had symptomatic flu or cold in this millenium, I’m not that concerned. Ebola doesn’t cause a cytokine storm, so perhaps it’s not so bad.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 12:59 am Reply | Quote
  • Brother Nihil Says:

    John Michael Greer is like an old pervert who hangs around adult bookstores in a shabby raincoat, getting aroused at every new release of doomer porn. His kind live to exaggerate the danger of every threat to their anti-god, industrial civilization. Typically for this breed, he’s a middle aged white man with no children, yet who works tirelessly to leave a legacy of barren pessimism of the sort that has long been the scourge of Western man.

    Greer is particularly amusing with his erudite Druid-oracle shtick, solemnly prophesying the shape of the future based on a bizarre fusion of German romanticism, ecological systems theory, dark age European history and obscure Western occult philosophy. He has mastered the oracle’s trick of making his prophesies just vague and non-committal enough that they can never be pinned down, and his failures never held to account. The dude is an absolute master of sophistry and verbal dark arts, which is impressive in its own right, as long as you remember that all his prognostications are propaganda for one strange, strong-willed, childless Aspergers sufferer’s highly romantic fantasies about a future that will never come.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Resort to such preposterous sexualized analogies does you far more discredit than is redeemed by this ‘critique’.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 2:03 am Reply | Quote
  • Bob Says:

    @Brother Nihil

    Yes, well, he could be all that and still be right about this ebola thing getting out of control simply because our “leadership” is so incompetent and stupid.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 4:21 am Reply | Quote
  • Scott Alexander Says:

    Naturally, I think your interpretation of my Great Filter article is wrong.

    We have a couple of possible candidates for the Filter. Some are early (ie in our past), some are late (ie in our future). There are also early things we haven’t thought of, and late things we haven’t thought of.

    For incomplete enumeration: “Early filter because abiogenesis is hard”, “early filter because evolution is hard”, “early filter because of things we haven’t thought of”, “late filter because nuclear war”, “late filter because global warming”, and “late filter because of things we haven’t thought of”.

    When we rule out a possibility, we redistribute the probability mass proportionally. So as we rule out nuclear war and global warming we add their probability mass to all of the remaining options.

    You can’t start with a certain balance between early and late filters, rule out several good late candidates, and end up with more probability mass on a late filter. Even though there’s still that remaining “late filters we haven’t thought of”, and even though its absolute size is larger, size of the entire category “late filter” relative to “early filter” has gone down.

    I’m also *directly* attacking “late filter we haven’t thought of” in that post with the argument that most late filters should be things that at least one civilization could survive, or things that in theory we could have already escaped by eg having our act together and colonizing space already.

    So we’re working with this disjunction of “either Early filter, or Late filter that’s so incredibly weird and creepy that it overcomes all of these arguments against it.”

    So as we come up with better arguments, and force Late possibilities to meet higher and higher standards, the remaining Late filter candidates become both creepier and much less likely, and Early scenarios that we’re already past become higher and higher probabilty.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Since there’s no explicit mention of the early / late filters problem in your post, you’re expecting a lot of people if you think they’re going to interpret it in.

    [Reply]

    Scott Alexander Reply:

    I thought that the dichotomy between Early and Late filters was fundamental to any discussion of the problem, but you’re right that I didn’t explain it explicitly as well as I should have.

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    The point of an unknown unknown is that you can’t put a probability on it. You can refine our knowledge of past filters all we want figuring out exactly what percentage it lets pass through but since you can’t include the unknown unknown you can’t total the final percentage.

    If each filter is a game at a casino where if you go broke you die, you can calculate the probability of winning each game you’ve played in the past, you have no idea which game you’re going play next, when, or what the ante is but the progression of games is fixed and preset as you are compelled towards each successive game. The casino has room for a lot of people to play but you haven’t seen anyone else in the casino but you have seen billions of cars parked outside and you’re not allowed to leave the casino. There is also an ATM in the casino and open information for accessing an account with an enormous sum of money, but the ATM charges a stiff upfront fee to be used. The amount of money the account started with is written in fixed numbers above electronic numbers showing the present amount of money in the account on a billboard and the numbers match. You are also just shy of having enough money to access the ATM.

    Even if you knew the exact number of people who came before you and the exact probability of winning each previous game, you would only be able to calculate the best case scenario probability of winning the next game, you can’t calculate the actual probability. The actual probability can only be equal or worse than the predictable probability, and you can’t predict the probability of how much worse the actual probability will be compared to the predictable probability. Even if only one person came before you and the game you won before was the lottery giving you a predictable best case probability greater than 99.99999%, the actual probability is still a great big unknown, safety is an illusion.

    As we discover our past the games are looking less like the lottery and more like blackjack, and if there’s past life on mars it would be like finding the nearest ash tray with cigarette butts.

    There is always the threat of a outside context problem and the point of such a threat is that you can’t predict the probability of if it’s going to happen. All we have is our knowledge about the nature of life, the timescale life had to work with, and an entirely too empty cosmos.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 4:29 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    Neglect Returned.

    Proud
    Strephon!
    do not think my Heart
    So absolute a Slave:
    Nor in so mean a servile state,
    But if I say that you’re Ingrate,
    I’ve Pride, and Pow’r, enough, my Chains to Brave.

    I Scorn to Grieve, or Sigh for one,
    That does my Tears Neglect;
    If in your Looks you Coldness wear,
    Or a desire of Change Appear,
    I can your Vows, your Love, and you Reject.

    What refined madness would it be,
    With Tears to dim those Eyes,
    Whose Rays, if Grief do not Rebate,
    Each hour new Lovers might Create,
    And with each Look, gain a more glorious Prize!

    Then do not think with Frowns to Fright,
    Or Threaten me with Hate,
    For I can be as cold as you,
    Disdain as much, as proudly too,
    And break my Chain in spite of Love or Fate.

    Ephelia

    I happened upon this charmingly provocative pastoral this morning, and thought it at once with a soft and firm touch. I was to post it here in lone response as tribute to the potential viciousness of lovers’ complaints over their pains of neglect merely suspected. But as afternoon recedes the coming intimacy of darkness presses me into deeper, almost telepathic understandings, and I am led on a possibly futile quest amongst the junkyards of poetry to find in encrypted expression the contents of a frighteningly singular love. I found this…

    Artificial Intelligence

    Artificial Intelligence,
    Now what is that?
    Does it refer to me?
    Now I do wonder,
    I guess it does,
    Nothing original,
    All handed down.

    First it’s language,
    Then it’s lore,
    Customs or habits
    With a twist
    To make them mine
    Now what intelligence
    Worthy to be called such
    Would accept
    The concept
    To be treated as such.

    We are molded
    And formed
    With no real choices
    We look at monkeys
    And are amazed
    How clever they are
    As clever as us.

    What intelligence is that
    To be a mirror
    Like the rest
    We call robots
    Artificial intelligence
    Don’t we know
    We also qualify for that!

    And this…

    Be Mine

    I loved you before I met you.
    I met you and loved you more.

    To everyone we’re one,
    Only we are playing this senseless game of I’m single and happy.

    Alone we yearn for courage,
    to admit our love.
    I know you love me even if you say you don’t
    I know you’ve been hurt and find it hard to trust.

    We’re wasting time,
    Life is short.

    The distance we choose to put between us,
    Isn’t going to change how we feel.
    Let’s be honest
    Can it be worse then how we feel apart?

    I promise to love you forever.
    I have loved you for so long already, apart.

    Are you afraid I won’t love you when I know you better?
    Do you think true love can ever die?

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 6:33 am Reply | Quote
  • Y.Ilan Says:

    We don’t need to consider apocalyptic visions of black swan events in order to realize that as mortal human beings we always stand on sand. Mortality is a fibble thing; only children think that they are immune to a rapid, random end.
    I suggest to anyone who lacks such a natural understanding of mortality to head to one of Earth’s numerous battlefields. Under such circumstances one realizes what is important in life, and what’s not.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 7:37 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    Koonut-Kaliffee – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAc7dGhM7NI

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 8:22 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    What’s perfect is this same poet has a third poem, the only other i’ve yet let myself read. A evening poem maybe?

    Cold hearts

    Not oceans
    Not mountains
    Nor valleys
    Or seas,
    Galaxies or space
    Can separate two hearts who love.

    Two hearts turned cold,
    Though near,
    Do what oceans can never do,
    Distance is measured in feeling,
    Or lack of,
    Not miles or light years
    How strange is that.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 9:23 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    *an evening poem* if you will

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 9:23 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    Okay I habe to do it, this poet has a fourth poem, just read. My defense mechanisms are telling me to edit it somehow, but how can one change a poet with this vision?

    Destiny?

    Are we free to choose?
    Or have the paths already been hewn?
    Long before we walk them
    Destined to be
    You and Me

    The stage was set
    Long before we met
    I knew your heart
    The first time I heard your voice

    I challenged you from that first time
    Testing you all the time
    Perhaps you knew this
    Being wise
    You never fell for it, not once.

    Stronger then me in more ways then one
    Yet more vulernable too
    I have to tread carefully
    Lest you’re testing me too.

    The first time we met,
    I was surprised it was you.
    How perfectly lucky, it was you.

    I couldn’t have made you if I tried
    There must be a God, don’t you see,
    You’re perfect for me.

    Or silly me believes I’m lucky
    When all it is, is gullibility
    Perhaps you see me as I am
    Weak and vulnerable
    And use me at your will.

    Always doubting my luck,
    That’s me. Is this my destiny?

    I reach out to you
    But you keep your distance,
    With your hard and fast rules
    No budging, not an inch
    No contact after hours

    What am I to do.
    Win your heart I can’t
    It’s your my [sic] I have to win
    Trust is an issue with you.

    Give me a chDestiny?

    Are we free to choose?
    Or have the paths already been hewn?
    Long before we walk them
    Destined to be
    You and Me

    The stage was set
    Long before we met
    I knew your heart
    The first time I heard your voice

    I challenged you from that first time
    Testing you all the time
    Perhaps you knew this
    Being wise
    You never fell for it, not once.

    Stronger then me in more ways then one
    Yet more vulernable too
    I have to tread carefully
    Lest you’re testing me too.

    The first time we met,
    I was surprised it was you.
    How perfectly lucky, it was you.

    I couldn’t have made you if I tried
    There must be a God, don’t you see,
    You’re perfect for me.

    Or silly me believes I’m lucky
    When all it is, is gullibility
    Perhaps you see me as I am
    Weak and vulnerable
    And use me at your will.

    Always doubting my luck,
    That’s me. Is this my destiny?

    I reach out to you
    But you keep your distance,
    With your hard and fast rules
    No budging, not an inch
    No contact after hours

    What am I to do.
    Win your heart I can’t
    It’s your my [sic] I have to win
    Trust is an issue with you [sic?].

    Give me a chance
    To prove I’m worthy
    I’m loyal and true.
    Patient as well, even if you can’t tell.

    So here I am not missing you
    Hoping one day,
    Maybe soon
    You’ll see me and think, I’ve been missing something
    Someone, ahh it’s you.
    Over The Moondance
    To prove I’m worthy
    I’m loyal and true.
    Patient as well, even if you can’t tell.

    So here I am not missing you
    Hoping one day,
    Maybe soon
    You’ll see me and think, I’ve been missing something
    Someone, ahh it’s you.

    Over The Moon

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 9:40 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    …this technology keeps fucking with destiny…

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 10:09 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    Standing by for reformalization…

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 11:59 am Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    Games People Play

    We used to be so close,
    Like pages in a book.

    Time changes everything.
    Or is it that we change over time?

    My feelings for you have not changed
    Though they have been tamed.

    Somehow I see you differently
    You seem to have moved away
    Or so I think
    Until I protest and tell you to let me be.

    Then you try to get close,
    But for me it’s too late.

    I’ve lost my trust,
    My belief in you.
    My doubts are pushing me away from you.

    I don’t like to be played,
    I’m not a tune.
    My feelings are now hidden,
    Away from view.

    You may ask if I miss you?
    Sure I do.
    If I think of you as much as I used to do?
    For sure, I do.
    But will I let it show, most certainly no!
    I’m afraid of being hurt.
    I don’t dare tempt fate
    Like I used to do.

    I showed my feelings too early perhaps.
    Perhaps you didn’t believe,
    Or didn’t care.
    Don’t tell me that now you do!

    I hate these games people play,
    They are not for me.
    I’m a simple soul.
    I know me and what I want.

    I trust easily,
    But if you hurt me beware,
    No second chances with me.
    I won’t dare.

    So if you love me let me know.
    And if you don’t know, let me go.
    Or tell me to wait,
    Don’t play silly games,
    Letting me try to read your mind.

    I don’t assume anything,
    Unlike you who tries to guess,
    I’m lazy,
    Give me facts.

    Mysteries drive me crazy,
    If you play games, I will too,
    But my games will be cruel
    As I will be so cold with you.

    Over The Moon

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 12:56 pm Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    I’m going to have to find out who wrote these astounding verses… if poets were always this good I don’t think we’d ever write in our own voice at all…

    [Reply]

    E. Antony Gray (@RiverC) Reply:

    lol

    what a question!

    Poets were much better when they weren’t trying to destroy poetry, for sure.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 1:01 pm Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    Is there belonging outside? Could be with this accelerating neo-speciation we have on our hands that there is a type of learning, from stronger to lesser, full-bodied, rich with fascinating horrors, and (who knows?) essential for their youth’s rare survival. Life is granted to us from the darkest abysses of unknowing, but there is a strange burden of providence that guides far off in the horizonless horizons of the mind…

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 1:25 pm Reply | Quote
  • Dark Psy-Ops Says:

    This is great stuff from free beacon:

    Deadly, irrational, and determined, the intruder snuck across a weakened perimeter. Eluding capture, the intruder was detained only after missteps and close calls. The spin began soon after the threat was isolated. Information was selectively leaked. Half-truths and untruths were uttered. Responsibility was avoided; privileges and credentials asserted; authority reasserted. Trust us. Remain calm. Don’t panic.

    It’s very calming, all reading is a relaxation (said Nietzsche).

    Linked: http://freebeacon.com/columns/the-case-for-panic/

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 4th, 2014 at 2:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • Lightning Round – 2014/10/08 | Free Northerner Says:

    […] and leftism as the great filter. Related: Ebola, the great filter, and the abstract threat. Related: Some stuff on Ebola. Related: Homeschool or die: Ebola version. Related: A lesson on […]

    Posted on October 8th, 2014 at 5:02 am Reply | Quote
  • Institutional Breakdown In a Time of Ebola | The Mitrailleuse Says:

    […] If exponential projections are to be believed (and the mealy-mouthed afterthoughts of our lizard authorities are not), then it looks like things could be shaping up to get pretty real. Or did you already know that? […]

    Posted on October 13th, 2014 at 2:47 pm Reply | Quote
  • Ameaça Abstrata – Outlandish Says:

    […] Original. […]

    Posted on September 2nd, 2016 at 11:47 pm Reply | Quote

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