Chaos Patch (#10)

I’m seconds away from embarking upon True Detective — highly psyched. [First episode was — indeed — awesome. So far, in the running for the best TV show ever.]

Much other chaos (including shoggoth, crypto-currencies, and child management).

So Chaos Patch …

ADDED: How about telling me what we’re not talking about enough?

ADDED: Among the things provoking thought at my end right now, are shoggothic modernity, and block-chain governance. (I’m trying to keep them from running into each other too much, too quickly.)

ADDED: Hugely enjoyed butting in on the PAF event — not a vast amount of shoggothism, but a delightful opportunity to chat with some thoughtful people about time, capital, artificial intelligence, and what the hell is this neoreaction bullshit (?).

April 4, 2014admin 61 Comments »
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61 Responses to this entry

  • RiverC Says:

    I’m all for re-engineering the language, as some of y’all were twittering about this morning (must be evening for you.)

    Diversity is a complex word because it never really had a positive connotation. It did not ever mean ‘variety’, it meant ‘lack of cohesion’, a variety that results from things not being unified. That being said, one might be amused to note that lexically “Unity” is the opposite of “Diversity”. The root word is the same as ‘division’ and ‘divisive’. Diversity is the result of divisions and/or divisiveness. (The better joke is, “the opposite of Diversity is University”)

    Equality, Justice, Freedom, etc. are easy, big targets. We know that ‘social justice’ really is a euphemism for otherkin mob coercion, and ‘freedom’ is often used with a hanging descriptor (listen to any 60’s song that uses it and tell me “freedom” doesn’t have an implied “to do drugs and have lots of sex”) Equality is also very open for de-construction and reconstruction (someone already suggested ‘Equity’, and I would suggest a meaning more like ‘Peerage’.)

    On the other hand, I like using the term “The Diversity”. It’s my current favorite euphemism.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 3:36 pm Reply | Quote
  • admin Says:

    “.. the opposite of Diversity is University” — so Antiversity = diversity. (“Oh Moldbug, you vibrant old dog …”)

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 4:36 pm Reply | Quote
  • RiverC Says:

    @admin

    The Orthodox joke goes, “Is that anti-versity or ante-versity?”

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 6:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • Bryce Laliberte Says:

    Religion.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 6:48 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mike Says:

    “How about telling me what we’re not talking about enough?”

    The role of status competition in causing the cathedral to exist in the first place. This is something Moldbug never really got, or at least he never wrote about it (possibly he thought it too obvious to bother writing much about).

    [Reply]

    Peter A. Taylor Reply:

    Have you read any Robert Frank?

    http://www.amazon.com/Choosing-Right-Pond-Behavior-Status/dp/0195049454

    [Reply]

    nydwracu Reply:

    Moldbug chalks it up to competition for spoils.

    Here we see competition for spoils in its earliest stages.

    The crucial factor that determines the success or failure of each player is the choices made by the other participants in the game, that is, the other parents. Everyone therefore watches carefully what the neighbours are doing. If most people make the same choice it will produce a self-reinforcing process, or a ‘cascade’ in Laitin’s terminology. This will create a critical mass behind the one or the other language which in its turn may decisively influence the outcome of the power struggle at the elite level.

    Was it like this during the formation of the Cathedral, with everyone watching carefully what the neighbors are doing? Maybe, maybe not — or maybe not consciously

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 7:42 pm Reply | Quote
  • survivingbabel Says:

    ADDED: How about telling me what we’re not talking about enough?

    Understanding organizational behavior, as a prerequisite for either institution- or intentional society-building. It’s great that so many people are gung ho about hierarchy, but there appears to be a decided lack of experience from people in hierarchical leadership positions, and almost no thought at all about how one goes about creating an organization of humans able to achieve group goals.

    When I said the other day that I thought NRx “theoretical space” is getting saturated, I more specifically mean “founding theory and ideology.” In other words, if all we do is bitch about Cthulhu and pine for better days (either behind or ahead), we are resigning ourselves to spectator status. I of course do not advocate engagement as a strategy, but we at least need to be doing our own thing, in dark and musty corners, with an eye towards preparation.

    [Reply]

    RiverC Reply:

    One pet theory I have about hierarchy is that it must constitute at least three parties. So leader + followers is not a hierarchy.

    [Reply]

    Nick B. Steves Reply:

    At least three you say. Hmmm…

    [Reply]

    Nick B. Steves Reply:

    The NRx could really use more ex-mils and preppers. The WNs would ordinarily be a good a decent source for this, but we haven’t come down on the Jews hard enough yet.

    [Reply]

    Handle Reply:

    My prediction is that this is exactly what is going to happen, alas.

    The middle-brow gutter-dwellers of these movements will be attracted to NRx like a magnet because they are looking for some smart people who seem to be able to provide an intellectually respectable veneer to their hateful nonsense. And then insight-producing discourse will stagnate and cease as all conversation orbits around complaints about the Joos, blacks, skank whores, etc.

    Even people who are entirely sympathetic to these points of view will tire of, and be turned off by, the inevitably juvenile level of conversation and insult-swapping. And so everybody with talent who wants to spend their time learning, thinking, and doing something more productive will go someplace else with a much higher signal-to-noise ratio.

    R.I.P. NRx, hello some rebranded next step … someday.

    [Reply]

    fotrkd Reply:

    R.I.P. NRx, hello some rebranded next step … someday.

    You say that like it’s a bad thing, rather than a natural migration. Dynamic geography can only work physically if people are prepared to make the same mental leaps. NRx? Three little letters – is it really worth being so precious about? Carve out the good stuff – split – and leave the carcass to be picked over. The whole problem with Cathedral structures is the refusal to do any such thing.

    James Reply:

    R.I.P. NRx, hello some rebranded next step … someday.

    An alternative interpretation is that the powers that be in America don’t want any kind of critic, and form whatever false beliefs facilitate this goal. They have demonstrated their extremely poor ability to form accurate beliefs about me, in particular—I don’t care whether you think I’m a liar—and general sliminess.

    My affective response to threatening innuendo, harassment and invasive surveillance is the same as your reaction would be if I came to your house and knocked out your wife’s teeth. I don’t view this as their prerogative. I have some commonsense beliefs in this context.

    I can’t threaten these people and in abstract terms I would prefer not to. I do mean to tell them that I doubt everything they say, I shall exercise free speech as I see fit, and finally that in my probability estimate, some kinds of unreasonable behaviour are also irrational.

    Ex-pat in Oz Reply:

    Unless what these migrants experience is more ultimately satisfying than what they arrived with. You’re ascribing no agency to this group– what if NRx proves more consistent and wholesome than their current diet? What excites me about NRx/DE is how it makes lost thinking accessible again. I think it was Dennis Miller who observed that if the only item on the Eslimo menu is seal meat, that’s what they’ll expect.

    Why wouldn’t WN migrants to NRx/DE upgrade their thinking rather than bring the conversation down?

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 8:26 pm Reply | Quote
  • Hurlock Says:

    Economics.
    First of all, in my opinion this remains the Cathedral’s weakest point. It’s just very hard to argue against numbers (any other criticism is easily deflected through ideological signals). Plus, an extensive discussion of economics is key to further developing neocameralism. And of course, (very closely related) I’d like to see more stuff from you on catallaxy.
    Basically almost everthing mentioned in this post:
    http://www.xenosystems.net/economic-ends/#more-1929

    Btw, I think a lot of people in NRx ought to read more Mises (for starters). I sense a lot of misunderstanding about what economics, concieved as the study of human action, actually is.

    [Reply]

    Antisthenean Reply:

    I haven’t read Mises and am far too time-poor (research) to plunge into him now. Perhaps you could indulge me in a casual summary of what you find most interesting/significant in Mises?

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 8:48 pm Reply | Quote
  • Alex Says:

    NRX TV

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLR0BYrgunYv51s2vxsCrkfu3NjgF3gOxk&v=pe7PkMTuC0E

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 9:51 pm Reply | Quote
  • Nick B. Steves Says:

    Another thing we’re not talking enough about: occult mind-control.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 9:55 pm Reply | Quote
  • j. ont. Says:

    To what extent might Gnon be mobilized as a solution (though that’s a misleading word) to nihilism? Someone touched upon this a while ago in the comments: so God is dead, at least culturally—so how do we recover the benefits of a belief in God?

    Also, just curious—has there been any dialogue between Buddhism and NRx? What are the confluences? What are the oppositions? Obviously wester secular Buddhism is very SWPL, but what about the real deal?

    [Reply]

    Antisthenean Reply:

    I have an active interest in both, but from my view Buddhism is too apolitical and not frenetic enough to tie into NRx (although who knows, Laliberte has managed to make his papist project at least coherent). Buddhism isn’t at cross-purposes to NRx, but I’d say it’s definitely orthogonal to it.

    Re the God question: the transhumanists and singularitarians have the only thing close to a viable ‘recovery’ of a transcendental god-figure in the 21st century.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2014 at 11:45 pm Reply | Quote
  • Peter A. Taylor Says:

    Religion? Organizational behavior? Recovering the benefits thereof?

    Here’s an Anthony Gill “Research on Religion” podcast with Michael McBride talking about the Mormon church.

    http://www.researchonreligion.org/church-organization/michael-mcbride-on-religious-free-riding-and-the-mormon-church

    One of the questions they ponder towards the end is, since the Mormons are so successful, why don’t other churches copy their methods and organization?

    I’m wondering why some non-supernaturalist group like the Ethical Culture Society can’t do this? I understand from reading Laurence Iannaccone that there is an organizational advantage (suppression of free riding) to forcing people to bear a modest stigma in order to be members, but why does it have to be theological? Why can’t a church be officially agnostic about the supernatural, and impose a stigma on members by forcing them to wear weird clothing? What am I missing?

    I’m also wondering why a ward is so much larger than the Dunbar number.

    [Reply]

    Dire Badger Reply:

    Humans don’t value what they do not sacrifice to achieve.
    wearing magic underwear is a sacrifice, as is a hair shirt. As is believing in the supernatural.
    The weirder and more ‘separating’ the customs, the stronger the ‘faith’ of the followers. (up to a certain point)

    [Reply]

    survivingbabel Reply:

    Club Mormon: Free Riders, Monitoring, and Exclusion in the LDS Church.

    I am unreasonably excited at the prospect of taking a half hour of a lazy Saturday to read this.

    [Reply]

    RiverC Reply:

    1. It’s not that simple, given that at least from the perspective of those with the power to do a number of the things that the Mormons do, you can’t be sure how much Mormonism you’d pick up along with their structures.

    2. The element of the ‘sacred’ I talked about before plays a strong role in people being willing to take on modest sacrifices (like Lenten abstinences) as a matter of course.

    3. Because the Mormons don’t actually know what they’re doing (they’re only less than 200 years old as an org.) — trial and error!

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 1:51 am Reply | Quote
  • Dire Badger Says:

    I think we aren’t talking enough about the natural tendency of human beings who have reached the apex to ‘shut the door behind them’, and try to prevent anyone else from diluting their power or replacing them.
    Destroying upwards mobility is kind of the ‘life the universe and everything’ moment.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 2:40 am Reply | Quote
  • laofmoonster Says:

    1. Gene-culture coevolution, and a better integration of HBD into understanding the Cathedral. Moldbug and HBDChick both analyze English exceptionalism, in very different approaches.

    Moldbug without HBD becomes conspiratorial (and mere race realism is insufficient here). Ascribing the Cathedral to Cathedralites does not go far back enough on the causal chain.

    On the other side, HBDChick’s incessantly apolitical/cutesy/aspie persona allows her to focus on the “fact” part of hatefacts in a non-belligerent atmosphere. If not specifically her theories, any HBD benefits.

    I’m not too optimistic on this happening, it seems that HBD, while relevant to NRx, attracts different kinds of people as a topic of interest than NRx as such.

    2. Somewhat related, a better understanding of causality. Jayman regularly gets into arguments once in a while about genes, environment, and behavior. and I feel something is missing in the discussion. Resolving this requires better philosophy, linguistic precision and statistical reasoning. I don’t think it’s a question of biology.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 3:03 am Reply | Quote
  • admin Says:

    I’ve noticed with some consternation that no one yet seems to have added ‘shoggoth whispering’ to the list of neglected topics.

    [Reply]

    Peter A. Taylor Reply:

    I thought this came under Nick B. Steves’ suggestion of “Occult mind control”.

    Somebody needs to make this into a movie. The Shoggoth Whisperer.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 3:22 pm Reply | Quote
  • Antisthenean Says:

    We need to talk more about how Le Pen is supposedly ‘far’ right wing.

    http://www.thelocal.fr/20140404/le-pen-says-no-more-pork

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 3:37 pm Reply | Quote
  • Rorschach Romanov Says:

    “True Detective” is a refreshing expression of pessimism- subsetted in a decadent culture of the affirmation of life, and by “life,” I mean the most puerile optimistic humanism. And as we know, said optimistic humanism, as it presents itself in the West is hedonism- absent any of its traditional Epicurean elements.

    There is, undoubtedly, an etiological link from Orgy-world (Baudrillard) to extinction. Baudrillard asks, as I see it, perhaps the most penetrating and relevant question of our Age- I shall say, it is a question that the “Left” (if I may be granted pardon to speak so vaguely) and the Cathedral more concretely, cannot answer:

    “In the very heartland of wealth and liberation, you always hear the same question: what are you doing after the orgy? What do you do when everything is available- sex, flowers, the stereotypes of life and death?”

    “True Detective” reveals just how sickeningly banal the grounds with which life marches on these days.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 3:40 pm Reply | Quote
  • Kgaard Says:

    How about a Hoppean analysis of the Chinese real estate collapse? The more I think about this, the more I feel the snowballing problems in real estate in third-tier cities are revealing the Achilles heel in the Chinese model: Since nobody “owns” China, Hoppe would argue, the leadership will be more focused on skimming and stealing than creating long term value. If that has been the case (and revelations from the anti-corruption drives suggest it has) then China ultimately could be shown to have all the problems of democracies — only bigger and worse.

    What happens if Chinese real estate pancakes and the leadership splinters because no one is up to the task of papering it over?

    As graft opportunities decline, who will want to take on the thankless task of guiding China through a smooth deleveraging process?

    So far the money markets are quiescent. But there are odd signs afoot: The yuan has started weakening. All the big bank stocks trade for EXACTLY the same valuations (4.8x earnings and 0.75x book, more or less) which suggests somebody is propping up the share prices …

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 5:07 pm Reply | Quote
  • Rasputin Says:

    Admin,

    Would be facinated to read a ‘review’ of True Detective when you’ve finished watching, if you were inclined to write one? Meta-True Detective, or something…

    Also, interesting to see Schlichter tackling Graeber head on here:

    http://detlevschlichter.com/2014/03/incredible-confusions-part-3-david-graeber-asks-why-austerity-if-we-can-just-print-the-money/

    and here

    http://detlevschlichter.com/2014/03/the-bank-of-englands-paper-on-money-creation-and-a-reply-to-david-graeber/

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    I’m sure I’ll be highly inclined to do some kind of TD review — but I’m on family time, which means it won’t be much before the end of April by the time I get through it.

    Thanks for the Schlichter on Graeber refs — will pursue with gusto.

    [Reply]

    Rasputin Reply:

    Great. I will look forward to anything that occurs – the more abstruse the better!

    The Schlichter / Graeber thing is interesting: I think it closely relates to the question of economics / politics and which one ultimately subordinates the other. I have seen them both talk in the past and I would love to see them debate in person.

    Related to that, If we had stronger NRx groups set up in meat-space it might be easier to organise things like talks / debates. Would you be able to drop a post sometime to help figure out if there are enough London based people make a meet up worthwhile? I know the DC crowd get together every once in a while and it sounds productive.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 9:25 pm Reply | Quote
  • RiverC Says:

    @j. ont.

    According to some, only the dark night of the soul is a solution to nihilism. If too few thinkers are capable of belief in God, you cannot harness the benefits of belief. Most of us acquire belief through experience and not in relation to man’s inability to square the circle of reality. In theory if enough leaders believed to be willing to make religion central (however this may play out) the rest will follow in a number of generations.

    This being said, these leaders cannot have a belief of the quality of Joel Osteen or John Hagee – the style of ‘faith’ these men have, as well as much of Protestantism, is mercantile in the sense that it is about selling the faith. A simple metric for this liturgically – in the setting of what the group / cult spends their greatest time doing – does the leader face toward or away from the rest? If toward, the focus is, for those who learn religion by experience, towards them and in response to their desires. If away, the focus is on something else and it is not structurally mercantile. The description of its ‘economy’ cannot be described as a circle jerk. (It would also happen that it has a real hierarchy present.)

    So I think the proper question is, what is required to get the thinkers/leaders to take back ahold of the faith — of any faith they can agree on? In traditional societies men joined the order via an initiation. Lent started as an initiation. For the nihilist though, this initiation must spark for them ‘the dark night of the soul’ – and they must be willing to undertake it. The result would hopefully be someone willing to understand, as Dionysius said,

    “But these things are not to be disclosed to the uninitiated, by whom I mean those attached to the objects of human thought, and who believe there is no superessential Reality beyond, and who imagine that by their own understanding they know it that has made Darkness Its secret place.”

    [Reply]

    kgaard Reply:

    River C … If you’re talking about a return to some sort of muscular christianity with a high fundamentalist quotient isn’t that just a total non- starter? Religions started as scientific teleogies. Nobody had to suspend disbelief in order to ascribe to them. This seems a bad path for NEO-reaction. Joseph Campbll laid out the real challenge when he argued that religious symbology changes when the external circumstances of life change — and that it takes 150 years for a new symbology to come together and cohere. This, i think, is the (legitimate) project of the New Agers, many of whom are closet Ron Paul fans and hence potential fellow travelers of neoreaction …

    [Reply]

    RiverC Reply:

    Given that religion is a sphere of human life that most people must participate in, in some form, or go insane, the problem is that you’re dealing with a high fundamentalist quotient either way.

    Some folks don’t see it that way, but it’s not reality. You will not see a ‘new age symbology’ that is anything more than marginal. The Enlightenment itself, at the same time it was claiming no basis for miracles or the supernatural or God, was swimming in occult practice, the miraculous and unexplained, and every manner of fundamentalist raving and enthusiasm. The ‘New Age’ stuff is just the same old, same old, but with a little oriental flavor instead of Rosicrucianism. Less Kabbalah, more Bhavagad Gita.

    The crisis or ‘death of God’ seems to have had little bearing on this kind of behavior, other than perhaps making it more Buddhist and Zen flavored rather than Jewish. Don’t look there for the answer, but you may get hints as to what the changes will look like — they will probably be ‘Eastern’.

    I can say this because I also took this path.

    [Reply]

    RiverC Reply:

    Read Frithjof Schoun, I guess is my advice. Understand the difference between these Gnostic sects and real religions, for one. This is the stuff us ‘Theonomists’ bring to the table, if you don’t partake of it, you may do so at your peril. (I take it as given that I also should be studying what AnCaps and EN’s write, since the areas of economy and identity are pieces of the puzzle.)

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Frithjof Schoun … Just read up on him. I like this guy … and yes his philosophy basically describes the path to which I was referring. As you say this is, at root, Upanishadian. From your first email it sounded like you were arguing for a doubling down on old-time Billy Sunday-style Christianity. I agree that for the masses this may be a reasonable path. But I don’t think those who don’t actually believe it should be the trumpeters and defenders of it, based on some sort of Straussian noble-lie calculation. (That’s the kind of thinking that got us into the Iraq war.)

    I see your point that New Age is just sloppily re-formulating the Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita. Still … I have a soft spot for them. To my mind, the better New Agers are analogs of the neoreactionaries. In Myers Briggs terms, virtually every neoreactionary is an NT, and the good New Agers are virtually all NFs. New Age is to religion as Neoreaction is to politics. They live and breathe these issues.

    As an aside, the New Age healers are pointing a way toward political freedom vis a vis the healthcare system. If you use their methods, you can drop off the government healthcare grid …

    RiverC Reply:

    New Age healers are full of nonsense, though Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine contain some wisdom about prevention of disease. They also contain some weird errors, which like the knowledge in the Library of Alexandria it requires even additional intellectual resources to parse out.

    kgaard Reply:

    New Age healing is largely a westernization of chinese and ayurvedic methods to begin with. A lot of these remedies have been scientifically proven to work, such as:

    Chakra balancing
    Cranial-sacral treatment
    Muscle testing
    Pendulum diagnostics.

    I have seen all this stuff in action many times ….

    JPOutlook Reply:

    as well as much of Protestantism, is mercantile in the sense that it is about selling the faith.

    Much of Catholicism is about selling the faith, if we’re going to make pretensions at objectivity.

    [Reply]

    RiverC Reply:

    I’m not Roman Catholic, but at least since Vatican II it seems that Roman Catholicism has become more Protestant than Catholic.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 10:18 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    Nick, keep an eye out on Katrina. She’s a brilliant prospect with similar interests to Amy Ireland. https://goldsmiths.academia.edu/KatrinaBurch

    [Reply]

    Artemisia Reply:

    I second this – Katrina’s at PAF as well, she works on decay, and she is absolutely brilliant.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Do any of you young geniuses have websites that can be linked to? Or is that a decrepit oldie thing?

    [Reply]

    Mark Warburton Reply:

    She had a blog. Called ‘inhuman archeology’ or something. She took it down around September time. I’m going to encourage her to get it back up.

    Artemisia Reply:

    Maybe we could start one. Interesting thoughts think through me very infrequently and incoherently, but Amy and Katrina are a different story…

    JPOutlook Reply:

    Hahahaha!

    Posted on April 5th, 2014 at 10:38 pm Reply | Quote
  • RiverC Says:

    Reading the Ireland piece. The diagramming is great, and clarifies the unintended consequences of Kant trying to get stable knowledge out of a warped lens. The use of the term parasite is intriguing, Bob Godwin (of One Cosmos) uses the term frequently, ‘mind parasite’, which is among other things the noise in the mind that causes it to distort reality.

    The logismoi, or suggestion is, in our tradition, the way in which such noise enters the mind or nous. While the noise is not a demon, it is considered demonic (having its origin there). The phrase “Freedom from thoughts” appears a number of times and as far as I know refers primarily to a state in which suggestions no longer arise either from Outside or as replays/generations from Inside. Nothing is left but pure perception or knowing… and the corollary to it, natural and unmediated will. The fixed text from which all of this comes from is the Beatitude: “Blessed (happy) are the pure in heart; for they shall see God.

    I would imagine that the pure in heart also see a lot of other things as well. It is both a wonderful and dreadful proposition.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 6th, 2014 at 2:48 am Reply | Quote
  • Tryptophan Says:

    Maybe I’m late to the party but has admin seen this?

    http://metrotimes.com/culture/inside-out-1.1382127

    Turns out the opposite of Outside In is Detroit…

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 6th, 2014 at 5:38 pm Reply | Quote
  • VXXC Says:

    “ADDED: How about telling me what we’re not talking about enough?”

    The soft bloated underbelly of pandemic corruption in the Cathedral?

    And no the answer isn’t patience. When the Death Star of a thousand ports is about to destroy your planet anyway, weaknesses or not the answer isn’t patience.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 7th, 2014 at 12:17 pm Reply | Quote
  • VXXC Says:

    @Tryptophan

    They gotta go, that’s the answer.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 7th, 2014 at 12:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • Peter A. Taylor Says:

    ‘”Recant Your Heresies,” the Freethinker Demanded, Trembling with Religious Fury and Transcendant Ecstasy’.

    http://minx.cc/?post=348298

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 7th, 2014 at 1:39 pm Reply | Quote
  • Erik Says:

    “If you have the right to demand that I bake you a cake, then I have the right to force you to attend church, mosque, or synagogue.”
    (or as a commenter added: “If you have the right to drag me to diversity seminars…”)

    Firefox feedback graph (programmed by some subcompetent faggot who insists on adding a 0 data point for tomorrow) suddenly spikes with massive amounts of negative comments, to the great surprise of SWPLs who extrapolate from 25% of their TV programs being gay to 25% of the population being gay. Compare to the failed boycott of Chick-Fil-A. Conservatives are very, very good at dragging their feet and terrible at pushing back. Maybe there will be a saxoning at some point?

    [Reply]

    RiverC Reply:

    Pale Moon is an option for those who require Firefox like functionality.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 7th, 2014 at 8:21 pm Reply | Quote
  • Peter A. Taylor Says:

    Claire Berlinski reviews _Icarus Fallen: The Search for Meaning in an Uncertain World_

    http://www.hoover.org/publications/policy-review/article/6470

    ‘Lacking any sense of purpose, Delsol asserts, modern man enshrouds himself in technological and physical comfort, leading a life that is at once free of risk and mediocre, mouthing vapid, unexamined clichés. These she calls “the clandestine ideology of our time” — clandestine because no overt adherence to ideology is now socially permissible. Yet the banishment of the economy of ideology, she astutely remarks, has encouraged a black market to flourish in its place: “This underground moral code is saturated with sentimentality yet arbitrarily intolerant.”’

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 8th, 2014 at 1:30 am Reply | Quote
  • Peter A. Taylor Says:

    Richard Fernandez:

    “Prince Charming’s Castle is architecturally identical to the Tower of London. And tolerance of the right sort of intolerance is of course, tolerance.”

    http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2014/04/05/eich/?singlepage=true

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 8th, 2014 at 1:33 am Reply | Quote
  • Alex Says:

    “… the researchers are working to create powerful biomimetic actuators for locomotion.”

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 8th, 2014 at 6:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • Peter A. Taylor Says:

    This looks interesting (hat tip: Instapundit).

    _The Once and Future King: The Rise of Crown Government in America_

    “This remarkable new book shatters just about every myth surrounding American government, the Constitution, and the Founding Fathers, and offers the clearest warning about the alarming rise of one-man rule in the age of Obama.

    Most Americans believe that this country uniquely protects liberty, that it does so because of its Constitution, and that for this our thanks must go to the Founders, at their Convention in Philadelphia in 1787.

    F. H. Buckley’s book debunks all these myths….

    What we have is what Founder George Mason called an “elective monarchy,” which he thought would be worse than the real thing.

    Much of this is irreversible.”
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594037191/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1594037191&linkCode=as2&tag=wwwviolentkicom

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    Posted on April 9th, 2014 at 1:38 am Reply | Quote

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