Chaos Patch (#114)

(Open thread + links (Vietnam distracted edition))

Neoreaction, the overview. Jungle law. Crushed in the culture wars (viz). Tiger rider. View from the (thoughtful) left. Breitbart raises bristles. The weekly round, plus outliers.

The world is going to Schiff (video). What is Marxism? The Committee to Abolish Outer Space (communist). Morality and nihilism. Sociologists are hacks. Uber upsets the right left people.

Duerte Harry (some background). Oil crisis round-up (Saudi, Venezuela (plus), Nigeria). 9/11 reverberations. Stubborn Suu Kyi. China’s demographic bust. Geopolitical tragedy (video).

Trumpenführer panic report (1, 2, 3). Trump enthusiasm in China and India. Libertarians (plus) and neoconservatives crumble. Butlergate (or something). Comedy of errors (not unconnected). Principled conservatives. Opposition woes (and illusions).

Facebook Cathedralizes in public (1, 2). How to get banned from Twitter. Social media is breaking everything up. Media diplomacy fail.

Race realism in the UK (full). The stereotype factory. Model minority muddle.

Connecting the gene-IQ dots (noted). What Eysenck and Gottfredson share.

Motivated epigenetics. Missing mitochondria. Sub-basement of the monkey trap.

Illegal primes.

May 15, 2016admin 47 Comments »
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47 Responses to this entry

  • cyborg_nomade Says:

    appreciate the attention

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 4:24 pm Reply | Quote
  • grey enlightenment Says:

    *. How to get banned from Twitter*

    People have obv. gotten banned from Twitter for far less and then there is the whole issue of censoring and ghosting. Celebrities on Twitter have a separate more lenient set of rules applied to them, because Twitter’s business model needs them.

    Peter Schift = stopped clock that is never right

    Peter Thiel effective spokesperson for the pro-civilization ethos of NRx

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:03 pm Reply | Quote
  • Seth Largo Says:

    That Sam Kriss piece is the anti-Lure of the Void, unless he’s being ironic, but based on his other writings, I don’t think he is.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Pro-civilization is always good, so long as civilization does not become controlling. That is the paradox of human society, I’d think.

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    You have it entirely backwards, civilization never served man, it is man who has always served civilization. Each civilization can be thought of as a living organism, it has all 7 characteristics of life. From the perspective of energy flow in the universe and the unstoppable thermodynamic push for equilibrium, the point of civilization is that it’s a higher level of complexity more capable of accessing energy and accelerating entropy production. It already controls and manipulates us as blunt tools, just as the laws of the universe controls and manipulates civilization. To act as if we have a voice in the matter, is blasphemy against the gods that manifest as laws of the universe. If being too controlling is maladaptive for civilization then it’s problematic, to look at it otherwise would be like wondering if our bodies are too controlling of it’s cells, a degenerative perspective.

    Catallaxy and “Civilization is the only morality” are two ways of looking at the same thing.

    [Reply]

    spigot Reply:

    Have you got a blog or a Twitter account anywhere Aeroguy?

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    Spigot:
    I don’t do Twitter nor do I have a blog but I do have a backlog of half written text files I’m going to start converting into Social Matter articles, when I do it will be under the name James Thorne.

    Brett:
    What I mean by who serves who isn’t a matter of benefits, but of who holds the whip and who sets the rules. Tajima cattle might also be said to benefit from civilization. Man became a domesticated species the same as the others, broken in to the needs of civilization. Being at the forefront of composing the intelligence of civilization has privileged man, but it is not entitlement, especially since the mind of civilization has become as much machine as it is organic. Unlike the precivilized man, the bulk of humanity in civilization must consume most of his time and efforts into labor, in the present when we have long since past the point where we could enjoy 10 hour work weeks with lives filled with simple leisure instead even the upper echelons who in times past had been called the leisure class boast of their 60+ hour work weeks.

    In an apparatus with a treadmill and a carrot hanging on the end of stick just out of reach, the only person who might think the purpose of the apparatus is to provide carrots is whoever occupies the treadmill. Even in leisure I consume it in study, truth is my carrot. The occasional person hacking the process isn’t a big deal, but if too many do so the result is gigadeath. Scott Alexander calls it Moloch and wishes he could remake it into something friendly, man holding the whip, to divert it from it’s ascendent path into a stagnant beautiful evolutionary spandrel, a dead end, extinction with a whimper. Competition of course makes this a pipe dream but that never stops a leftist from trying.

    (This actually is suggestive of a complete reversal of terms to confuse new readers. Admin is a progressive who wants to accelerate catalaxy, Warg is a conservative who isn’t entirely comfortable with catalaxy but just wants to slow it down rather than stop it, reactionaries who are comfortable with gigadeath if it means ending catalaxy, and Scott Alexander the NRx who wants to keep tech to avoid gigadeath but still somehow end catalaxy all together)

    Brett Stevens Reply:

    You have it entirely backwards, civilization never served man, it is man who has always served civilization.

    I disagree. Civilization also serves man: three squares and a roof over your head, plus advantages like cumulative learning, rule of law and group defense against rape waves from more primitive tribes.

    The point, however, to use your cybernetic analogy, is that civilization can be hacked.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mike Says:

    The Jacobin article about Uber was… enjoyable. The left is nervously contemplating the reality of technologically-mediated exit routing around democratic-bureaucratic roadblocks.

    We can thus infer that the author is aware, however dimly, of the threat exit poses to the left.

    The article also indulges in the usual leftist bad habit of privileging labour over consumers, which is silly, because workers are all consumers. (Once you stop privileging labour over consumers, you’re more or less at third-wayism.)

    [Reply]

    Brett Stevens Reply:

    Uber is a temporary phenomenon. At some point, the actual costs of business will catch up with the illusion and it will vanish, much like Apple, Amazon, etc.

    [Reply]

    Uriel Alexis Reply:

    jacobinism is the fatal failure of the Left. too unfortunate it came so early on and took hold.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:23 pm Reply | Quote
  • Abelard Lindsey Says:

    The neo-reaction overview site is an example of what is wrong with neo-reaction and why it will fail. Like most previous political movements, it seems focused on the idea of centralized authority and what I call the Cult of the One Perfect System (Socialism and Christianity are examples of this cult). This is a very 20th century mode of thinking and is increasingly obsolete.

    It is increasingly clear to me that technological innovations in 3-D printing, bio-engineering, small scale nuclear power (both fission and fusion) and commercial space development will lead to radical decentralization of social structure and authority. Top-down centralized social structures are becoming obsolete.

    The alt-right/neo-reaction fails to comprehend these trends. They seem to pine for 20th century (or even 19th century and before) solutions to 21st century problems. I prefer 21st century solutions to 21st century problems.

    The other problem with the alt-right/neo-reaction is that much of it seems to be rooted in luddism. I believe that technology in the long run empowers small to medium self-interested groups over that of the large. Its almost as though much of the alt-right/neo-reaction seeks to inhibit this trend. Why they would want this is totally irrational to me. Needless to say, this mentality also guarantees its impotence and failure.

    Blogger Alfin:

    https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/

    presents the much more sensible 21st century approach of creating a parallel social network comprised of decentralized nodes of technological and social competence. He is definitely not a luddite, nor does he subscribe to the concept of centralized top-down social structures (like me, he recognizes these are rapidly becoming obsolete).

    I believe Alfin’s way of thinking is the proper approach for the alt-right/neo-reaction.

    [Reply]

    jay Reply:

    @Abelard Lindsey

    ”The alt-right/neo-reaction fails to comprehend these trends. They seem to pine for 20th century (or even 19th century and before) solutions to 21st century problems. I prefer 21st century solutions to 21st century problems.”

    Having Pre-Enlightenment principles but not copying their forms.

    [Reply]

    Erebus Reply:

    >”the alt-right/neo-reaction”

    Why conflate the two when they are so fundamentally different? The alt-right is basically populist and political, whereas neoreaction disdains populism and democratic politics..

    >”It is increasingly clear to me that technological innovations in 3-D printing, bio-engineering, small scale nuclear power (both fission and fusion) and commercial space development will lead to radical decentralization of social structure and authority. Top-down centralized social structures are becoming obsolete.”

    In practice, are we seeing any movement towards “decentralization of social structure and authority”, or are we seeing the consolidation of social structure and authority? I’d argue the latter. Private enterprise was much more free in decades past. The legal system & the bureaucracies & other inefficiencies connected to it have never been more overgrown than they are right now… and they’re all still growing, malignantly.

    So how, exactly, are 3D printing and commercial space development going to loosen the USG’s grip on power? (I don’t know what you mean by “bioengineering,” and it’s not clear to me why you think that nuclear power — the most regulated industry of all, quite literally regulated into oblivion — has any relevance here.)

    [Reply]

    Brett Stevens Reply:

    The neo-reaction overview site is an example of what is wrong with neo-reaction and why it will fail.

    Yes, like certain widely popular #nrx sites.

    Like most previous political movements, it seems focused on the idea of centralized authority and what I call the Cult of the One Perfect System (Socialism and Christianity are examples of this cult).

    No, you’re falling into the same trap that they are. Systems themselves are broken, whether perfect or not. Restore nature and point it toward transcendental goals.

    [Reply]

    Nick B. Steves Reply:

    I’d be curious how you got “Cult of the One Perfect System” out of that.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:29 pm Reply | Quote
  • Abelard Lindsey Says:

    The Cult of the One Perfect System is the belief that there is one system, which could be a religion, ideology, or socio-economic system that is optimized for all human beings. Basically all religions and leftist ideologies are examples of this cult.

    There will never be the One Future. There will be a multiplicity of futures with a multiplicity of systems and world-views.

    I think the novel “Snow Crash” captures the spirit of what the future will be like.

    [Reply]

    michael Reply:

    I think your conflating on several levels first as already pointing out youre confusing several really disparate threads of the dark enlightenment nrx and Alt Reich BTW theres many more and and many have little in common except ‘no enemies to the right’
    But you are also confusing the philosophy for the patchwok. A lot of the things you read about specifics are one persons idea of how they might want to rule their own patch not what the philosphy is. So land wants to be ruled by techno futurist robots AI or something which sounds like you might like, and another wants a neo fascist monarchy of some sort like galts gulch , and the alt reich wants a white nation with some social safety net maybe, I would consider alfin part of the dark enlightenment, because hes revealing reality and reality is what drives all the threads, but some are animated more by some revelations than others.
    You are not only correct that some tech has the potential to crack the cathedral its a really big theme around here, but there are other forces at work and time waits for no one. so theres that to consider.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:33 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    Sub-basement of the monkey trap.

    that is original research article which been used to write a media report

    Saturation of recognition elements blocks evolution of new tRNA identities
    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/4/e1501860.full

    hard to crack article indeed, no surprise some comfusing statements in the Motherboard report like

    “Any more than 20 amino acids, and the machinery of gene expression got confused.”

    well, for example human growth hormone contains 191 amino acids, prolactine 198 amino acids and so on …

    [Reply]

    Erebus Reply:

    The Motherboard article is written in a confusing (read: idiotic) way, but it’s not talking about protein length — it’s talking about the 20 proteinogenic amino acids — in other words, the 20-letter alphabet that the machinery of gene expression has to work with. The mystery is why the genetic code didn’t evolve to incorporate more amino acids — like, for instance, presently non-proteinogenic homoleucine and beta-methyl-amino alanine (BMAA), among many others — as presumably an expanded amino alphabet would lead to gains in efficiency.

    BMAA offers something of a clue here: The aforementioned machinery isn’t always capable of distinguishing BMAA from the proteinogenic amino acid serine, thus dietary BMAA can be misincorporated into proteins with extremely deleterious results.

    Structural proteins like titin can contain tens of thousands of amino acids, by the way. Collagen is basically a polymer. Protein length has never been a problem.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    I’m no geneticist, but this sort of reminds me of when when clueless armchair linguists scratch their heads wondering why English orthography doesn’t have schwa or eth or theta.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    tRNA can deliver amino acid in sequence as many time as it is required. so it is not a limitation really and why we need tRNA to carry more then 21 amino acid, only 21 exist.

    interpretation of research articles is not easy, writers will do much better if they will use ‘review’ type of publications.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 5:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • Grotesque Body Says:

    Evola is alright, but he never wrote anything as jaw-dropping as ‘Man and Technics’ (imho).

    [Reply]

    Brett Stevens Reply:

    Let me know when either write anything as jaw-dropping as Ecce Homo or The Republic.

    Alternately: when they write something as mind-blowing as Diabolical Full Moon Mysticism or Hvis Lyset Tar Oss.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    Ecce Homo isn’t really all that remarkable.

    [Reply]

    SanguineEmpiricist Reply:

    hater

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    @SE

    Quite.

    Posted on May 15th, 2016 at 10:43 pm Reply | Quote
  • Grotesque Body Says:

    >China is projected to have 30 million more bachelors than single women of similar age

    >betauprisingpepe.jpg

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 1:05 am Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    The Committee to Abolish Outer Space (communist). 

    this piece quite vigorously articulated and utterly crazy, not remember reading anything like that for long time.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 5:57 am Reply | Quote
  • Augustus Pugin Says:

    That antifa piece is pretty bizarre. Why would someone spend so much of their life cataloging their enemies? They appear to only have one killer meme too, which is rapidly reaching saturation point. Ctrl+F “racis” = 30 results found.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 6:16 am Reply | Quote
  • Anomaly UK Says:

    The British media are narcissistic mannerless barbarians? Who knew?

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 7:46 am Reply | Quote
  • Blogospheroid Says:

    Would the forum users be kind enough to spell out their investment patterns?

    My bit follows – I never quite understood why those calling for passivism are usually so “active” in their investment preferences.

    Passive investing is more or less winning in the developed markets with greater number of people throwing up their arms at trying to track individual stocks/funds and just investing in a market index at low cost. This approach is also expected to continue to grow.

    NRxers preach a contrary line, so one might expect something different in investment preferences as well. But deviating from common knowledge to the extent that Schiff and the gold bugs do can be extremely hazardous to your personal finances, which directly affects No. 1 point on the NRx agenda – become worthy. You’re not going to be very worthy if your net worth is low due to your contrary bets not working out.

    I’m currently invested in a mix of domestic (indian) equities and bonds and am going to start investing in global funds from next year.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 8:37 am Reply | Quote
  • Tentative Joiner Says:

    This remark (by a decidedly blue-team rationalist) caught my attention:

    side effects of [Effective Altruism]: I parse all news about malaria as updates about how Our Team is doing against the Hated Enemy

    What tech news (which is what news about malaria ultimate is) could NRx parse similarly? Several technologies that enable exit (up to and including speciation) come to mind.

    I must also note that our host is in an unusual position to chuckle and rub his hands at signs of a runaway intelligence explosion approaching.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 9:03 am Reply | Quote
  • Anonymous Says:

    I would like to see you post an “Outside In Recommended Reading List”. Most other NRx blogs have posted similar lists and it would be interesting to see what books you think everybody should read (or at least everybody in NRx).

    Also, have you considered expanding the “Neoreaction” section at the top of the blog? You’ve written several essential posts on political theory and various other subjects which ought to be added to this section.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Both belong on the task list, I agree.

    [Reply]

    Brett Stevens Reply:

    It may save you time to expand on this:

    http://www.amerika.org/books/

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    Margaret “muh blank slate” Mead, really?

    Posted on May 16th, 2016 at 9:39 am Reply | Quote
  • Anon Says:

    Think my original comment got swallowed into the ether due to links

    @admin, you might get a kick out of this

    http://fullmetalautist.tumblr.com/image/144480880962

    and here’s the review of Sandifer’s “book” on NRx the above quotes were pulled from

    http://psybersecurity.tumblr.com/post/144173126036/pwning-sandifer

    [Reply]

    Erebus Reply:

    That is very interesting. So was this prelude:

    http://psybersecurity.tumblr.com/post/144100924760/review-of-neoreaction-a-basilisk

    If that review is correct, the “book” is a disgrace — nothing more than a long and disjointed rant, full of inanities like “white culture fails the Turing test.”

    …I am not surprised. I don’t think that Sandifer has ever written anything of value. He has been a joke for a very long time. (There’s some background over at Encyclopedia Dramatica. Also see his laughable interactions with Vox Day, this being the most recent example.)

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    “I’m a little burnt on this subject right now.”

    [Reply]

    Skilluminati Reply:

    Christ Jesus, mate, that is exponentially more engagement than the material could possibly justify.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    Everyone in NRx is obsessed with language.

    [Reply]

    Anon Reply:

    “Christ Jesus, mate, that is exponentially more engagement than the material could possibly justify.”

    “Everyone in NRx is obsessed with language.”

    I think there’s some miscommunication here. I didn’t write the “review”. Someone on tumblr did. The image full of quotes was drawing attention to the hilarity of the tubmlrite’s review; the review of Sandifer’s book and Sandifer’s book itself are both terrible, if that wasn’t obvious.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    Oh, no, I got the point. That was just an independent observation I was making.

    [Reply]

    Skilluminati Reply:

    Appreciate the clarification & apologies for my implication.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 17th, 2016 at 2:56 am Reply | Quote
  • Tentative Joiner Says:

    Science Proves Rich People are Jerks”. Or not. (Supporting the alternative hypothesis is bad for your carrier.)

    Pigmen on the horizon.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 19th, 2016 at 3:18 pm Reply | Quote
  • Outliers (#6) Says:

    […] JQ mainstreaming? Mirror black. Rape. Ironism. Mao-y Republicans. Depthless minds. #nrx digests: here and […]

    Posted on May 22nd, 2016 at 5:03 am Reply | Quote

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