Chaos Patch (#55)

(open thread + links)

Schmitt, sovereignty, and distributed systems (with a reminder), also sovereignty and fealty. Algorithmic monarchism. Another (excellent) introduction to NRx (also this). Radical ethno-nationalism, pro and con. Diversity and complexity. Thede union. The burden of common culture, and locality. Original sin, and the theology of ruin. Entryists. Practical feudalism (and a glimpse into the coming book). Vulgar as hell, but genuinely witty. Secession stuff. Friday fragments. Meta-reaction (and related ‘This Week in Doom’).

A couple of LKY stragglers (and video), plus another three. Demographic disaster in China (also, if the PRC has a PR operation in Hong Kong, it might need to up its game). Battlefield Europe. The corpse in Russia’s basement (also).

Murray and Putnam on class, plus more about Murray. The insanity of the Left is becoming hard for even leftists to miss. Reality is triggering. Entertainment from Gawker. Nerd comedy.

Musk really wants to sell electric cars. Plus, chilling on warming. Justine Tunney on nations and corporations (video). Why isn’t Silicon Valley more like Detroit?

Black-Hispanic conflict in America (with extra anecdotes), and also relevant. Difficult conversations. College material. Israelis versus Jews (also worth remembering). Chinese in Africa. The unbearable whiteness of philosophy. Recolonization please. Race surrealists are a waste of time.

Lovecraft’s liberalism. Strauss and liberty (plus more on Strauss).

Group selection is a mirage. All psych is evo-psych. Baby-editing time approaches. Too smart for their own good. The SAT isn’t measuring affluence. Consensus catalepsy. Moral extremity.

Darkly comic.

March 29, 2015admin 56 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos

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56 Responses to this entry

  • Chaos Patch (#55) | Neoreactive Says:

    […] Chaos Patch (#55) […]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 8:20 am Reply | Quote
  • Chris B Says:

    Looks like we have an interesting discussion of whether sovereignty is ultimately tied to territorial contexts, or if it is ultimately tied to social groups that needs to be had.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    ‘What are the limits to tendential deterritorialization?’ would be my preferred formulation.

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    Way too big a question to answer in one bite. I guess this is where D&G and Accelerationism enter the fray?

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 9:03 am Reply | Quote
  • Chaos Patch (#55) | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 12:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • Bryce Laliberte Says:

    Thank you for the plug again, but I haven’t been able to figure out the “feudalism” description.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    You don’t think the relation of patronage is distinctly feudal in nature? (I’m assuming there’s no risk of that being read as a criticism in this neck of the woods.)

    [Reply]

    Bryce Laliberte Reply:

    I can see that, but why mightn’t it be more, say, merchant city-state? Patronage was a popular pastime of the techno-commercial Italian city-states. Other major patron of science and the arts was the Church.

    Hmm, perhaps this is worth a blog post.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Subordination of the profit motive. (This noted by someone who has always been blessed by Gnon when it comes to patronage relationships — though of an imperfectly formalized variety.)

    SanguineEmpiricist Reply:

    This made me laugh, non-linear methodological references getting a little out of control.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 4:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • Erebus Says:

    That article about how those leftists are making it difficult to teach reminded me of this, which I came across earlier today.

    I have just one comment: It is cowardly to work, voluntarily, in such environments. Keeping one’s head down, concealing one’s opinions, waking up in fear that one might be discovered, or that one’s colleagues might discover a verboten book on one’s desk… Rather seems like taqiyya, or like the behavior of Marrano Jews during the inquisition, doesn’t it? It’s not the sort of thing a free-thinking man should force himself to endure. Not when there are other options. (And, thankfully, there still are!)

    [Reply]

    Was Enlightened Reply:

    It is cowardly to work, voluntarily, in such environments. … It’s not the sort of thing a free-thinking man should force himself to endure. Not when there are other options.

    You mean like … China? Where our excellent host lives, and posts under his real name?

    Those of us in Neoreaction who live in the West seem mostly to be anonymous.

    [Reply]

    Erebus Reply:

    It’s one thing to simply post anonymously, quite another to wake up at night in a cold sweat, afraid that your political opinions — which have nothing to do with your job — might have somehow become known to your coworkers. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate your candor & your blog is excellent… It’s just that the way you so vividly described your fears makes it impossible for me to understand why you would willingly put yourself in your current position. (I’d rather tend bar or work as a farmhand than put up with a fraction of what you describe.)

    With respect to China: Was that a rhetorical question? For what it’s worth, Baidu’s hiring, and I’m pretty sure that nobody in their Beijing office will care about your any of your personal opinions. (I’d add that Japan is much the same. Even better, perhaps, as many Japanese are openly sympathetic to reaction and traditionalism.) Should you work in China, you won’t lose any sleep over politics or philosophy, and that’s gotta count for something.

    Aside: Justine Tunney still works for Google, eh? What’s your take on that?

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 4:35 pm Reply | Quote
  • Was Enlightened Says:

    Thanks for the link!

    From the “Chinese in Africa” piece:

    “There’s a whole lore in China, where Africa has attained this image of this El Dorado: a place [that] with very little experience and little capital, you can start up your own companies, you can attain land, you can engage very profitably in trade, you can strike it rich quickly.”

    Wow. Could there be any stronger evidence for HBD? Africa — for Africans — is a sewer of poverty, illiteracy, war, disease.

    But not for the Chinese! Not for the Chinese WHO HAVE NOTHING WHEN THEY COME TO AFRICA!

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 5:36 pm Reply | Quote
  • trvdante Says:

    Thanks for the plug. Here I was, worried that my Lovecraft piece would incite ire due to him being held in such high regard. Still, always an honor to be featured on Xenosystems!

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 5:59 pm Reply | Quote
  • grey enlightenment Says:

    For example, it was widely reported that Garry Kasparov has an IQ of 190

    Maybe Bobby Fischer, which is plausible considering he was a chess prodigy and youngest champion ever. Same for Magus Carlson

    Musk really wants to sell electric cars.

    not like they will be able to afford a Tesla anyway

    I think experts like Murray are going soft with their over-emphasis on family and should get back to focusing on genes, but that’s crossing the line of sensibility I suppose.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 6:13 pm Reply | Quote
  • Jesse Says:

    In his later years Lovecraft wouldn’t have made a very good neoreactionary, since after the start of the depression he came to believe that automation was making laissez-faire capitalism obsolete and that the government should guarantee everyone either a job or some sort of basic income if there wasn’t enough work to go around. See in particular the long extract from a 28 October 1934 letter on Lovecraft’s wikiquote page, where he wrote things like this: “High-grade service must still receive greater rewards than low-grade service. But amidst the present abundance of goods and minimisation of possible work, there must be a fair and all-inclusive allocation of the chances to perform work and secure rewards. When society can’t give a man work, it must keep him comfortable without it; but it must give him work if it can, and must compel him to perform it when it is needed. … But of course the real need of change comes not from the mere fact of abundant resources, but from the growth of conditions making it impossible for millions to have any chance of getting any resources under the present outworn set of artificial rules. This development is no myth. Machines had displaced 900,000 men in the U. S. before the crash of ’29, and no conceivable regine of “prosperity” (where by a few people will have abundant and flexible resources and successfully exchange them among one another) will ever make it possible to avoid the permanent presence of millions of unemployed, so long as old-fashioned laissez-faire capitalism is adhered to.”

    [Reply]

    E. Antony Gray (@RiverC) Reply:

    Smith also had similar leanings, tho he be the father of ‘capitalism’. In the same way that CS Lewis’ most important contributions to Christianity are his fiction (which is not Explicitly Christian), Lovecraft’s most important contributions to English Reaction are aesthetic in nature.

    The question of ‘the displacement of millions due to automation’ is not a simple one to answer; automation A exists because of demand B; but automation displaces C people, which reduces the demand B by D. “Those people still have to eat’, yes; but now they do not contribute to the economy except to consume. Demand B is permanently altered, and thus automation level A is destabilized.

    Working through the details of ‘guaranteeing work’ (the Right to Work) or ‘guaranteeing subsistence’ (the Right to Eat) shows that a system which is welfare and fancies itself charity is maladaptive at its root, degenerate, and will eventually claim its millions (the millions it created by welfare will eventually be its victims.)

    Lovecraft in this case is doing nothing other than expressing the common opinion of men of his time; here it is not so much that he is not ‘neoreactionary’ as he is ‘not anything at all.’

    I heard Einstein claimed QM was impossible, too…

    [Reply]

    aerdeap Reply:

    Lewis’s fiction is almost all explicity Christian (To one extent or another).

    Good points otherwise

    [Reply]

    Peter A. Taylor Reply:

    This would disqualify Lovecraft as a doctrinaire Libertarian, but only one leg of the Trichotemy is even quasi-libertarian, and even they look down on the doctrinaire Libertarians.

    Since this is a Chaos Patch, I will put in a plug here for the lead essay in Thomas C. Schelling’s collection, _Choice and Consequence_. It covers trade-offs between economic efficiency and distributional justice, among other things. Economists can write theorems about efficiency. Distribution is a different story. There are no generally agreed-upon criteria for what a “just” distribution is, and there is no particular reason for thinking that laissez faire is going to be very good at distribution.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 7:26 pm Reply | Quote
  • NRx_N00B Says:

    Just curious—despite the cold unforgiving harshness of Gnon (yet, w/ a certain degree of fragility)—how many NRx’ers have an appreciation for the profound, deepening beauty of Gnon? Is it a topic worthy of a dedicated Landian post?

    [Reply]

    Izak Reply:

    I’m a fan of Nick Land, but I’d actually say Gnon is his worst invention.

    But you can take that as an endorsement of everything else he has said about the poor judgment of the masses: his most popular idea is his worst one. Isn’t that how it always goes? (Cf. Nietzsche’s “Superman”)

    Although lately, I have been having fun pronouncing the word with an “ng,” the last consonant in a word like “king” or “rung.” So phonetically, it would look like: [ŋɑn]

    You often hear that consonant used word-initially in Chinese or Vietnamese names, like “Nguyen” or “Ngai” or whatever. So with that pronunciation, I just pretend that Gnon is a nagging old Chinese woman who talks in the third person.

    She says stuff like: “Ohhhhh, stupid American round-eye! He no know how to work right, but he know how to pick up welfare check! He know how to pick up worker comp check! He know how to spot microagression for his homosexuar activity! Gnon care not for your laziness! Gnon going to punish you!”

    Like that.

    It’s even better if you imagine Mickey Rooney playing her, sort of like that one performance he did in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, but with crossdressing added.

    This makes me more comfortable with the concept of Gnon.

    [Reply]

    nydwracu Reply:

    In Vietnamese, , pronounced [ŋaːn˧˧], means ‘Muscovy duck’.

    No comment.

    [Reply]

    nydwracu Reply:

    Goddamn HTML sanitization. The word is “ngan”.

    NRx_N00B Reply:

    Thanks, now I won’t be able to get that nagging old Chinese woman’s voice out of my head, hahaha.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 8:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • Alrenous Says:

    NIO got me to think of why sovereigns tend to be territorial. It’s because bordering jurisdictions try to overlap, so they can fight, because they think they can win. Deliberately overlapping them e.g. checks and balances is a recipe for failure through degeneration.

    Specifically he was talking about magna carta era Britain. Why would the king try to seize the barons’ power? Well, why not? The barons were trying to seize his too, the king just happened to win.

    Hopefully for steel anarchism, this only applies to coercive regimes.

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    “Why would the king try to seize the barons’ power? Well, why not? The barons were trying to seize his too, the king just happened to win.” And according to Szabo, he did it by unleashing leftsim. The king and his courts striped positive liberties from franchise holders in the name of protecting the negative liberties of the people. This seems deeply De Jouvenal. We have to face the serious possibility that leftism in its modern guise is royal in character. (As much as this might upset the Larpers)

    Also, I can’t see Sovereignty as being anything but a territorial question. Periods of peace, self delusion, and innapropriate magnification of where the issue of sovereignty rests combine to cloud the question.

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    I still have a hard time suppressing the urge to attack protectionism of all stripes. It wreaks of inefficiency and the worst kind of cronyism. As if to say my definition of a responsible sovereign includes not practicing protectionism.

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    I say this after rereading
    http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.tw/2009/07/secession-liberty-and-dictatorship.html
    The part referencing the duties on agricultural imports to protect the landed gentry. I think if the gentry had the mandate of heaven they would have moved seamlessly into becoming the factory owners but instead they didn’t have sufficient pressure to adapt, became complacent, and so they failed in their duty to maintain themselves at the top of the food chain. Not to say that the actual factory owners were in anyway successors to a proper nobility, rather the gentry was allowed to stagnate into irrelevance and needed artificial measures to maintain what had become a diseased institution. Nobility is not exempt from requiring Malthusian pressure to remain fit.

    (I suppose in retrospect I spoke too soon about protectionism of all strips since a burgeoning native industry does require protection though in practice weaning them off it becomes very political.)

    [Reply]

    vxxc2014 Reply:

    He’s correct and monarchs East and West have done this for all time whenever they’re in a conflict with the nobles.

    It’s happening with American Law Enforcement right now.

    Peculiar to America the Plenary Police Powers rest with the Local Government, in the case of the Sheriff’s directly elected County Sheriff’s. Look at Sheriff Joe in Phoenix.
    In the case of America’s many local police Departments the Police Chief as vested by the Mayor – who is elected. As is the Mayor of Ferguson but everyone including Neoreaction and the rest of the Right can only see Race.

    Why do you think NYPD was the test bed for the first openly political assassinations since the 1970s? Because the NYPD is America’s Flagship Local Law Enforcement and Bratton America’s Chief Policeman. He builds world class Police Depts – he’s also the architect of the revamped LAPD.

    Why do you think the actual beginnings of deliberate targeted killings of Law Enforcement but without the direct protest drama happened along the border with Mexico as well as Florida? Because of the Southern Border, Florida [Miami] being the Heart of Commerce and Banking for Latin America. They began more than a year before the NYPD hits, because someone wanted to make a point about the border [and that someone is thinking logistically]. Mostly it was Border Patrol agents and in conjunction with Executive orders to cease defending the Southern Border and indeed act as middleman for the Gangbanger teenage males [84% of the new immigrants from the border] said DHS CBP handing them off to HHS [their employer and their paymaster for their local establishing hostels and communities]. Someone who is thinking logistically, which means an adult Professional.

    Only amateurs think tactics over logistics, and only histrionics can’t see past racial conflict to what is happening.

    The conflict in Ferguson is over the Plenary Police powers, it could have been settled the very evening of the shooting quietly by signing a DOJ Letter of Consent, the equivalent of a previously independent noble swearing fealty to the Crown.

    In fact Eric Holder’s DOJ Civil Rights Division has been going all over the country for years getting these letters of consent.

    Once the Police are Federalized – the Goal – Police Brutality will disappear from the news radar and public consciousness, just as smoking did once Clinton got the Tobacco deal signed to the immense profits for all in on the deal. Especially Philip Morris [stock went from $17 to $52]. The profit was for all but the consumer because the price of cigarettes doubled or tripled. All profit.

    Heard about Smoking being evil last 10 years? Of course not.

    When Police Brutality disappears from the news and Black Lives go back to being forgotten you will know surrender is complete. As long as there is resistance it will be news.

    A movement that prides itself on being above the common mobs emotions might want to examine the entire race/police #–x lives matter business in a different context then merely being a peculiarly arrogant fringe of the chattering madding crowds. Ahem.

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    @Vxxc2014 +1

    @aeroguy – free trade is extra-logical and I’m wondering if creating positive liberties is mandatory for any reactionary government. On the trade issue, take the comparison between the non-slave owning north and the slave owning south – who benefited from not importing slaves? or how about Jews in medeival England who would not give up their positive liberties of passage and money lending etc to take up farming? Good choice or not? Sometimes a correctly placed block against trade or activities can create a stone against which society can be sharpened.

    Aeroguy Reply:

    Or the extra metabolic burden of being a warm blooded critter 65 million years ago. I see your point, though I doubt the actors had the foresight to see the advantages for what they were, rather it was the equivalent of diverse speciation. More than any specific mutation, maintaining diverse political speciation is what’s desirable (something, to borrow the thermodynamic analogy, which would require energy being pumped into the system). The analysis of kings vs barons is quite good though, and VXXC takes it a step further by applying it to present conditions. What, if anything, can be done to inhibit the trend to centralization which to my knowledge has only ever been destroyed by collapse under it’s own weight?

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 10:28 pm Reply | Quote
  • Kwisatz Haderach Says:

    The Jews vs Israel dynamic has been going on for a long time.

    In this remarkable interview with Ariel Sharon, dated 17 Dec 1982, that dynamic is in full play.

    “Let me tell me [sic] what is the most important thing, the sweetest fruit of the war in Lebanon: It is that now they don’t just hate Israel. Thanks to us, they now also hate all those Feinschmecker Jews in Paris, London, New York, Frankfurt and Montreal, in all their holes. At last they hate all these nice Yids, who say they are different from us, that they are not Israeli thugs, that they are different Jews, clean and decent. Just like the assimilated Jew in Vienna and Berlin begged the anti-Semite not to confuse him with the screaming, stinking Ostjude, who had smuggled himself into that cultural environment out of the dirty ghettos of Ukraine and Poland. It won’t help them, those clean Yids, just as it did not help them in Vienna and Berlin. Let them shout that they condemn Israel, that they are all right, that they did not want and don’t want to hurt a fly, that they always prefer being slaughtered to fighting, that they have taken it upon themselves to teach the gentiles how to be good Christians by always turning the other cheek. It won’t do them any good. Now they are getting it there because of us, and I am telling you, it is a pleasure to watch.”

    [Reply]

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    Meant to link: http://wotraceafg.voila.net/interview.htm

    [Reply]

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    Actually, ouch, I just Snopes’d myself. That interview was misattributed to Sharon.

    http://rense.com/general25/betteralive.htm

    [Reply]

    E. Antony Gray (@RiverC) Reply:

    Yikes, though let me say, among other enemies, the Jews seem to have a good record of being their own worst one.

    I work with a Jew and he apparently voted for Obama. Interesting to see how loyalties play out in the guy. Apparently he discovered that being a Jew and being a Democrat are two different things. WELP

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    A big mistake I see in the alt-right spheres is that there is a deep cynicism in jewish diaspora motives. Sailer does this; lots of fine writers and thinkers do this. They impute the motives of Israeli nationalists to the jews of the NYT and SPLC. It’s a very bad fit. Most of these ultra-SWPL davoise “Feinschmecker” jews (I love that term…I’m going to use it all the time) don’t particularly care about zionism or Israeli nationalism. Is it so hard to believe? Do we impute hidden Irish nationalism to american catholics? I know it’s not the quite the same, but the point is that religions don’t usually inspire loyalty as well as blood and soil do.

    So, if jews are a monolith, then these Feinschmekers are acting against their interests. If jews aren’t a monolith, (and I believe that they aren’t), then it’s more accurate to say that different jews just have different interests.

    Posted on March 29th, 2015 at 11:04 pm Reply | Quote
  • In the Footsteps of Zheng He | wasenlightened Says:

    […] link in Nick Land’s weekly “Chaos Patch” roundup: A dustup in Kenya involving a Chinese restauranteur accused of excluding […]

    Posted on March 30th, 2015 at 12:32 am Reply | Quote
  • RorschachRomanov Says:

    Speaking of Leftism and the increasing impossibility of demarcating POE from actual, the following videos are intensely humorous and brilliantly satirical. They are well worth binge watching in order (amounting to eight minutes or so). I love how the series evolves towards dark apocalypticism!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFxdQ6ey-20
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKqOczjubxo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRA0V77igpc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u66G0Mmtxk

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 30th, 2015 at 1:25 am Reply | Quote
  • SanguineEmpiricist Says:

    http://www.vince-inc.com/vincent/

    This is one of my favorite philosophers and certainly one of the most formidable. Editor-in-chief of Synthese

    my nigga hendrick’s

    http://www.vince-inc.com/vincent/
    https://railct.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/screen-shot-2012-02-22-at-2-59-03-pm.png
    http://universitypost.dk/files/universitetsavisen.dk/pictures/professor_vincent_hendricks01.jpg

    This is so satisfying to me you have no idea.

    [Reply]

    Balthazar Reply:

    He wound up taking that last photo down and apologizing.

    [Reply]

    SanguineEmpiricist Reply:

    Something tells me he didn’t mean it.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 30th, 2015 at 1:37 am Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    I don’t have a problem reading Lovecraft as a reactionary since he essentially describes himself as such. On one level, every great writer is a reactionary, trying to re-enforce truth while the minions of humanity — their name is legion for they are many — try to distract with irrelevant directions and lies.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 30th, 2015 at 2:59 am Reply | Quote
  • Anonymous Says:

    Contrarian take on Lee Kuan Yew:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dqaqKrVw3w

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    This guy is a great orator. Though he reminds me of reading Krugman at his most annoying: 50% right, 50% wrong and sometimes episodes of right and wrong existing within the same sentence.

    [Reply]

    Izak Reply:

    This video sucked. I thought he was going to be like some normal 13 year old and just talk about how Lee Kuan Yew wasn’t cool because he didn’t party, skateboard, or eat pizza.

    Instead, he did what Asians always do: he outdid white people at their own game. And the game in question, of course, was being an insufferably obnoxious leftist. Although I give him props for managing to viciously insult Lee Kuan Yew, Jesus of Nazareth, and your parents all in the same video (I only saw half, so who knows what other sacred cows this free-thinking renegade managed to destroy in his smashing spree of iconoclastic fury). It’s like the political version of those Japanese kids who videotape themselves beating Super Mario 2 in like 20 seconds or whatever.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Yes that was the 50% that was wrong. 50% of 8 minutes is 4 minutes of wrong-ness. So there was a lot of that in here.

    [Reply]

    Izak Reply:

    Hey, wait a minute!

    His last name is like how I pronounce Gnon!

    What the…!

    Izak Reply:

    All hail William Ngan!

    Singapore’s very own bizarro-Gnon.

    Balthazar Reply:

    He has since been arrested.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 30th, 2015 at 4:14 am Reply | Quote
  • vxxc2014 Says:

    “In business, people often seek out a white person to act as a front, just to be taken seriously.”

    For instance American Governance.

    But yes it’s true in the former commonwealth as well.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 31st, 2015 at 12:54 am Reply | Quote
  • Balthazar Says:

    From the piece about Cameroonian Jean-Pierre Bekolo

    Let’s not forget that we didn’t create our countries. Cameroon is a Western invention: its territory, its laws, its cities – Yaoundé and Douala – all of it. Even its name. White people named it after the Portuguese word for shrimp (camaroes), and we’re proud of that name. How can we hope to make it when we live in a colonial shell, empty of all content, because those who made that content – our very state – have jumped ship?

    I always try to keep this reality in mind when fellow Hispanics try to shame me for not speaking Spanish. The contradiction inherent in their burning pride for that white language – in America – at the expense of another white language just does not occur to them.

    Back to Jean-Pierre, and the greater African political question, I am left wondering what borders respectful of tribe and geography might do for the continent. Given the fact that no proper governments exist at all, such reshuffling is a non-trivial but perfectly feasible course of action. If anyone is to flesh out a clearer vision of re-colonization, this may be something to consider.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 31st, 2015 at 3:20 am Reply | Quote
  • vxxc2014 Says:

    @Kwisatz Haderach Brilliant.

    ” Do we impute hidden Irish nationalism to american catholics? I know it’s not the quite the same, but the point is that religions don’t usually inspire loyalty as well as blood and soil do. ”

    I’m American Irish Catholic [of Feinan stock] and that’s the best counter I’ve heard yet.

    Because no the Israelis aren’t the American Jews, and the Cathedral isn’t the Synagogue any more than the American Mafia aka La Cosa Nostra is Jewish.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 31st, 2015 at 2:52 pm Reply | Quote
  • SanguineEmpiricist Says:

    http://insidebitcoins.com/news/rakuten-announces-multi-sig-escrow-support-30-percent-bitcoin-discount/31221

    Japenese retailer with multi-sig escrow and 30% btc discount.

    [Reply]

    Posted on March 31st, 2015 at 6:16 pm Reply | Quote
  • The Smoke Says:

    @
    Hey Guys,
    I have tried to address this in some other places, but it instantly gets censored or downvoted. You seem to be more my kind of crazy, so I give it a try:

    Though not an active gamer I like to read gaming news frequently to see what is out there and maybe try something out once in a while. I have been looking mainly at Kotaku, and RockPaperShotgun. Now both websites have picked up the cause of fighting misrepresentation of women in video games and also address other issues in an ideological way. While putting games in a societal context might be interesting here and there, it starts to annoy and sometimes upset me.
    Is anybody of you interested in gaming-related things and maybe knows some sites which are more indifferent/care more about the quality of the games than their impact on culture?

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 2nd, 2015 at 11:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • Thule Says:

    @The Smoke

    Go to Reaxxion.com

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 21st, 2015 at 6:29 am Reply | Quote

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