Chaos Patch (#67)

(Open thread + links)

How reality was lost. Pieces of empire. Roosh gets serious. Amerika versus patchwork (relevant). Acid overdose. Powertalk. Ideology and reality. The fall. Exposed. Friday fragments. The weekly round.

The cancer is strong. Social democracy’s continental redoubt. American anti-politics. Russian Disney militarism. Germans have had enough. Economic Alamos. Just wait.

Killing twitter to ‘save’ it. Bloggers are giving up. How ‘news’ is made at the NYT.

Symmetrical terrors. Assimilation. Peak confusion. Motivated misunderstanding. Cultural terminus.

Gene screening for kids. The biology of slavery. Stix on Slager. Ethnic cleansing in the DR.

Printing the future. Ethereum’s escape plans.

Keith Preston interviewed on the deep state, and more (audio).

June 21, 2015admin 24 Comments »
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24 Responses to this entry

  • Chaos Patch (#67) | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 10:44 am Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Thank you for the links, and a great collection of stuff to read. I find it interesting that as the signs of collapse mount like an enemy fleet on the horizon, the response has been doubling-down on the narrative, which only makes sense if people are using it to bolster their self-esteem by considering their lives “good” because they comply.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    signs of collapse mount like an enemy fleet on the horizon

    LOL.

    re: the Amerika article.

    So many words to state you want something different. Who is that written for?

    What about insight porn? From a fitness standpoint, figuring stuff out is step one in implementing what you’ve figured out. We are flooded with insight around here (seriously. I sometimes laugh when people decry the decline of NRx. Have you tried to read anything that anyone else is trying to do. It’s shamefully bad.). But we don’t do nothing. Now, we think we have very, very good reasons for not doing anything.

    But we know that smart people are also very good at rationalizing what they want to do. Have we just come up with an excuse for hacking our insight-implementation system to get all the insight dopamine without any tedious intervals of doing stuff? -lesser bull

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Brett makes good points in his analysis of the weaknesses of the Moldbug patchwork concept, but the desire for a revival of kingdoms as the best governmental form …. I don’t see how that logically evolves out of existing western political forms. What we have instead are various private semi-kingdoms (i.e. private businesses) and hierarchical clubs and voluntary associations.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    Brett makes good points in his analysis of the weaknesses of the Moldbug patchwork concept

    Which, like analyzing the weaknesses of anarcho-capitalism, has little value outside of an exercise in argumentation.

    Lesser Bull Reply:

    I was nodding along with that great quote you found, then I saw it was me.

    Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 1:04 pm Reply | Quote
  • Alex Says:

    Catholic taxonomy goes berserk as neo-integrists rally to the postmodern reactionary Pope. (Nihil obstat from Shea.)

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Okay this was a good piece. But it does raise the question of what the Catholics are offering here that is particularly unique. What Francis is proposing could be described as a “stop and smell the roses” approach for retaining the ability to experience awe in the face of nature.

    Heidegger wrote almost the same exact thing in The Question Concerning Technology 60 years ago, and he’s an existentialist.

    LSD’s entire raison d’etre is to shake one out of one’s experiential torpor and make the roses etc come alive, thereby re-engaging one’s capacity for joy and wonderment.

    The New Agers and meditation-ers are all about cultivating practices to achieve exactly the sorts of experiential ends Francis is espousing.

    And if you actually go to a Catholic mass you are liable to get out of it … nothing. As an experience it tends to be awful, with screaming babies, public service announcements and Vietnamese priests who can barely speak English.

    Joseph Campbell was all over this problem. He saw that the Church was not putting out good product on Sundays anymore because it no longer placed a high-enough value on the mystical element in the ritual.

    I don’t mean to harsh on the Catholics here. Francis is asking the right question. The point is that I don’t think the Catholics are offering a quality product in response. Mostly because they are putting least-common-denominator inclusiveness ahead of quality control in structuring their services.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    To be clear, “going down the rabbit hole” is not reading the linked post.

    Heidegger wrote almost the same exact thing in The Question Concerning Technology 60 years ago, and he’s an existentialist.

    Apparently, many Catholics have been writing about this long before that:

    “power is never considered in terms of the responsibility of choice which is inherent in freedom” since its “only norms are taken from alleged necessity, from either utility or security”. -ROMANO GUARDINI

    The point is that I don’t think the Catholics are offering a quality product in response. Mostly because they are putting least-common-denominator inclusiveness ahead of quality control in structuring their services.

    The price of understanding capitalism certainly is not universalism.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    And if you actually go to a Catholic mass you are liable to get out of it … nothing. As an experience it tends to be awful, with screaming babies, public service announcements and Vietnamese priests who can barely speak English. … Francis is asking the right question. The point is that I don’t think the Catholics are offering a quality product in response. Mostly because they are putting least-common-denominator inclusiveness ahead of quality control in structuring their services.

    The Catholic Mass is sufficiently numinous on those occasions when the vernacular isn’t an issue. Sadly Francis has made it clear that he’s no friend of that venerable rite.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 1:05 pm Reply | Quote
  • Kgaard Says:

    Roosh is spot-on with his cultural decline theory. Social Pathologist has upped the ante with this great piece:

    http://socialpathology.blogspot.com/2015/06/carnal-lite-ii-virtues-of-eros.html

    He argues (channeling Heartiste) that the ability to seduce women must now be considered a VIRTUE — perhaps the highest virtue — on the grounds that a big cause of western decline is that sexual polarity itself has collapsed (as both sexes become merged into a metrosexual blob).

    Collapse in sexual polarity = less sexual attraction = fewer babies. The Telegraph had an interesting piece on the speed of population collapse in Germany:

    “The German government expects the population to shrink from 81m to 67m by 2060 as depressed pockets of the former East Germany go into “decline spirals” where shops, doctors’ practices, and public transport start to shut down, causing yet more people to leave in a vicious circle. Germany’s leaders are themselves acutely conscious that their current hegemonic position in Europe is largely a mirage, certain to fade as more powerful historical currents come to the fore.”

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    Read more as

    Romantic dismissal of capitalism based on aesthetic revulsion to mass consumer culture, on the other hand, is no more than the pathetic squawk of a hypnotized prey animal. -admin

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Yeah that is also a valid analysis. Capital eats culture. And due to the never-endingly voracious logic of capitalism, it can NEVER STOP eating culture. (The Ouroboros insight … i.e. if your market stops growing you don’t suffer a decline in profit margins, you STARVE.)

    This is an interesting interview on Red Ice Radio with a footsoldier in the BNP party who arrived at the same conclusion: He wanted to blame immigration for Britain’s problems but the harder he dug into the problem the more he realized that capitalism was a sort of algorhythym that necessitated relentless immigration. Dude ended up leaving the BNP over this insight.

    http://www.redicecreations.com/radio/2015/06/RIR-150619.php

    “Matthew Tait joined the British National Party (BNP) at age 18 and founded a local party branch from scratch. He has stood for election at the local and national level on many occasions and faced persecution in the press and at work. Matt went on to found Western Spring, a fast growing ‘post-Nationalist’ community group who advocates innovative strategies to further the cause of Western Civilization and the European people.”

    Still suffers from the same problem, of course, romanitic dismissal of capitalism.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    If interested, follow Alex’s rabbit hole. Appears the Catholics have been aware for awhile.

    Chris B Reply:

    Romantic dismissal of capitalism based on aesthetic revulsion to mass consumer culture, on the other hand, is no more thanthe pathetic squawk of a hypnotized prey animal.”

    and

    “. if your market stops growing you don’t suffer a decline in profit margins, you STARVE.)”

    The NRx idea of putting someone, anyone, in charge is to be able to ride this crap out, surely? Capitalism in its current guise must be recognised as a result of lack of control. The current system insecure control would surely be celebrated by anyone wanting out of control capitalism? Inability to halt any activity due to need to bribe out of control population? – check.
    Desperate juicing of spending to keep the wheels on? check. The must be many more ways an in control society is antithetical to capitalism.

    [Reply]

    Hurlock Reply:

    I must have missed the moment when you became a socialist.

    What does an “in control” society means, and what it is opposed to “capitalism”.

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    @team red or team blue? Don’t you think it is funny how modern a concept capitalism is? That should be thought about. I mean, surely the real start point is the various companies (like the EIC) floated on the stock exchange. Companies created on capital become kind of rogue entities whose whole telos is more acquisition with control kind of limited. I mean, a company has to go where profit is or die. It only after this that capitalism becomes an issue (despite capitalist type enterprise before this.)

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 1:49 pm Reply | Quote
  • vlahvlahvlah Says:

    Still wallowing in noting. You had that post a while back, about accidental hacks to reward mechanisms. You missed a very obvious one, probably because it was right under your nose: neoreaction.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 5:33 pm Reply | Quote
  • Erebus Says:

    Order from chaos. Powertalk. The highest virtue. I came across this little story earlier this week, and I think that it’s worth sharing… even though it’s from Nodker, and thus may be apocryphal.

    When the individual kings of the Northmen sent him gold and silver as a token of their devotion, and their swords to mark their eternal subjection and submission, King Charlemagne ordered that the money be thrown on the floor, be viewed by everyone with contempt, and be trodden underfoot like dirt. He ordered the swords to be brought to him on his high throne, however, so he could test them for himself. At that point the envoys were fearful that some suspicion of mischief might arise against them, and they presented the swords to the emperor in the way that servants hand knives to their lords, that is, by the tip. He took one of them by the hilt and tried to bend one end back to touch the other, but it broke between his hands, which were stronger than the iron. Then one of the envoys drew his own sword from its sheath and offered it in the obsequious manner of servants. “Lord,” he said, “as I believe, this sword will be found as tough and as flexible as your ever-victorious right hand could wish.” Caesar accepted it, and he was truly caesar, as Isaiah had prophesised: “Look to the rock from which you were hewn.” Alone of all the people of Germany, by God’s craftsmanship, he rose in skill and spirit to the level of the ancients. Holding the hilt of the sword he bent back the tip like a twig, and then let it slowly return to its original shape. The envoys gasped at each other in amazement and uttered, “O, if only gold seemed so vile to our princes, and steel so precious!”

    (NB: Good steel tends to be flexible, and the broad-bladed slashing swords of Charlemagne’s time had flat cross-sections, so that era’s good swords were supple, and could evidently be test by being bent and returning to their original shape.)

    If our decaying society needs anything, it needs leaders of men who see and speak the truth; who value steel and honor, and show contempt for gold. Has even one such man emerged over the past 70 years? Politics, these days, seems to attract the very worst of men.

    …We may not be able to escape the event-horizon described by Malcolm Pollack. Odds are that we’re already well past the point of no return — and picking up speed. If we’re lucky, there’ll be men like Charlemagne on the other side.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 5:35 pm Reply | Quote
  • Nick B. Steves Says:

    That was Roosh getting serious… over a year ago. And since? Verdict is still out I think.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    True dat. The neomasculinity push seems rather leaden.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 7:39 pm Reply | Quote
  • Aeschylus Says:

    SA’s continued engagement with NRx is both fascinating and intensely aggravating. In this latest foray, for example, he lists many “symmetries” between the extreme right and left which are obviously not symmetrical at all (as some commenters pointed out) or rely on the fallacious premise of Nationalsozialismus being right-wing and traditionalist. The biggest problem, of course, is his continued insistence on denying that the left is in power–as though the majority of Congress being white meant anything.

    How many people still think there is hope for Scott? Having a social circle made entirely of leftists probably isn’t doing him any favors…

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 21st, 2015 at 8:49 pm Reply | Quote
  • E. Antony Gray (@RiverC) Says:

    Whittle’s subtlety here is interesting. Get past the tea party rah-rah

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB3BcUKmSlo

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 22nd, 2015 at 3:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • freihals Says:

    Complex systems are emergent; they cannot be designed or controlled. Ethereum may be a catalysis to a decentralized world of interaction.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 24th, 2015 at 12:12 am Reply | Quote

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