Chaos Patch (#95)

Last and most radically-degenerated Yule Chaos Patch. Back in Shanghai a couple of hours ago, with no idea at all what is happening in the world or (roughly equivalently) on the Internet. Feel free to fill in any of the most absurd gaps.

Here are a couple of very recent discussion points: Refragmentation. The advantages of repressive state religion.

January 3, 2016admin 36 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos

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36 Responses to this entry

  • The Electric Philosopher Says:

    Well I’m just going to take shameless advantage of the situation and post links to my reviews of Phyl-Undhu and Chasm:

    http://the-electric-philosopher.blogspot.co.uk/2015/12/phyl-undhu-by-nick-land-review.html

    http://the-electric-philosopher.blogspot.co.uk/2015/12/chasm-by-nick-land-review.html

    [Reply]

    Child of Parent Reply:

    I’ve also just finished reading Chasm. A review will coalesce itself shortly. In the mean time, I would like to hear more about this (taken from the appendix):

    > 111 – Sexual repression, pushed to an extreme, advances the mechanics of abstract literature. Puritanism is here set to dark work. Lovecraft (once again) exhibits the pattern. Whatever hides can be latched onto other hidden things.

    This is Foucault’s Repressive Hypothesis is it not? Is the point to withhold the reveal? To deny it, so that it may hyper-focus our attention upon it? Can we do more than just suppress the reveal? Can we deny its existence altogether?

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 3:09 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    https://www.rt.com/usa/327762-armed-bundy-militia-oregon-ranchers/

    Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy’s three sons and “about 150” militiamen have occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge HQ to protest the pending imprisonment of two Oregon ranchers accused of arson, arguing the federal government has no authority in local cases.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 3:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • Rasputin Says:

    Better than Idaho:

    http://amazinguniverse.net/there-is-a-secret-network-of-psychedelic-temples-hidden-beneath-the-alps/

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Beautiful. I’m always amazed at the recurrence and consistency of psychedelic imagery across time and geography. It’s as if when you get a human into a psychedelic zone the same kinds of images are spontaneously vomited forth (often literally) by the mind. The ayahuasca-fueled art of the Amazon looks a lot like the stuff in this Italian Alps cave. Ditto much Islamic art.

    Perhaps not coincidentally, here is Italian futurist Joseph Stella from the 1920s … I think he was baked when he created this. The tip-off is the eyes of the Madonna:

    http://www.arts-wallpapers.com/galleries/joseph_stella/imagepages/image21.htm

    This painting is in the High Museum in Atlanta. Very powerful.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 4:09 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Most interesting article of the week:

    http://tech.slashdot.org/story/16/01/02/0119259/irans-blogfather-facebook-instagram-and-twitter-are-killing-the-web

    Consolidation = entropy.

    [Reply]

    grey enlightenment Reply:

    how can it kill the web when it’s a part of the web? As Facebook, Amazon, and Google can attest, the web is healthier than ever. Hyperlinks are still used everywhere and have not been devalued. Waitbutwhy articles for example are shared thousands of times on Facebook and social media though links that lead back to the site.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 5:01 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Another useful piece: William S. Burroughs on Mexico and how third-world nations run themselves.

    http://penetrate.blogspot.com/2015/12/william-s-burroughs-on-mexicans-and.html

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 5:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • Kwisatz Haderach Says:

    Refragmentation is an essay I know I will be coming back to over time.

    One crucial corporation which he spared from his relentless analysis was the government. He dog-whistles it, for those who are clued in, with this:

    Many of the mid-century oligopolies had been anointed by the federal government…This didn’t seem as dubious to government officials at the time as it sounds to us. They felt a two-party system ensured sufficient competition in politics. It ought to work for business too.

    Consider that sovereign powers are corporations whose product is organized violence. From this perspective, they are no different than other corporations. The WashCorp model is the vertically integrated model, a historically contingent “evolutionary phase”, replete with the same efficiencies as the 1928-era Ford Motor Corporation and doomed to the same fate. The Al-Qaeda – Hizbollah model is the future of organized violence: contractors and sub-contractors selling individual components of organized violence. This critical lens also fortells the doom of Islamic State, as they are striving to evolve into a dinosaur just a few moments before Chicxulub is scheduled to land.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    Consider that sovereign powers are corporations whose product is organized violence.

    Considered. Consider that this analysis is not only shallow, but harmful.

    WashCorp’s products are public services (welfare) and order (administrative and judicial). Comparing them to guerilla AQ or Hezbollah is ludicrous. And you do realize that when AQ turns from guerilla to ruling, they try to provide the same aformentioned services?

    If you are saying the future looks like a bunch of guerilla AQ providing “organized violence,” (aka Afghan warlords) over domains that have (unlike Afghanistan) valuable resources and pliable terrain, they are prime “acquisition” targets of future “1928-era Ford Motor Corporation” and quite unlikely to last. IOW, they would create the environment for the “historically contingent ‘evolutionary phase'” you say brought about WashCorp.

    [Reply]

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    You may not like the equation of sovereignty with violence, but it isn’t an NRx concept – that dates back to Weber (or Hobbes).

    Let me try to come at this from a different direction. The first thing to understand is that 1928-era FMC doesn’t exist any more. There is an organization that has the name Ford Motor Corporation, but it functions nothing like the vertically-integrated conglomerate of Henry Ford’s design.

    By analogy, in the future there will probably still be a corporation named WashCorp. But it will not function like the current WashCorp. It may still have a monopoly on legitimate violence within its territory, as FMC still produces cars and trucks, but it will not produce that violence, nor any of the other intercolary products that are necessary to that violence, (such as indoctrination or taxes), in the same way that WashCorp 1.0 now does it.

    The interesting question is not whether Hezbollah or AQ attempts to become a vertically integrated mega-state. Maybe it does – I would be interested to read any examples you can cite about how they are trying to do that – but for the sake of discussion, let’s grant that they do it. All that would demonstrate is that AQ does not understand the reasons for its limited success. It believes an internal narrative about itself, e.g., that God has ordained its victory, and does not critically reflect on its strategy.

    No series of events could have prevented the hollowing out and restructuring of the FMC. Capitalism in the Ribbon Farm sense [1] is not something that can be resisted by policy, and capitalism in the Ribbon Farm sense is what led to FMC 2.0. And similarly, sovereignty 1.0 will not resist 2.0. (Or if you go by Lind, sovereignty 3.0 will not resist sovereignty 4.0).

    [1] http://www.ribbonfarm.com/2015/10/06/alice-and-bob-discover-capitalism/

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    “It believes an internal narrative about itself, e.g., that God has ordained its victory, and does not critically reflect on its strategy.”

    This is also true of WashCorp though.

    Different T Reply:

    Thanks for the link.

    You may not like the equation of sovereignty with violence, but it isn’t an NRx concept – that dates back to Weber (or Hobbes).

    There are no problems with equating sovereignty with violence. The problem is stating the product of govt is violence. In fact; the govt would likely wish to never be violent, instead receiving voluntary compliance. And this is usually what happens. For this complicity, the products are those services mentioned earlier.

    I would be interested to read any examples you can cite about how they are trying to do that

    You can look into Afghanistan pre 2001 for the best example of AQ rule I know of.

    All that would demonstrate is that AQ does not understand the reasons for its limited success. It believes an internal narrative about itself, e.g., that God has ordained its victory, and does not critically reflect on its strategy.

    Not sure what this is getting at? Since you seem to be implying (?) AQ doesn’t exist because it wants to rule, what do you think the “reasons for its limited success” are?

    No series of events could have prevented the hollowing out and restructuring of the FMC. Capitalism in the Ribbon Farm sense [1] is not something that can be resisted by policy, and capitalism in the Ribbon Farm sense is what led to FMC 2.0. And similarly, sovereignty 1.0 will not resist 2.0. (Or if you go by Lind, sovereignty 3.0 will not resist sovereignty 4.0).

    Not sure what this is either.

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 5:30 pm Reply | Quote
  • Richard Peterson Says:

    Refragmentation was good, but I found his other January 2016 essay, Economic Inequality, to be more interesting in subtext. Namely, that he was willing to say this aloud:

    Louis Brandeis said “We may have democracy, or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can’t have both.” That sounds plausible. But if I have to choose between ignoring him and ignoring an exponential curve that has been operating for thousands of years, I’ll bet on the curve. Ignoring any trend that has been operating for thousands of years is dangerous. But exponential growth especially tends to bite you.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 6:23 pm Reply | Quote
  • Chaos Patch (#95) | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 7:24 pm Reply | Quote
  • Different T Says:

    This is also true of WashCorp though.

    That seems to be his major point. This is a really strange way to get there though.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    “That seems to be his major point.”

    Not really. He’s saying that change in the structure of WashCorp will be isomorphic to change in the structure of Ford, while Al Qaeda is cucked because it has a rigid, non-adaptive theological conception of its purpose. However, WashCorp has succeeded in cornering the global market on violence despite ALSO having a theological conception of its destiny, and this stands in need of explanation. WashCorp is at least as much like Al Qaeda as it is like Ford.

    Another explanation for Al Qaeda’s decline contra ISIS is that it doesn’t get as much support from Qatar, Turkey, KSA and Israel as the latter does.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    The Al-Qaeda – Hizbollah model is the future of organized violence: contractors and sub-contractors selling individual components of organized violence.

    What is then? Why are they “violence contractors” not ruling?

    [Reply]

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    Why are they “violence contractors” not ruling?

    “Hah! Why isn’t the Ford Motor Corporation smelting its own iron? This proves that the FMC isn’t a real car company!”

    Different T Reply:

    That’s what I thought you meant.

    Consider that they are motivated to be “violence contractors” because they want to rule. This is readily apparent throughout human history and not just with the religious.

    And still unanswered: If you are saying the future looks like a bunch of guerilla AQ providing “organized violence,” (aka Afghan warlords) over domains that have (unlike Afghanistan) valuable resources and pliable terrain, they are prime “acquisition” targets of future “1928-era Ford Motor Corporation” and quite unlikely to last. IOW, they would create the environment for the “historically contingent ‘evolutionary phase’” you say brought about WashCorp.

    Aren’t you just repackaging the old Austrian DRO?

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    @GB

    I don’t think that WashCorp is as theologically bound as you think they are. Some parts, yes. Barack Obama is.

    But other parts – particularly in the deep state – are already there, pretty much. Can you imagine Gen. MacArthur allowing critical targets to be protected by Blackwater contractors? Or have them fighting No, if he were in command of WashCorp Army Division® ©2015, he would not countenance Blackwater contractors. Instead, he would form his legions of fat latina paper pushers into ranks and march them into the battle of Fallujah, whereupon they would be slaughtered on national television and he would be sacked in disgrace. Then someone else would move in and start talks with the Blackwater folks. That is what I mean by the inevitability of this process.

    Even the Trump phenomenon has a parallel in this analogy. Think of him as a corporate raider who is coming in to bust up the vertically integrated dinosaur.

    [Reply]

    Different T Reply:

    This is perhaps the strangest way to just state that you think the government will award contracts for certain things.

    Which is why the Trump analogy is out of place and doesn’t work.

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    I think it will be more than just contracting out certain functions. I think they’ll have to give up on certain functions too. They’re not just too large vertically, but also horizontally.

    Anyway, none of my ideas are new ones. I was just making the connection between Graham’s refragmentation and Lind’s concept of non-state actors / 4GW.

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    I already spelled this out on this very blog a long time ago. We need to privatise the government. Nothing should be public. There is no public.

    Xoth Reply:

    Good points. It also raises the issue that the concept of a “citizen of the state” differs strongly between then and now. Maybe the fat latina paper pushers of yore would have marched if asked. Modern vulgar (media force fed) thought seems to make a strong distinction between governments and citizens; defeat the former but invite the latter.

    Posted on January 3rd, 2016 at 10:38 pm Reply | Quote
  • Different T Says:

    There is no public.

    But there is a “we,” boys; there is a “we.”

    Fuck.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    “We” sounds pretty spooky to me.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 4th, 2016 at 12:28 am Reply | Quote
  • tentative joiner Says:

    >FILED UNDER Chaos
    >TAGGED WITH Admin, Religion, Fragmentation
    This seems like the perfect place from which to link to https://gist.github.com/anonymous/6027f0bf8e9fba486e98, a product of reading Fanged Noumena while sleep-deprived. The script converts decimal numerical input to the notation from Admin’s philosophical found footage horror, Tic-Talk. The inverse conversion is left as an exercise to the reader.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    one of two, or you do not understanding Fanged Noumena very well, or you typed this scrypt in Darkness.

    [Reply]

    tentative joiner Reply:

    It is surely a bit of a provocation to say that and then not explain why.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    error: “801693b1d56b19d77272b3c6db46a751def” after # is not a positive integer

    so that is about Darkness, when it is dark in the room it is easy to make typo, regarding Fanged Noumena, it is true because hardly anyone can understand it completely.

    Tentative Joiner Reply:

    >hardly anyone can understand it completely
    Oh, I agree. I am by no means trying to claim a complete understanding of Fanged Noumena. This is only a token of aesthetic/mathematical appreciation of the Tic Xenotation.

    Posted on January 4th, 2016 at 3:35 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/12082366/German-women-report-string-of-sexual-assaults-by-Arab-and-North-African-men.

    Germany paying the iron price…

    [Reply]

    Tentative Joiner Reply:

    Your link is broken. This one should work:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/12082366/German-women-report-string-of-sexual-assaults-by-Arab-and-North-African-men.html

    [Reply]

    Mark Warburton Reply:

    Cheers!

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 5th, 2016 at 2:17 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    http://libcom.org/library/postmodern-left-success-neoliberalism

    Tying one’s self in knots – some pornc orn like analysis here when Baudrillard gets cross-wired with Marx.

    “If we cannot tell the difference between simulation and reality, we risk descending from a healthy pessimism over the current state of affairs into believing that working class struggles can have no impact simply because it deceptively appears that they don’t.”

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 8th, 2016 at 2:17 am Reply | Quote

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