Disconnection VI

Posted from Tokyo, first time in Japan, which is awesome so far. An open society without being stupid about it would be the NRx fast-summary (sound, but limited). It was vastly easier to get into Japan than the United States.

Staying in the AirB&B equivalent of a coffin-hotel, but the situation is good (in Ueno).

Civilization level meets high expectations, and friendliness level exceeds them.
Much more English signage than expected, and the inherited Chinese characters have preserved their meanings, if not their phonological values, so the urban landscape is surprisingly intelligible.
Micro-artisan businesses of extreme excellence, typically run by elderly people, are everywhere.
Automation dialed up to eleven.
Yet to see a single over-weight person (which out-performs the stereotype).

Ginza:

January 27, 2017admin 76 Comments »
FILED UNDER :World

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76 Responses to this entry

  • orly Says:

    Your sinophilia would make more sense as japanophilia.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 27th, 2017 at 1:28 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    have some fun
    in japan
    but do buy
    in dubay

    seriously, you can get exellent Go set there

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 27th, 2017 at 1:33 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Micro-artisan businesses of extreme excellence, typically run by elderly people, are everywhere.

    This strikes me as the economic model of the future, since it does not make sense to ship everyone to jobs (and jobs are jails anyway, with very few exceptions).

    [Reply]

    smg Reply:

    Related to very little here but interesting. My observation is there’s a future in US in micro-businesses both service & retail. So many big box retailers & malls are closing yet many customers want personal service & the experience of shopping. Many independent books stores were driven out of business by amazon & Barnes & Noble. B&N is now closing stores leaving towns with no bookstore at all (minus libraries). Yes, digital books are a thing, yet people still buy physical books by millions. My guess, micro-shopping will become a thing in US revitalizing local main streets. People value “experience” shopping.

    [Reply]

    Scald85 Reply:

    That’s completely opposite of the truth. People moved to big box corporate stores and indoor malls because they increasingly feared the Diversity in flea markets, or walking down main street. Over time even the massive department stores can’t make it, because people prefer shopping on Amazon instead and completely avoiding the general public as much as possible.

    Hipster blue tribe artisan foofoo is an amusement for lower-tier elites kept around because they’re pleasant, naive, and good looking. Reactionaries and real leftist elites know what a Potemkin show it really is.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    Wrong fear of niggers is one thing amazon aesthete is another thing. amazon is convenient for a lot of things the way wall mart was and still can be. That hardly means people want to buy everything that way, it certainly is not so that one can buy everything that way.What is hard about the model is the cost of retail space in nigger free SWPL areas.This tends to make the boutique selection sort of ridiculous. If niggers were eliminated we would shop like the 1950s again as many of us do in non nigger non SWPL towns already

    A.B. Prosper Reply:

    Scald85 has a point.

    Japan is basically homogeneous and has very low crime and appreciates the old

    Until the US is like that , the best you’ll get is the push carts we have all over California

    Last person I know who ate fruit fro one of those got hepatitis

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 27th, 2017 at 1:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • Abelard Lindsey Says:

    I lived in Japan for 10 years during the 90’s. It had its pluses and minuses. But the author here highlights the pluses perfectly. Yes, there are few fat Japanese. I was shocked at the amount of obesity I saw upon my return to the U.S. in 2001.

    BTW, kana (hiragana and katakana) are phonetic and thus not that difficult to learn. In some ways they are easier to learn than romanji because they are purely phonetic with no exceptions at all. Its actually easier to read Japanese names written in kana than it is in romanji.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 27th, 2017 at 4:29 pm Reply | Quote
  • Wagner Says:

    “Compare the civilisation of the Greeks with what Japan
    or China was at the same period: it’s like comparing the music
    of Beethoven with the screeching of a cat.” – Adolf

    Where did we go wrong?

    [Reply]

    Uriel Fiori Reply:

    “Adolf” is probably a good answer.

    [Reply]

    Phil Reply:

    “Himmler” might be a better one. He was the one who was really nuts. Adolf sounded reasonable by comparison.

    “Why do we call the whole world’s attention to the fact that we have no past? It isn’t enough that the Romans were erecting great buildings when our forefathers were still living in mud huts; now Himmler is starting to dig up these villages of mud huts and enthusing over every potsherd and stone axe he finds. All we prove by that is that we were still throwing stone hatchets and crouching around open fires when Greece and Rome had already reached the highest stage of culture. We really should do our best to keep quiet about this past. Instead Himmler makes a great fuss about it all. The present-day Romans must be having a laugh at these relegations.”

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    Europeans are one race at different points in time we excelled even now eastern europe is the only sane part of europe, while the greeks and roman are basket cases, And its really hard to say who is who and when within the genetic strains of europe. We all have are ethnic affiliations and pet theories but its all pretty sketchy.

    Psudo-chrysostom Reply:

    White on white violence.

    (while non-whites still existed)

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    ““Adolf” is probably a good answer.”

    This is a good question.

    We have two myths here, the Hitler dindu nuffin myth0s and the Jews dindu nuffin myth0s.

    Both myths, both rabble-untruths. Do we find an in-between or is one Right?

    Or is this context Wrong? Is #Gnondead? If we want Truth with an infinitely Capital T, where do we go where we can speak? Japan? Can we speak TTTruth *anywhere*?Internet is the (((nu-Gutenberg))), but is TTTruth possible here? Is asking this question in vain because it’s asked on teh internets. Do they always-already conceal attempts at de-concealment?

    [Reply]

    bomag Reply:

    Aren’t we in an area here where Japan copies what Europe invents and improves a few details?

    Europe has a penchant to burn itself down on a regular basis in search of feelzzz! I’m thinking this indulgence should taper off, but maybe it is baked in too deep.

    [Reply]

    Kevin C. Reply:

    “Where did we go wrong?”

    Probably in letting Plato’s castles-in-the-air metaphysical obsession win over the human-focused philosophies of those derided as the “sophists” (thanks, again, to the victorious party writing most of the surviving records), those latter being the closest the West ever came to the likes of the Ruists (The “Confucians”). If only there could have been a Xunzi of the West…

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    Kevin–more on the Plato/Xunzi discrepancy? Never read the latter, looks interesting.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    You might be interested in Jordan Peterson he likes to say that the language of science/philosophy is contained in the reality of the lived world. He means to say that the measured world can not be more real that what confines it.something something Wittgenstein- ok so Im not a philosopher ask Land.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07Ys4tQPRis

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    Been seeing lots of men on the right heart-eyed over him but something rubs me wrong about him, I don’t trust him. I think part of his rhetorical effect is that he’s a tenured professor so people are fanning him with ferns, perhaps to turn an ember into a flame. Look! A Hi-Status Cathedralist stabbing his comrades in the back wew what a spectacle.

    collen ryan Reply:

    I wouldnt count us out China steals all our tech, and like the jews parasitically exploits the world we built. jettison the niggers and lock the slants out of our science and i bet white 10-1 anyday.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 27th, 2017 at 5:40 pm Reply | Quote
  • Rucoi Says:

    Since you’re nearby visit the Tsakki fish market while it’s still there and if you’re up early enough stop by Sushi Dai before the line forms. How I miss rice bowls and beer for breakfast. No country quite matches their cleanliness and customer service although if you were a fly on the wall after hours you might change your opinion.

    Nary a trash bin in sight, no public consumption of food and pristine sparkling store-front glass. The day I returned to the States I was crestfallen ordering a simple tea.

    Most importantly visit Harajuku in Shibuya where an average 4 or 5 lass can make herself look like a 12. Skiing is tops up north if that’s your thing. Enjoy, it’s a weird wild place.

    [Reply]

    Erebus Reply:

    Good recommendations.

    I’d add: If you’re still in town on the 5th, Admin, I’d recommend you go watch some fights. Japan is the best place in the world for that sort of thing; the stadium is small as hell, the guys really show up to fight, public transit gets there easy enough, and the drinks are cheap.

    If you fancy getting out of the city, now’s also a great time of year to drive up to Nagano. Skiing, snow monkeys, and outdoor hot springs, just three hours outside of Tokyo. A fun trip to make.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 12:18 am Reply | Quote
  • YanKEY Says:

    As a Yankee I’m looking forward to a yanked military after the yank key doodle dandy War of 2018 – ? so that we too will lead the walking blind with street braille brilliance and improved transportation infrastructure.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 12:19 am Reply | Quote
  • collen ryan Says:

    I was thinking about Japanese not having a written language yet apparently it was not really until about 1200 they adopted Chinese characters which they use in about 30 different systems that one must guess at as one reads. For instance sometimes they mean what they mean in chinese and sometimes mean what they sound like in Japanese like a letter, but those are only two of about thirty systems you might apply. Im sure its less complicated in practice than it sounds but theirs a system the US imposed after the war and a system that is taught to school children a system that women were allowed to learn.
    Fascinating maybe thats how they got smart you had to be coder material just to be literate. Is there a precedence to go from illiterate to first world in 800 years? Ireland is a possibility, the druids forbade written language but allowed other language to be used so the celts were known to be clever wits and scholars but no written native language.

    [Reply]

    vxxc2014 Reply:

    They were writing in Latin in the 6th century Mr. Ryan, and being hedgerow educated in Latin and Greek later.

    Those were the languages of the educated in Europe at the time.

    National languages don’t come onto the scene until Chaucer and Dante, and by that time Ireland is well into being conquered and reduced.

    So not much can be deduced from the Ireland case.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedge_school

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    My point was some people seem to develop a capacity for language skills before developing a written language, and when they come upon a written language others developed take to it as if a duck to water. However I was thinking more celtic generally than Irish specifically and mispoke,its really hard to say where celticness ends except to say its preserved in the celtic nation farthest west but is certainly the same as the Hallstatt and earlier. that said the irish were writing in native Irish 800 years before Chaucer

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    http://giphy.com/gifs/l4Ho77ZnvjRes42CA

    [Reply]

    Candide III Reply:

    Your knowledge of the history of Japanese writing is definitely faulty.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 12:56 am Reply | Quote
  • Wagner Says:

    If admin aligned with Japan instead of China he would win bigly with the alt-right (I know I know he pretends not to care about them)—–but he cares about China, to a decent degree, because of their sheer numbers, and the alt-right is growing….

    [Reply]

    Bob Reply:

    That seems largely due to some imagined special connection with Japan deriving from the Axis alliance, even though the Nazis had close ties with China and only allied with Japan for practical reasons. Also because China is perceived to be the stronger party and thus a greater potential threat. If you read proto-alt-right people writing during Japan’s economic booms, their attitude towards Japan is similar to the attitude towards China today.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    No its because the Japanese are a warrior culture like most euro cultures were once.Its also because Japan has demonstrated an unwillingness to commit ethnic suicide through immigration of mongrels and apes.And because like other east Asian cultures Japan has demonstrated as high a level of civilizational ability as Europeans, only partly like Europeans to do with cognitive ability. I have never once heard or read it even once that they were allies of germany let alone that that was admirable in itself.
    Their is no such thing as proto alt right as you describe. while it is true Trump and people who thought think like him were at the time worried that Japan was buying up American real estate and companies, that has nothing to do with with alt/right concerns.

    [Reply]

    Bob Reply:

    It has nothing to do with alt-right concerns because the alt-right arose very recently, almost 30 years after Japan’s bubble burst and Japan ceased being regarded as a threat in the popular consciousness.

    By “proto alt-right”, I mean people like Revilo Oliver, Stoddard, Madison Grant, Jack London and other Western racialists that prefigured the alt-right. They, along with more ordinary nationalists and chauvinists, did not have the sort of sanguine attitude towards Japan that their counterparts today tend to have. Japan was viewed like China is today.

    Ackshually Reply:

    I think its got less to do with a reactionary appreciation of Japan’s ancient history and more to do with the fact that the alt-right is mostly comprised of disaffected NEETs who watch anime and have yellow fever.

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    I don’t think the alt-right is mostly composed of NEETs, it seems to have a significant number of functional people – but yes, disaffected people.

    Wagner Reply:

    Ackshually who you callin a NEET? I’m a cyber-ascetic. I have to admit the daintiness of Asian girls is drool-inducing but I don’t trust their genes enough to breed with one. Then again, looking at the Catheter, ehem, the Cathedral, should I really trust wypipo genes? H/T: Lando.

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    Issue is that Japan doesn’t seem to have the will to win anymore. Once upon a time they did, but now, its only China that has a sense of encompassing desire to “restore the old order” of their dominance. The Japanese appear to lack the drive to prevail.

    [Reply]

    Kevin C. Reply:

    “its[sic] only China that has a sense of encompassing desire to “restore the old order” of their dominance.”

    They may have the desire, but I strongly doubt they have the ability, given the forces arrayed against them and the memetic pressure of the “Universal Culture“.

    And Japan may be rather nice, but that makes it all the more a pity that they’re doomed like the rest of us.

    [Reply]

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    I suspect that HDB facts will resist the forces of the universal culture. There’s much of Western writing that seems to be basically thrashing in anger that China isn’t assimilating fast enough. I do not actually think that China is “resisting” either, so to speak, and maintaining a traditional form. Rather, its transforming into something alien and we can only hope that its incarnation proves both more resilient and more friendly to traditional norms we cherish in its more stable form.

    Saldim Reply:

    The China worship is funny when you consider how its GDP per capita and industrial output per capita are noticeably below America and other Euro lands.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    Certainly there is reason to keep an eye on china and speculate, But as you point out they have a lot to prove ahead of them. They are at the robber barron stage, and while they have the advantage of having watched us do it wrong they cant necessarily thread the needle any better.Meanwhile their Britain has also watched Britain do it wrong so that advantage is a wash. They do have a more pliant people, but thats a two edged sword, whites seem to be the sweet spot between civilized and individualistic.Chinas biggest advantage is no white mans burden, no low IQ savages, and no christian moral burden.

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    How do we rid ourselves of our “christian moral burden”? Self-flagellate? Oh wait.

    bomag Reply:

    The absolute value here is the important thing. They have so many people that per capita measurements are misleading.

    [Reply]

    Saldim Reply:

    Per capita points to the Chinese workers apparently not being as productive as American workers.

    collen ryan Reply:

    I have heard not all those people have those high IQs, I have seen high IQs can be a two edged sword.

    Wagner Reply:

    Right, I have been close with a couple Asians and they’re wicked smart but socially inept. They don’t understand the Tao. IQ has low social IQ, we need to fuse a being-with-others test with the IQ test to get a better idea of who’s who. As my first philosophy professor told me i/r/t analytic philosophy, Life isn’t a fucking math problem.

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 3:30 am Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    isn’t Disconnection usually when commentariat can post some crazy staff and get little wild?

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    Get wild you crazy bastard

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    shooting yourself in leg isn’t crazy or wild

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    Just go bonkers, friend. If you shoot yourself in the leg you shoot yourself in the leg. What’s the point of walking along on two unscathed legs when your spirit is caged?

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 5:16 am Reply | Quote
  • Saldim Says:

    The Japanese fat level isn’t surprising when you consider their crime levels. Their impulse control is apparently a cut above Euros, MENAs, and Negroids.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    zazen meditation – one the greatest things on earth.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 11:52 am Reply | Quote
  • frank Says:

    Can we treat this as an open thread?

    Here’s an interesting report on Russia’s potential employment of private military companies:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQxnAj9fx8g

    Is Putin preparing for the coming proliferation of private sovereign security? A disbanded NATO + subdued Cathedral + realist Putin & Trump ?= blooming fiefdoms in failing states. Interesting times ahead.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    “Can we treat this as an open thread?” — I should already have made that offer.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    In that case
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-01-28/california-threatens-cut-funds-washington

    I think this possibly more interesting than the secession movement in California, This sanctuary city battle is going to get patchwork on the table

    [Reply]

    vxxc2014 Reply:

    Want to see patchwork?

    It’s called Syria. 90+ groups fighting and they all start with local control.

    Which is probably why Assad wins the public opinion polls.

    frank Reply:

    @vxxc

    Want to see patchwork. See Europe circa 500 AD.

    You don’t get speciation without proliferation.

    Posted on January 28th, 2017 at 8:03 pm Reply | Quote
  • Immigration isn’t actually about immigration. – Cardinal Lemon Says:

    […] be a hypocrite but still feel consistent within their world. Do we dislike the Japanese for their immigration policy? Should we? Japan is culturally homogeneous, we all sort know if we go there we will be the odd man […]

    Posted on January 29th, 2017 at 5:28 am Reply | Quote
  • collen ryan Says:

    @

    Youre in the wrong neighborhood pal, we believe the weak should die around here

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    lol I vote *that* as the NRx fast-summary.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 29th, 2017 at 2:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • collen ryan Says:

    I am not sure i want to see “patchwork” as described here it sounds like GATTACA run by SOROS. I mean sure if i get to be Soros, Nor have i seen anything remotely resembling a plan on how to get there from here so it seems about as serious as seasteading with comic con.

    I also think for most places ethnat is the smartest way to go if its not too late, For the US i think we had a 50 patch alliance and that would be easier to rework than figuring out how to build a crypto locked sewer so soros can own us, and if we dont like it we can give up our lives and go live on some other equally odious monsters patch.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 29th, 2017 at 10:26 pm Reply | Quote
  • SanguineEmpiricist Says:

    See Burke
    —-“In a state of nature, it is true, that a man of superior force may beat or rob me; but then it is true, that I am at full liberty to defend myself, or make reprisal by surprise or by cunning, or by any other way in which I may be superior to him.

    But in political society [, outside of the state of nature], a rich man may rob me in another way. [And] I cannot defend myself; for money is the only weapon with which we are allowed to fight [in political society]. If I attempt to avenge myself, the whole force of that society is ready to complete my ruin.” -– Edmund Burke

    I agree with the OP but there’s no where to put this Burke quote, so here it is my ultra-burkeans.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    But notice in that political society where all you are allowed to fight with is money the way they enforce that is by hiring men of superior force.wealth property is the ability to defend something, quickly alliances are thought up, but alliances are fluid. It always comes down to force because someone is always willing to go there if they can.intellect unless it can control the whole board and therefore freeze the game is always vulnerable to a superior force thats dumb as shit that might arise in any number of ways, success usually is the seed of its own demise. Its not that intellect is not a type of power, or perhaps the most valuable asset its that it always comes down to force that cant be argued. Yeah sure intellect wins a lot bet on intellect thats the odds on favorite, until its not. This is why ‘the people’ never are done away with, you cant do it and they are the ultimate force. you can fool them buy them earn their love and respect, intimidate them but eventually they could turn on you.Fortunately they dont want much but people get greedy.

    [Reply]

    Posted on January 29th, 2017 at 11:19 pm Reply | Quote
  • Wagner Says:

    Kinda funny, michael, that Gnon has chosen us to “troll” this place. Being frank, Yarvin is the most sustained and elaborate attempt to Take Over the World and Land is his chief inheritor, so I’m surprised better men than we haven’t been whirring arrows at their edifice. Idk what your game-plan is but mine is decidedly anarchy: Moldy and Lando represent the latest–and thus most fashionable–stage of puritanism (or as NEETchins say nihilism) to light upon our blighted globe; what needs to be done is for it to be killed. Only then can “NRx” rise beyond itself.

    [Reply]

    collen ryan Reply:

    I agree land is something else entirely, We are probably giving him too much credit I think his reactionary cred has steadily declines even if he still is on the security council listserv.Thats not to say Land didnt do some good stuff and doesn’t have a perspective that has to be kept in mind.We are tool making apes whose tools remake us. Any philosophy concerned with reality cant forget this, he just seams to revel in the worst possible outcomes, hes anti human which is of course nuts for a philosopher.
    I think ,what I imagine your preferred flavor reaction is on the ascendancy, I think of it as the heroic reaction HRX as it was cal;led for 15 minutes, its a touch more fashy. I am probably in this camp more than not if Im a neoreactionary at all. Obviously I find much of value in MM and reaction,And yet. it may be because Im a born oppositionalist, or am simply way too alpha to even consider being ruled. But I hope its because I actually have found legitimate reason to question MM orthodoxy.Im sure its partly because Im an engineer not literally but sort of and actually from a long line of them, I mean to say I build things and solve things and neoreaction as some practice it to me is not a serious attempt to prevent the collapse of western civilization and its people. Yeah many of them are as gleeful about its possible demise as most leftists, but other are wasting time we dont have jerking off to seasteading type fantasies, because MM told them politics was folly.Its as if they dont get we are actually dying really quickly its a video game or something to them.Civilizations have faced this point before the answer the correct answer is to fight to the death and hope the gods are on your side. What i hoped once from reaction was some good technical help in that battle.And some help in the aftermath. but they are not serious most of them just kids I guess.You know I agree their is an element to some reactionaries that I can not distinguish from Clinton/Soros. They are cogelites who rule as they see best regardless of the wishes of the proles, land just seems mad he doesnt have a G6 and a Davos slot. Thats not to say as is implied when I say this that Im some democrat socialist, just not into serfdom. Anarchy huh. Oh when I was in my early twenties i liked Ayn rand probably because i saw that as anarchy, guys like me do well in anarchy I would have an army in no time. Thats the problem i think how do you maintain the Anarchy, what if Einstein is not a guy like me or i dont spot him and put him in charge of weapon making.I cant watch my family and freinds all the time. But if youre saying as a white man you demand youre freedom i get that and thats what Im saying. these monarchists say they get it too and we will have more freedom under a king, sorry i think thats unsubstantiated its some internet theory the real life monarchies were done away with for good reasons at least by white men the rest of the world seems ok with being ruled. I see the problems with democracies I think theres probably a better chance of fixing democracies than reinventing the wheel for the west. As you know I call constant bullshit on the claim that its the proles demanding free shit with pitchforks thats fucked up the west, it was more like Clinton/Soros dealing crack to the proles and so now 200 years later they are expecting crack. Most proles just want good government they know damn well they are not up to the task and only rouse themselves to off heads when things get really unbearable, its fucking elites are the problem and the solution republicanism was not a bad idea, greeks romans europe and west have all had some forms and guess what we have done well but its like trying to stabilize one of those subatomic particles. well im rambling maybe theres a king out there we could live under but how longs that last how do we transition to monarchy shites a larp

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    I’m an anarchist in the sense that… think of NRx as the statue of David, only the head is way too bulbous, so might as well bust the whole statue down to splinters and start over again. I want a perfect David, this one is wanting. Only elites can carve the perfect society. All humans are proles but the best of the proles arise to manage the lower, I don’t think this is debatable whatsoever in any human endeavor.

    [Reply]

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    Anarchy has never fully worked, the closest you could get to would be tribal systems but that has innate issues with economies of scale.

    We are self-organizing systems and the weakness of heuristic systems of management is not a hypothetical example, its something empirically established. There’s no real distinction between “Soros giving crack to the masses” and “masses demanding things with pitchforks” as demotism basically is a system of appealing to the masses on a short-term level, with larger longer-term consequences. Democracy particularly encourages this type of behavior and thinking by its nature.

    I don’t know about all of NRX, but there’s at least quite a few of us with a lot of management experience. We’re approaching this from actual knowledge of how our own systems have worked, not because we’re wildly speculating.

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    I’m saying there is a phase of anarchy between Orders, one system needs to be demolished so a better one can take its place.

    [Reply]

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    Sure. Demolish the current order.

    At the end of the day, whatever system that emerges needs to appeal to some overall interest in the human nature, feed bellies and defend against forces of the Other. In the systems I’ve observed, having one or a few charismatic leaders does seem to work remarkably well; there’s a deep seated human desire for a singular, even if he is symbolic, leader.

    Things tend to work well when a coordinated elite that is admired by the proles work to achieve something, and then conceal just enough “secret knowledge” to make their works appear, for lack of a better word, magical. Now, my empirical experience with the real world is that we don’t use the word magical anymore, of course, but that didn’t stop the elite I was with from being credited with “incredible skill” or innate trust. In reality, we had developed a technological solution in secret – an early form of machine learning – and used it internally.

    Peter Thiel said that the best run startups have makings of a cult. I won’t deny it. But what’s also amazing in my experience is how well it works. It truly does turn into something beautiful, with a coordination and sense of identity with the larger whole, while still splintering into just enough “tribes” of sub-leadership, and a distinct and cohesive cultural worldview.

    collen ryan Reply:

    I have managed people all my life as well and built a couple institutions from ground up, I dont disagree entirely with NRX critique of democracy, But excluding niggers of all shades my experience is whites do not want free shit they really have to be manipulated into wanting free shit. However that said democracy is as MM points out rather well designed to do that manipulating.But most systems have been gamed as well. Does Clinton Soros really want the proles to have free shit or do they only do that to become really wealthy and powerful? so what the real problem smart elites or proles?

    Yes Wag we need hierarchy to lead a society.Now how do we keep them from self interest over social interest? MM thinks if Soros can actually own say California he will take good care of it. I dont think so.And besides no one else is going to go for that either so its just garbage. But i disagree with you if you dont think the non elites serve a useful purpose I think they do, and i think its worth about as much as a middle class life in return for hard work. Some average cogs can do better some geniuses are worthless, thats fine too. Scandinavia we used to like to laugh at back in the old days those socialists but you know what until niggerization it wasnt really a problem they would either decide they wanted less socialism or not and less competition for the rest of us. niggerization destroys quickly permanently Ii have watched it it seems most think it was always like this and inevitable this apathy is worse, nothing makes me sicker than the fucking apathy and faggotry fucking sickening.

    I wouldnt even object to some leader emerging at this point and breaking rules to get us out of death spiral, Im open to almost anything if it can actually be done and proven will work sorry MM doesnt do that, he just gets the ball rolling.

    here this is fun we were just talking about this
    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2119677-chimps-beat-up-murder-and-then-cannibalise-their-former-tyrant/

    [Reply]

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    Scandinavia isn’t really a great example, it wasn’t doing “fine” – I mean, it was providing a great quality of life, but it never solved the problem of either finances or providing people with meaning. I’m most familiar with Finland, so I’ll discuss that. Even before immigration, Helsinki had one of the highest suicide rates, had ground its economic growth into the ground, and was existing in large part due to the existence of NATO which permitted it and sister countries from actually having to invest into defense. Nokia infamously had a culture where all negative feedback was seen as hostile, so eventually they ceased to be a factor. Sweden certainly didn’t need the help of immigration to cuck itself with feminism, either, for another example.

    So my question is that since you’ve managed and built up organizations – what have you noticed about them? My experience is that people are generally lazy(and I’ve mostly worked with Caucasians), period and while they aren’t exactly always prone to gimmedats, and certainly Caucasians are very much inspired by a sense of meaning, the majority isn’t exactly just aching to be productive either in an useful way. What I’ve found is basically this, under stress:

    1) People seek leaders. Especially when under stress, they do not actually want a vote – because that entitles them to blame. In an environment of mostly negative outcomes, they seek leadership partly because they seek a scapegoat.

    2) Conversely, if the outcomes are mostly positive, they do seek a vote because individuals are status-seeking and wish to partake in credit. In an environment of mostly positive outcomes, leadership is much less desired.

    3) If leadership is consistently successful in a hostile environment, they are attributed with great adulation and sometimes with godlike attributes. Since I was part of the leaders and I knew them were very human, this is often with great sacrifice and effort on said “leaders.” Heavy indeed does the crown lay. Its very much a place for burnout.

    4) Any string of failures are usually blamed on the leadership, people are not particularly loyal.

    5) The leadership can be almost completely illusionary, aka a figurehead. The notion is still unifying, much like any other ideology.

    6) Micromanagement is for suckers. Leadership is important and a high-level plan are essential, but implementation should be distributed to local and smaller levels. This also is good op security.

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Brilliant comment.

    Related to 1) & 2): sometimes people seek your advice—or merely just engage you—only to be able to blame you. Such monkey behavior is even seen in the comments here.

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/peter-thiel-on-rene-girards-influence-2014-11?r=US&IR=T

    Posted on January 30th, 2017 at 1:32 am Reply | Quote
  • This Week in Reaction (2017/01/29) - Social Matter Says:

    […] Nick Land sends a postcard from Tokyo. […]

    Posted on February 1st, 2017 at 10:48 am Reply | Quote
  • spandrell Says:

    I used to think Japan was a great place to live in, but a lousy place to visit.

    Now I think the opposite.

    [Reply]

    Daniel Chieh Reply:

    What inspired this thought?

    [Reply]

    spandrell Reply:

    Seeing how rent seeking accelerates while the country economy is collapsing is not pretty.

    As a result of the decline the country has put some resources in promoting tourism, which is vastly more comfortable than it used to be. It’s also a pretty retarded thing to do, but anyway.

    [Reply]

    Candide III Reply:

    > Seeing how rent seeking accelerates while the country economy is collapsing is not pretty.
    That’s the case in all advanced economies except maybe Silicon Valley and to some extent China. Nobody seems to have a clue what to do.
    > As a result of the decline the country has put some resources in promoting tourism, which is vastly more comfortable than it used to be. It’s also a pretty retarded thing to do, but anyway.
    I agree to an extent. It’s a comedown. But tourism is a useful stopgap (until somebody delivers a worthwhile idea), requiring little capital, and also helps with the “dire problem”.

    Posted on February 1st, 2017 at 11:20 pm Reply | Quote

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