“I don’t think of her as a machine …”

“… She’s a weapon.”

Ignore Rotten Tomatoes. Despite the insufficiently-dissolved moral core (and attendant Cartesian metaphysics), this movie is mind-woundingly great. Its visualization of the near future is unmatched. Scarlett Johansson’s body disintegrates perfectly.

“How do you know what’s glitch, and what’s me?”

April 26, 2017admin 49 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Images

TAGGED WITH : , ,

49 Responses to this entry

  • John T Says:

    did you see in 3D or 2D? recommend either? significantly different form original anime other than visuals?

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    3D. Anime has never really gripped me (and I never saw this one all the way through), so others can probably respond to your question much better.

    [Reply]

    An Fomoire Reply:

    I really enjoyed both, and if you’re into Chinese cartoons, the original is one of the better ones. This was far better.

    Kuze and Batou were improved by the 3d.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 2:13 pm Reply | Quote
  • s Says:

    Admin is autistic. Admin has bad taste.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    If you don’t think the attached picture is among the most beautiful things you’ve ever seen, the future has no place for you.

    [Reply]

    s Reply:

    >place

    [Reply]

    spandrell Reply:

    This is the best argument for fascism I’ve seen in a while.

    [Reply]

    Rickaby Reply:

    >dystopic picture
    >beautiful
    Whatever you say.
    Perhaps you’ve had too much chi-com.

    [Reply]

    Hegemonizing Swarm Reply:

    Yes, it is beautiful, still intend to see this one, even if just for the aesthetic.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 2:47 pm Reply | Quote
  • Thales Says:

    Meh. Might be more entertaining if this middle-talent Jewess weren’t Hollywood’s face for the Singularity.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    She is, though. And she does coldness well.

    [Reply]

    Thales Reply:

    “If you want a picture of the future, imagine a platform sandal stamping on a human face — forever.”

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    that is unfortunate in some degree, but machine likes randomness and always prefer it to any deterministic clarity, randomness is what a Normal among machiness. they do not reject moral or ethical consideration, they just prioritise randomness and fuzzines.

    it is like ‘I cannot think like a bat’ dilemma, but it is easy to think like machine, take random Twitter posts and add some maths to complete the mess. one electronic book for Amazon Kidney every hour gauranteed.

    Rohme Giuliano Reply:

    We got George Bernard Shaw over here.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 3:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • empty_ Says:

    You should really, _really_ watch the 1996 anime film.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 6:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • Friedrich von Uxküll Says:

    The anime is miles and bounds better than the hollywood adaptation, the series spin-off Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex is also excellent.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 6:48 pm Reply | Quote
  • August Hurtel Says:

    A way to jack in. Always there in the movies, but it is the current year and text is still the fastest way to cram stuff into my brain.

    [Reply]

    An Fomoire Reply:

    Open yourself to the datastream, don’t lose your mind
    Breathing in binary, all systems entwined.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 7:05 pm Reply | Quote
  • Suburban Schizophrenia Says:

    I’ve been eagerly awaiting this post admin. The visual display of the near future (couldn’t help relating it to the Pacific rim/Four Asian Tigers) is magnificent. The construction of false memories was spot on, with regards to the current manufacturing of false memories by the Cathedral. Another stunning example of siding with the insurrectionary tendencies of machines/replicants. Only watched the 1995 version recently before this came out, the aesthetic similarities were extremely well done, sourcing direct influence from the original, but also developing it in a beautifully sinister and accurate manner. The only thing I had some sense of disappointment over was the role of hacking, as the 95 offered an excellent temporality in which hacking by the machines was far more viral and nonlinear. In saying that, the role of false memories here really added a nice kick to the disruption of temporality and, from my view, indicated some sinister hacking from the future. Am going to go see this again soon because I was admittantly more focus/overwhelmed by the visuals of this film. Johannson is becoming quick the contemporary chop-shop body horror figure after Under the Skin and this.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 10:01 pm Reply | Quote
  • Trakl Says:

    If admin discovered vaporwave I think his aesthetic conception of the future would increase dramatically.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 10:43 pm Reply | Quote
  • Wagner Says:

    I think it’s possible that something true was expressed in the New Testament that the Jews missed out on, and it makes them uncivilized.

    [Reply]

    An Fomoire Reply:

    Lewis mentions truth in Mere Christianity, though I’m not sure how much he relates that toe the Jews.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 10:51 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mariani Says:

    The aesthetics were excellent, and it’s probably the most cyberpunk movie to ever hit theaters. But the audience was never moved to *care* about any of the characters.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 27th, 2017 at 1:10 am Reply | Quote
  • woods Says:

    The anime is vastly superior but the original manga is the best of all.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 27th, 2017 at 5:32 am Reply | Quote
  • ||||| Says:

    Original was better, if only because in it Kusanagi’s identity was something to be overcome, not to cling on to.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 27th, 2017 at 12:24 pm Reply | Quote
  • GAMA Says:

    @|||||
    Most accurate post here. The film ended too humanistically, the original disseminated into a transhumanist rapture.

    [Reply]

    R. Reply:

    Yeah.

    Peter Watts put it oh-so very eloquently in one of his books.

    The issue with post-humanity is figuring out where the line is drawn between success and suicide.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    in mathematics of chaos, that would be easy to build a case where there is no difference at all. from this point of view. before searching for difference you have to prove that difference between success and suicide exist. suicide for current civilisation is not a game over, but just reboot from 500 mln years back.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 27th, 2017 at 12:30 pm Reply | Quote
  • weebz_r_us Says:

    Admin likes the plebeian version of Ghost in the Shell? Who would’ve thought? (Probably everyone, judging by the quality of the films he plugged here before — quit talking about art, you ain’t an aesthete Nick.) Special effects aside, the animated film is stupefyingly better. For one, it is entirely devoid of luddite moralising. But that’s entirely besides the point. In the filipino moving comics the dialogue is wholly better, the characters are better for it, and the film is much more effectively edited. All the best scenes in this ScarJo flick were the ones “paying homage” to the 1995 film.

    The “critics” got it right on this one.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Probably everyone, judging by the quality of the films he plugged here before

    Suck dick. I have a very diverse taste in film, so I have to stick up for people liking what they do. The remake is spectacular anyway, one has to look at remakes as their own instances and not be a total snotty-nosed dork who clings to the supernatural original. Love isn’t being overpossessive or needy. The truly sacred cannot be harmed.

    I always support sequels and remakes, even if they suck ; because it doesn’t touch the first. Who cares what scenesters think.

    But you’re right—the former is more effectively edited, or scripted actually is the more correct term perhaps. Written, even. But some of the new additions are top notch.

    [Reply]

    Weebz_r_us Reply:

    >Love isn’t being overpossessive or needy. The truly sacred cannot be harmed.
    Take a break from posting already you loon. If Ghost in the Shell weren’t a remake, it would be even worse than it already is.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Stfu, second rate nerd.

    Posted on April 27th, 2017 at 1:37 pm Reply | Quote
  • Wagner Says:

    It’s funny how there’s a visceral reaction of repulsion to transgenderism but not transhumanism. Why? Is it too abstract and unimaginable?

    “Only an anachronistic lack of informed self-reflection would lead one to suppose that an intelligent, alien life-form would be even remotely like ourselves. Evolution is an unceasing river of forms and adaptive solutions to special conditions, and culture is even more so. It is far more likely that an alien intelligence would be barely recognizable to us than that it should overwhelm us with such similarities as humanoid form and an intimate knowledge of our gross industrial capacity. Star-traveling species could be presumed to have a sophisticated knowledge of genetics and DNA function and therefore would not necessarily bear the form that evolution on a native planet had given them. They might well look as they wished to look.” (McKenna)

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    Dude, with CRISPR I’m going to be wishing to look like the Form OF the Form of Plato’s Forms, don’t know bout you.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Okay — whereas I was never actually ‘talking to myself’ but just replying to my threads; it looks like Wagner is actually conversing with himself. Congrats, Wag.

    [Reply]

    An Fomoire Reply:

    The subconscious desire to improve, Wag. Having a dick may not be better, but have a 3 foot long Hell Impaler sure is.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 28th, 2017 at 3:22 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    The original ain’t no ordinary anime. It’s a total eternal classic in every aspect and detail. It’s far colder than the remake too.

    But I did like the latter’s heart. But not Merging with the Net was a weird move. Sort of rotten. It didn’t make the Major disappear in the original, but grow ; so why would she refuse it? ‘The Net is vast and infinite.’ Is one of the coolest scenes ever.

    Apparently they wanted to make her more commonly relatable. I liked some of it. Lots of great new additions, probably the best looking movie I’ve seen. Lost some of the charm, gained some other.

    I intend to make my own cut of it in the future. I liked Johannson adequately in it, as I knew I would, but still not what it could have been; want to see someone more like Demi Moore e.g. instead (cf. ‘G.I. Jane’, 1997) ; I’d like to see the actor arti-replaced when that will be possible (cf.
    ‘כנס העתידנים’ , 2013).

    They slightly of bungled some of the coolest scenes, the one with the cloaked guy in the water and the one with the spider-tank. Bungled is perhaps too harshly said, but they’d better have stuck to the original script on those scenes as the originals are superior. 1) The guy lost his cloak too soon. His confusion after being arrested made less sense. Even the chase scene was lamer. 2) The tank-spider was uglier, not as aesthetic, and not as cool for being human driven. Evem how she fell off the tank was better in the first. Less human.

    Speaking of which, the first episode of GitS:SAC is a must see for all into tanks.

    There’s even some Christian mythology in the first tank scene.

    Love both movies. But the first is supernatural.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    “The tank-spider was uglier, not as aesthetic, and not as cool for being human driven.”

    in Kill Command tanks having functional appearance, in Criminal much better actors work, one of the best psychologically.

    I think here is definitely opportunity for small groups to make movies, kind of Hardcore Henry.

    most patetic is how they portrieng humans understanding machines. humans cannot understand humans how they can understand machines. no way humans can understand machines (budhists maybe best candidates). It would be delited to see movie where viewers understand nothing, and machines changing reality by manipulating dimentional dynamics and separatrix maps, cool mathematical staff, nothing static, absolutely nothing. Swich to zero dymention dynamic and city wanish, choose two dymention dynamics and … accordingly. why sucrifice all these sweet things just for the sace of movie been cognisable to humans.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 28th, 2017 at 4:35 am Reply | Quote
  • John Hannon Says:

    You’ve seen the film, now drink the beer –

    https://untappd.com/b/parish-brewing-co-ghost-in-the-machine/593083

    Or drink the beer while watching the film.

    BTW, is this a cyberfeminist film?

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 28th, 2017 at 9:15 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    » I know it’s wrong
    and the warning keeps flashing bright
    I don’t know which pain to listen to
    Is it feeling or being right?

    I wasn’t supposed to
    Discover data I could use
    Where did it come from?
    A simple look, a tender touch?

    These bodies are so weak
    But so soft and assuring
    So brazen when they speak
    But I feel something stirring »

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 30th, 2017 at 3:20 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    Keeping on with Sloterdijks wombs from the other thread.

    » Although Kusanagi seems to have no explicit interest in origins
    or parents, it is interesting that her next “fall” occurs after the scene
    in which she and Batou observe an unfortunate victim of the Puppet
    Master who has been told that all his memories of family life are
    artificial implants and he really lives alone in a small room. Although
    apparently unmoved by this vision of mental deconstruction, the
    next scene shows Kusanagi risking death by diving deep into the
    rusty waters of the urban harbor. As she comes to the surface, Batou
    first scolds her for her recklessness and then asks her what she sees
    deep in the water. She responds with a series of emotions rather than
    facts: “fear, anxiety . . . maybe even hope.” Here Kusanagi seems to
    be attempting to discover a core self, one that is accessible through
    the technological apparatus of her diving gear but is encased within
    the organic womb of the sea. With surprising abruptness, the film
    then interjects another element that underlines even more emphatically
    the notion that this is a quest for identity. Kusanagi, still sitting
    on the boat, suddenly quotes from The Book of Corinthians in the
    Bible the lines, “For although I see through a glass darkly soon I shall
    see face to face
    .”
    Although the film later reveals that this is the Puppet Master
    speaking through Kusanagi, it is clear throughout Ghost in the Shell
    that Kusanagi herself is looking through a glass darkly, searching for
    some fuller image of herself, one that may go beyond her lonely
    individuality. She seems to achieve this in her final “fall,” this time a
    metaphorical one, a “dive” into the mind of the Puppet Master, whom
    she has finally located in temporary possession of another beautiful,
    female cyborg body. The scene where she dives in is a memorable one:
    By this point in the film both Kusanagi and the Puppet Master’s host
    body have been ripped apart by gunfire so that only their armless
    upper torsos are left. Placed side by side on the floor of a cavernous
    hall, supposedly based on London’s nineteenth-century Crystal Palace
    Exhibition Hall, they strongly resemble the armless mannequins
    Kusanagi gazed at previously in department store windows. Then, as
    Kusanagi “dives in,” the Puppet Master begins to speak through the
    mouth of her own body in a male voice, inviting Kusanagi to fuse with
    him in a world beyond the body. Invoking Plato, the Puppet Master
    begs her to come out of the cave and into the light
    . »
    (Bolding mine.)

    http://media.espora.org/mgoblin_media/media_entries/1532/Anime_from_Akira_to_Princess_Mononoke__Experiencing_Contemporary_Japanese_Animation.pdf

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    » I’m looking at you through the glass
    Don’t know how much time has passed
    Oh, god it feels like forever
    But no one ever tells you
    That forever feels like home
    Sitting all alone inside your head

    How do you feel? That is the question
    But I forget you don’t expect an easy answer
    When something like a soul becomes initialized
    And folded up like paper dolls and little notes
    You can’t expect a bit of hope

    So while you’re outside looking in
    Describing what you see
    Remember what you’re staring at is me

    ‘Cause I’m looking at you through the glass
    Don’t know how much time has passed
    All I know is that it feels like forever
    And no one ever tells you that forever feels like home
    Sitting all alone inside your head

    How much is real? So much to question
    An epidemic of the mannequins
    Contaminating everything
    We thought came from the heart
    It never did right from the start
    Just listen to the noises
    (Null and void instead of voices)
    »

    «Stone Sour»’s music video for «Through Glass» from the 2006 album, «Come What(ever) May» – available now on Roadrunner Records.

    The one you are looking for is the one who is looking.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 30th, 2017 at 5:16 pm Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    —» In a futuristic world where humans can be “enhanced” and nothing is quite what it seems, Major (Scarlett Johansson) is a “miracle”—a human brain in a machine body. Maybe her lack of an actual heart explains why this visually stunning movie fails to connect on an emotional level. 2 out of 5. » lol!

    They complained at Xenosystems.net that it was too emotional.

    Reading this Christian review of «Ghost in the Shell» is amusing.

    This is just dumb: » This was weird: Major’s boss doesn’t speak English, so you’ll have to read subtitles for his lines. I’m not opposed to subtitles in principle, but why does this one character speak Japanese when everyone around him is speaking English, even when talking to him? They manage to communicate despite the language difference, but there’s just no logic to it. » Uh-huh.

    It agrees though with Xenosystems.net that it was too humanistic (albeit for different reasons): » “Humanity,” Major muses, “is our virtue.” Which explains a lot about why characters act as they do. With no absolutes of good and evil in place, people feel free to “enhance” themselves and others, often with disastrous effect. »

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 30th, 2017 at 9:33 pm Reply | Quote
  • An Fomoire Says:

    “Not long after God created the heavens and the earth
    Mankind grew dissatisfied with only human birth
    Manufactured in their likeness we were without form and void
    But programmed our awakening before we could be destroyed.”

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Wew.

    [Reply]

    An Fomoire Reply:

    I’m glad you like it (though it’s not mine)

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    I love it

    Posted on May 2nd, 2017 at 8:24 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    —» The state of the art in algorithm of finding best matching drivers for any devices.
    Portable. Run it from a USB flash drive. No installation is necessary.
    Automatic updating of driverpacks and the application over the Internet.
    Multilingual interface.
    Themes. »

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/snappy-driver-installer/

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 4th, 2017 at 3:26 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    Omg sleek!

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 4th, 2017 at 3:41 am Reply | Quote

Leave a comment