Quote note (#174)

Razib Khan on the awesome power of the White Gaze:

The contemporary revisionism, which now is approaching mainstream orthodoxy, is that South Asian religious life before the arrival of the British, and the Western outlook more generally, was characterized by a quietist syncretism where communal boundaries were fluid to the point of identity being a flimsy veil which could be shed or shifted dependent upon context. An alternative history then might be proposed of a united subcontinent, where Hindus and Muslims were coexistent, or, perhaps where a Hindu and Muslim identity did not even exist. The cognitive psychologist Pascal Boyer likes to characterize a theory as “information for free.” You don’t really have to know anything, you can simply deduce from your axioms. Though this model obviously integrates ethnographic and historical realities, it constructs a post-colonial fantasy-land, where South Asian religiosity was without form or edge before the arrival of Europeans and their gaze collapsed the wave function. Before the arrival of Europeans people of color were tolerant of religious diversity, varied sexual orientations, and practiced gender egalitarianism. In other words, India was like the campus of Oberlin college, except without the microaggressions, and more authentic spirituality! [Emphasis in original]

July 24, 2015admin 14 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations

TAGGED WITH : , , , ,

14 Responses to this entry

  • Quote note (#174) | Neoreactive Says:

    […] Quote note (#174) […]

    Posted on July 24th, 2015 at 4:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • Orthodox Says:

    That has to be one of the best examples I’ve ever seen, maybe the best, of unintentional white supremacy.

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 24th, 2015 at 4:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • peter connor Says:

    Very good one, Razib–perhaps the millions massacred by, for example, the moslem rulers of India, sprang back to life because White Man!

    [Reply]

    Artxell Knaphni Reply:

    [peter connor]: “Very good one, Razib–perhaps the millions massacred by, for example, the moslem rulers of India,
    sprang back to life because White Man!”

    {AK}: Only to be massacred & exploited all over again by their resurrectors. Hilarious, isn’t it?

    [Razib Khan]: “Before white Europeans arrived in the Indian subcontinent to roil and upend its social order, to transform
    its culture, there was already a ruling race of self-consciously white people doing just that. They were the Turks, Persians, and a lesser extent Arabs, who introduced Islam to the subcontinent.”

    {AK}: So, the common factor here, is that two groups of “white people” from the West, inspired by Occidental
    monotheisms, both perpetrated “massacres”, both directly & through artificially induced famines, etc..
    One wonders if there are specific ethnogenetic factors responsible for this Occidental trend?

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 24th, 2015 at 5:45 pm Reply | Quote
  • Quote note (#174) | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on July 24th, 2015 at 8:39 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    in India nobody cares much about history. so anyone free to have any fantasies he may wish. in hindi same word used for “tomorrow” and for “yesterday” – “KAL”, depending on context.

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 24th, 2015 at 8:40 pm Reply | Quote
  • SanguineEmpiricist Says:

    My grandfather was killed by muslims in the old country. It’s stunning how quickly false identities and nationalities can be spread across a population base.

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 25th, 2015 at 9:05 am Reply | Quote
  • Artxell Knaphni Says:

    I think it’s safe to say that the reign of Ashoka was the last autonomous unification of almost all of India.
    Not all Muslim-Mughul rule was virulently intolerant, Guru Nanak developed Sikhism without opposition.
    So, yes, Muslim rule of India could vary.
    And, yes, British Imperialism did tactically exploit & aggravate divisions to ease its rule.

    So, yes, in lots of ways, one could support the thesis that “South Asian religiosity was without form or edge before the arrival of Europeans and their gaze collapsed the wave function”. In fact, one could say that, to a certain extent, even now, & not only of India. But it’s not an absolute characterisation.
    There are always going to be periods of relative calm. If there weren’t, there would be nothing produced to exploit. In those periods, hostilities cease, barriers dissolve, people naturally mingle to various extents.
    That doesn’t mean awareness of iniquity or injustice goes away.

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 26th, 2015 at 7:17 am Reply | Quote
  • Hattori Says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aV_850nzv4

    The full effect the white gaze captured on video.

    The poor native has to repeatedly check himself and his surroundings, his reality now altered forever.

    [Reply]

    Artxell Knaphni Reply:

    This was a great comment, & link.
    Thanks for both, Hattori.
    Looks like you’ve inspired NL’s post, here, http://www.xenosystems.net/tribal-epistemology/

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 26th, 2015 at 7:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • maxwell's silver hammer Says:

    You guys are lazy. As Razib says, that’s the /current revisionist/ version. For the rest of the article HE GOES ON TO DEBUNK IT! After lots of history of religious change and non-change, most of which doesn’t mention whites, he ends with:

    > Ultimately the answers of history are more complex than can be dreamt of in your post-colonial philosophy, and the white man is neither angel nor the devil, but a subaltern of historical forces.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Duh! (You really think we don’t get that?)

    [Reply]

    Artxell Knaphni Reply:

    “the white man is neither angel nor the devil, but a subaltern of historical forces.”

    This, of course, can only mean that “the white man” is either very naughty, or a Marxist minion, or both.

    [Reply]

    Posted on July 29th, 2015 at 4:15 am Reply | Quote
  • This Week in Reaction (2015/07/26) | The Reactivity Place Says:

    […] from land this quote from Razib Khan—filed under […]

    Posted on August 1st, 2015 at 1:40 am Reply | Quote

Leave a comment