Quote note (#221)

Malcolm Pollack sums up what he’s getting tired of repeating:

… as far as politics and society are concerned I do believe, as I explained to a commenter recently, that I see a great division widening in America; that our current course is unsustainable; that the traditional American nation, which generations fought and died for, is tottering, under continuous assault from within; that if we look to Europe we see a foreshadowing of what may well happen here; that it is hard for me to see how the deepening fissures dividing our nation can ever be bridged; that the original “operating system” installed at the nation’s founding is increasingly incompatible with the “hardware” it must run on today; that the nation is too vast and too diverse for a centralized government to manage it effectively; that there is a boiling anger in much of America that threatens to tear the nation to pieces; that human biodiversity is both real and vitally important to understanding both history and human societies, and that a great civilizational crisis will soon occur in the West, and in fact is already underway. I believe also that democracy itself has dangerous, perhaps inevitably fatal, liabilities, and that those liabilities are sharply increased by high heterogeneity and universal suffrage. I believe that the West has been committing voluntary suicide through mass Third-World immigration (particularly mass Muslim immigration, which is the fastest path to social and cultural self-extinction that any Western nation can follow.)

February 20, 2016admin 21 Comments »
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21 Responses to this entry

  • grey enlightenment Says:

    that the original “operating system” installed at the nation’s founding is increasingly incompatible with the “hardware” it must run on today;

    I would say it’s more like the old hardware is unable to run the new software.

    [Reply]

    Seth Largo Reply:

    I hate metaphor battles, but I’d say this one matters. And HBD, in my view, requires the original metaphor, with the human material of political economy being the hardware.

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    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 2:40 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    I believe also that democracy itself has dangerous, perhaps inevitably fatal, liabilities, and that those liabilities are sharply increased by high heterogeneity and universal suffrage.

    You mean mob rule fails extra hard when you deliberately include morons, women and children in the electorate? 😉

    [Reply]

    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 2:45 pm Reply | Quote
  • Seth Says:

    The USA is in reality a gigantic free trade zone consisting of culturally distinct peoples and regions. Its ability to operate as such, however, is weakened by the regional power known as the District of Columbia.

    Both progressives and Glenn Beck-style “patriots” share in common a totalitarian unwillingness to neuter that regional power as well as a passionate dedication to the American Union from sea to shining sea, which is different in degree but not in kind from the European Union. They are both equally culpable for whatever disasters befall this Union not allowed to splinter along more organic lines.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    “Gigantic free trade zone.” I like that formulation. It is consistent with the principles of the New Amsterdam nation (though not necessarily with the majority of the other 9).

    Where you say “unwillingness” do you really mean “willingness?”

    [Reply]

    Seth Largo Reply:

    No, but I see your reading of the sentence, and that’s my fault for the syntactic confusion; I should have replaced “that regional power” with “D.C.”

    Progressives and “patriots” both equally dedicated to the preservation of a Union under central governance. Hence both frequently use phrases like “that’s what makes America great,” the assumption always being that America extends from sea to shining sea and thus exists as a unified entity for purposes of legal and moral control.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    This has all got me thinking of Henry Clay Frick, who was a murderous psychopath and an industrial hero of the late 19th century. He was Carnegie’s henchman at Carnegie Steel in Pittsburgh. Responsible for the deaths of hundreds if not thousands of people via the Johnstown Flood (he lowered the dam so carriages could pass to his resort), Homestead Steel strike and countless industrial accidents in the deathtrap factories of Pittsburgh in that era.

    Carnegie, Frick and their ilk imported millions of eastern Europeans to work the mills in Pittsburgh and elsewhere in middle America. At the time people were horrified by all these crass illiterate dumb foreigners invading the country. But the elites did not care. They saw $$$.

    I went to school with their descendants 90 years later. To us, it seemed like we were living in a monoculture. But that is the effect of homogenization. The original impetus was psychopathic drive for wealth and power.

    The drivers of change, then, are those who embody and embrace the concept of America as free trade zone. For good or evil is secondary.

    Erebus Reply:

    >”The USA is in reality a gigantic free trade zone consisting of culturally distinct peoples and regions. Its ability to operate as such, however, is weakened by the regional power known as the District of Columbia.”

    That is not terribly far from how things were understood in the early- to mid-19th century. States and territories valued their independence back then, and even DC politicians typically placed their loyalty to their states, and to their home regions, far ahead of their loyalty to the concept of a Federal Union.
    …But one finds, even back then, countless instances of Federal interference in local affairs. Wasn’t the “Popular Sovereignty” movement hated and decried — by the descendants of the Puritans, no less — for being too democratic and insufficiently progressive?

    Today many “patriots” foolishly conflate the nation with the metastatic Federal government; the progressives are preoccupied, as always, with pushing their social agenda at all costs; and almost everybody is reflexively reverent of the structures, trappings, and myths of modern Democracy. That last part’s the real problem. It’s a failed and fatally flawed system — one which has broken its every promise, and which holds itself together only insofar as it’s not democratic — but one held in deep reverence nonetheless.

    So let’s assume that the Federal Government meets the fate of tyrants and ceases to exist. Splinter states can form along whatever “organic” lines they like, but if they allow their idiots, cowards, deviants, and welfare-recipients to vote, they’ll fare no better than the old Federal Government. (This should be very obvious. Hard to see how it could be otherwise.)
    Democracy is the problem.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Great points. Though if America saw itself as a free trade zone in he 1800s, could it not also be predicted that the free traders would push for the largest possible common market — ie top-down regulation for the country followed by as many naftas and TPPs as possible? It would all be in keeping with the concept of capitalism as a perpetual motion machine that must always, always be fed.

    A guy who saw all this coming was Melville. In Moby Dick (or, The Whale) one of the main themes is the polyglot nature of the crew, all in the service of capital. It is beautifully Protestant and proto-cathedral.

    [Reply]

    Seth Largo Reply:

    And of course the Pequod is owned by Quakers in the novel.

    But in this metaphor, America would be like a Pequod that not everyone volunteered to get on. Also, the insane captain is not allowing anyone to disembark and has destroyed all the lifeboats as he navigates the ship toward destruction.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Oh but it’s just the same in the book. Recall that Ahab waits til the ship is well away from land (i.e. too far to turn back) before he comes on deck and gives his big speech.

    “This is what ye have shipped for, men! to chase that white whale on both sides of land, and over all sides of earth, till he spouts black blood and rolls fin out.”

    We were born into a free trade zone. We “shipped for” it without being consciously aware that we were doing so. But seeing this helps clarify where we are and what our responsibilities and options might be.

    It is not useful to the elites to have you see America as free trade zone, but they certainly treat it as such and always have. So this is one more sort of red-pill insight that proves very helpful to the individual’s ability to survive.

    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 3:33 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    In sanscrit there is saying ‘nimitta viparita’ it refers to realisation that at some point of time course had been changed and ‘how I got here’. kind of atavistic confusion.

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    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 4:56 pm Reply | Quote
  • michael Says:

    Cheer up Malcolm The Saxons beginning to hate; Roger Kimball co editor and publisher of the New Criterion is publicly defending The Derb in two articles, and hes not being coy about what hes defending. The New Criterion and First things laying about the house were probably what woke me up as a young man and though they were at times a stretch for me intellectually yous college boys oughta be right up their alley any ways I happen to know TNC is always on the verge of insolvency so if anyone cares to support civilization and someone who publicly risked his sacred honor to support dark thought you will certainly get your moneys worth subscribing.And it might be a thought of as a signal to another galaxy that others are out there.

    https://pjmedia.com/rogerkimball/2016/02/19/adam-falk-shows-how-far-he-will-go-to-protect-free-speech/

    https://pjmedia.com/rogerkimball/2016/02/20/williams-college-a-modest-proposal-for-adam-falk/

    [Reply]

    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 5:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • Quote note (#221) | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 6:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • Ryan Says:

    Pollack lives in NYC. Hard to take this seriously from someone who lives in NYC, which hasn’t resembled the traditional American nation or been the kind of place resilient to the sort of dangers he describes since perhaps the early 19th century.

    It’d be one thing if he were a survivalist out in Montana or a rural farmer, but he’s in NYC of all places. If you actually believed this, you’d get out of Dodge.

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    michael Reply:

    Have you sold all your dollars and moved yet ?

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    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 7:12 pm Reply | Quote
  • Hummerstein Says:

    US Hegemony dates from Post-Second World War. It is no more complicated than the fact that the Rest-of-the-World’s factories had been bombed to bits. Now that affect is on the wain. Fin.

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    Posted on February 20th, 2016 at 10:37 pm Reply | Quote
  • Irving Says:

    I actually think that America will persist as it is. There is literally zero evidence at this point that the country is breaking up or is on the path towards doing so.

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    smg Reply:

    My feeling is that we’re more polarized than ever and less civil in how we discuss our polarization – particularly the left. They express absolute contempt for ‘crackers’ at every opportunity and rarely even mouth the platitudes about the ‘working man’ any longer. I guess I see it as an unwinding. The ties that used to bind are fraying and influence is shifting (from establishment to anti-establishment). While I don’t see specific, concrete evidence of a complete brake, I do see the potential, and I have no doubt that Cathedral will go into full attack mode against President Trump inflaming the hostility further. A President Clinton or Saunders will be received with absolute horror by many.

    If you’re an establishment type, there are no good outcomes. Add in the one real topic that’s become taboo – the real state of our economy (bankrupt!) – and there’s potentially tremendous cause for unrest.

    I think the change happens more subtly, by the gradual marginalization of the Feds and the most capable states/cities working towards a de facto independence.

    [Reply]

    michael Reply:

    a quadrillion dollars in CDS says otherwise

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    Posted on February 21st, 2016 at 7:13 am Reply | Quote
  • Xoth Says:

    Free trade zone? Yes, to a point minister. (Interstate commerce clause.)

    [Reply]

    Posted on February 22nd, 2016 at 12:47 pm Reply | Quote

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