Quote note (#259)

Western Civilization, rotting from the head:

There’s a new religion exploding on the campuses of American universities and colleges, says Thomas Cooley professor of ethical leadership at New York University, Jonathan Haidt. And if it isn’t stopped, it might just be better to shut them all down in the next 10 or 20 years. […] The religion of fundamental social justice sweeping across college campuses is so alarming, intense, and dripping with such extreme liberal fundamentalism, says Haidt, it has created an existential crisis for American academia while punishing heretics with public shame. […] “There is an extremely intense, fundamental social justice religion that’s taking over, not all students, but a very strong [space] of it, at all our colleges and universities. They are prosecuting blasphemy and this is where we are,” Haidt warned an audience about the religion at a lecture billed “The American University’s New Assault on Free Speech,” organized by the Manhattan Institute in New York City this week. …

[…]

“This, I believe, is an existential crisis for our universities. Our universities simply cannot function if this keeps going, and the reason why is pretty obvious,” Haidt explained. […]
“Human beings are incredibly irrational, biased, imperfect creatures. We are really, really bad at following the truth wherever it leads. The brilliance of some of our classical liberal institutions, especially science at the university, is that it institutionalized disconfirmation. […] “We in science, we don’t really see the truth unbiasedly. We each put out our models, our theories, we try our hardest to prove we are right. And other scientists say ‘no, you didn’t see, this is wrong’ and then we have to defend it. That’s the way it works, institutionalized disconfirmation. It has made us as a species as a culture vastly smarter than we could be if we were just individuals deciding things for ourselves,” he continued. […] “So science, this is very precious, universities are very precious. They only work if you have enormous protections for institutionalized disconfirmation. If I say something, if I publish something, I have to know I’m accountable for it because somebody, if I say something stupid or wrong, someone will challenge me and that is gone,” he said.

(Via.)

June 15, 2016admin 43 Comments »
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43 Responses to this entry

  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Human beings are incredibly irrational, biased, imperfect creatures.

    No, they are not. Human beings are not equal and most of them are nitwits, but some rise above. Put those in charge or your society fails.

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    They are. Jonathan Haidt may have single-handedly broken the Enlightenment. Yes, reactionaries have been saying, since forever, that humans are always guided by the irrational (even as they make religion out of reason), but Haidt gave the claim a scientific backing. Haidt has shown that irrational guides humans, and that rational in them just thinks up the apologia for whatever irrational has settled upon.

    [Reply]

    smg Reply:

    Meh. Even the best and brightest are capable of hubris. Homer and Shakespeare told me so.

    [Reply]

    Agag Reply:

    I suppose I feel that the “free thinking” issue has been something I always cared about. I am an artist. For me, the word “nigger” has always seemed to me to be an obvious example of a sort of religious figure which must be praised and worshipped and feared. To be frank, religion itself is not inherently bad.

    Beyond the issue of a religious doctrine countering reality, there is also the problem of the value of a mind which is able to think outside the box.

    The irony of leftist behavior and culture today is that it is a controlling, destructive, repressive, dogmatic, frightful part of the very fabric of the inhumanity of our institutions today. I HATED college. I always felt like the classrooms felt like prisons, very seriously. Mental and behavioral prisons in which everyone was restricted in their freedom to think outside of boundaries, as well as in their behavior.

    As a creative, I knew innately that this setting – not “patriarchy” or what have you – is the thing holding mankind back from a sort of positive progression in all ways. I knew that this sort of restrictive thinking in and of itself could be identified as the baseline root cause of all the problems in human society. Everything, from real racism and violence, and stupidity, comes back to this thing. It’s a loose idea.

    So for me, I felt like I had to identify the sources of this. And I noticed that this political correctness was one of the absolute central sources of this “thing.” I noticed that there were certain sentences which might come into my mind, which struck me as being far more dangerous or unacceptable to say out loud than others. Naturally these “areas” are the source of the problem in human existence.

    I also postulated that were all these things untangled, naturally mankind is able to properly move toward the best ideas. It is only our fear, and these knots in us, which lead us to bad. Anyway, that became the guiding principle for me to begin diving headfirst into the most offensive and difficult areas of thinking that there are. AKA politically incorrect things, from The Red Pill all the way to race and Africa, all the way to Eugenics, and all the way up to what is probably the absolute Holy Grail which is Holocaust revisionism. I’ve hit all of them.

    For that reason, and my feeling in myself, I have to conclude that the Holocaust in and of itself is a step beyond “mere” political correctness into a territory far more dangerous and maybe even different than the others. It forms the entire theory and strata of the energy inherent to all other dogmas, and therefore is sort of like the core. If we imagine postmodern PC as a giant orb, the Holocaust exists as its burning hot center, reaching out and giving energy to it on every level. It is truly the biggest Holy Cow. For that reason, I also conclude that the best approach to solving the crisis is not to attack race and other PC issues, but to look closer at the festering disease that is the Holocaust, see it as sort of like a sick, rotting heart which needs to be cured. If it can be cured, perhaps all these other areas will be cured along with it.

    Preliminary thoughts which i imagine few will be willing to touch or approach.

    [Reply]

    Agag Reply:

    It’s not a matter of whether or not the Holocaust happened. Such a question is not even worth asking or allowing into one’s mind.

    The question regards the myth-making, the way we respond to the vibe surrounding the issue itself. First off. I would start there. When you blend truth with fiction, a massive and very difficult to untangle unreality and myth is created which can easily be manipulated to all ends in order to fragment and create potentials. Whoever owns the myth does the fragmentation process. Root strata and the ganglion network form the baseline ground. Old conflicts. I guess it would take a sort of surgical procedure to remove the intestinal blockage. Painful, perhaps, but ultimately safe and for a good cause – that is, survival. And once a blockage is removed, one feels a flow, a peace with reality. A happiness and simplicity. I am willing to undergo the procedure. I can see that I feel better like this. The Holocause was a bad one yo. Dayum, dat Holocaust was bad! Sheeeeit.

    [Reply]

    Johan Schmidt Reply:

    Even “The Holocaust was 75% as bad as the Holomodor famine organized by Jewish Bolsheviks” might be enough to break the spell if it gained enough traction.

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    We haven’t succeeded until ‘Lenin’ replaces ‘Hitler’ as the word of abuse (and ‘communist’ replaced ‘nazi’).

    “Wow, just wow! Literally worse than Lenin!”
    “You believe in equality?! What are you, some kind of neo-communist? I wonder what your employer thinks about it?”

    Phileas Frogg Reply:

    The last line is the most important. We PUT them in charge, we don’t let them “run”.

    The only man suited to kingship is the man who realizes how woefully unsuited he is for it. The king must idealize his kingship, while maintaining a personal sense of the sardonic in regard to his own attempts to discharge the functions of his office.

    The day we feel greater than our service is the day we begin to fail in it. We raise up the King.

    Duterte Harry style.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 3:41 pm Reply | Quote
  • No, Conservatives, “Return To God” Is Not The Answer Says:

    […] Haidt hits on a similar illusion, which he gets about […]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 4:28 pm Reply | Quote
  • Dale Rooster Says:

    Shut them down. They’re totally worthless now. Were Socrates, Plato and Aristotle around, they would be ashamed of the so-called academy. It’s sad. My second favorite writer named Fred on the topic:

    http://fredoneverything.org/college-then-and-now-letter-to-a-bright-young-woman/

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 4:45 pm Reply | Quote
  • smg Says:

    Having a child currently in college is a challenge. We have constant conversations about PC culture and the need to disguise real opinions and thoughts because the future ruining consequences of Bad Thought. This is what I image Soviet Russia was like. Hide your real self or expose it only carefully to those you trust least you are scapegoated. I’m careful with my own child in case he uses my words and exposes himself.

    [Reply]

    Puzzle Privateer (@PuzzlePrivateer) Reply:

    My parents did the same thing with me 20+ years ago when we lived in a Blue State.

    It’s a workable strategy but can kinda eat you up inside when you look around you and are surrounded by insanity.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 5:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • John Says:

    Shutting down Harvard will be fully on the table within 5 years.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 5:04 pm Reply | Quote
  • Chris B Says:

    A liberal “science is everything, humans can’t be trusted” advocate claiming the solution is science, while being totaly unaware that this is what made this mess. Liberalism only works if history is actively not studied, so that every now and then “geniuses” can conclude “hey we need more science.” Nice try Haidt. But fail.

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    @Chris B
    Off topic:
    Are you acquainted with Deus Ex, cyberpunk video game from 2000? There, the Illuminati believe that “god was a dream of good government.” A billionaire industrialist and the leader of the Majestic 12 Robert Page wishes to merge with the AI Helios, and through control of the Aquinas Protocol (a thing somewhat reminiscent of Urbit) and nano-assemblers called Universal Constructors become all-seeing, all-knowing, and all-powerful, finally providing the planet with good government. Interesting don’t you think (the other interesting thing about the game is that it accidentally predicted 9/11) that your political theory was anticipated in a video game villain?

    [Reply]

    Aeroguy Reply:

    Yo, Helios, I’m really happy for you, I’ma let you finish, but the Omar had one of the best videos of all time! One of the best videos of all time!

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    Invisible War is absolutely haram! We shall speak of it no more. No more!

    Vitis Reply:

    IW’s plot was good, the mechanics & level design ruined it. NG Resonance blew my young mind.

    Ahote Reply:

    @Vitis

    Good plot?! IW always seemed like insufferable progressive propaganda to me. Actual quotes from the game:

    “Is it freedom when one child is born in poverty, a chance combination of organic materials, while wealthy child is shaped every day of his life, enhanced genetically, trained, educated, often augmented nano-technologically?”

    “Make all beings truly equal in both body and mind.”

    Muh benevolent AI will connect with everyone’s mind through nanotech (that makes everyone equal, and also enables global Socialism because muh nanotechnological post-scarcity) and establish a global direct (direct in the literal way) democracy. Ugh…

    Vitis Reply:

    That’s why I chose the Omar.

    Chris B Reply:

    @ahote this tiresome.

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    And you doing the Yellow Scare ALL the time isn’t?

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    @ahote simply put, neoreaction should have been a coherent anti-republicanism school of political thought exploring the ramifactions of divided governmental structures from a radical position. Instead it has been colonised by leftists, liberals, whigs, and the whole gamut of republicans (as in advocates of divided governance.) This includes you. This happened because no one was at the helm with a clear conception, so it bent to this in a heart beat, because everything in a republican structure does so. Every single point of possible choice in direction is incentivized to popularity without a solid core of intellectually disciplined gatekeepers. So at every point, this sad, tired old “we should all be free” crap is followed, and at every point concessions are made to blatent entryists. Its as clear as day when I get aggressive push back and ridicule over obviously Moldbug positions from “neoreactionaries.” Hestia should wrap it all up. They failed badly.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    The stubborn refusal to buy into your neat “let’s throw the baby out with the bathwater (hell, it’s the baby we really want to get rid of)” position has to be deeply frustrating. Why on earth would anyone want liberty when they could be demanding a Fnargl-simulation?

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    @Chris B
    You got me wrong. In no way am I saying that owner(s) of a country shouldn’t have total control of the country. I’m just saying that such a thing is an anarcho-capitalist fantasy — there’s nothing to guarantee security, and therefore the best you can hope for is stable equilibria of powers. Learn from history. Officially Russian tsar was a despot (in non-pejorative sense, i.e. ruled with unfettered executive power, just the way you want), but in reality he was a very weak figure, because ultimately, tsar has no supernatural powers, he couldn’t even control his ministers, and let alone the bureaucracy across the empire’s provinces i.e. feudalism fared better in reality exactly because much maligned imperium-in-imperio subsidiarity. You noticed that Hong Kong and Singapore were presided over by executives, but you failed to notice that they’re microstates, which matters because despotism doesn’t scale well.

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    @Ahote “learn from history” none of that follows at all. You are just parroting Whig propaganda with the usual survivor bias. Which is fine, that’s what Whigs do. It is called “Whig history.” But there you go, whig history cited as authorative on a Neoreaction site. Surprise…

    [Reply]

    Ahote Reply:

    Yeah, those Whigs man, they really liked Feudalism.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    That’s feudalism. Which edgy Internet movement do I go to if I think Genghis Khan pretty much had it right?

    Ahoet Reply:

    @Grotesque Body

    Jack Donovan’s movement.

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 5:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • Bettega Says:

    Maybe if there was more documentaries about the Cultural Revolution on Netflix people would be more mentally equipped to deal with this kind of religious political fanaticism, which is not really new.

    [Reply]

    John Reply:

    It’s striking that there is literally nothing. I haven’t seen or heard of a single documentary about Chinese communism in my entire life.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 5:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • bob sykes Says:

    Right now, James Cook University in Australia is punishing one faculty member for publishing a critique of a paper written by other faculty at the school. The school has threatened to fire him despite his tenure if he does it again.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 5:57 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    in Russia when somebody say : – he is very good person
    people often reply : – yeah, especially when he sleeping with his tooths toward the wall.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 6:45 pm Reply | Quote
  • John Morris Says:

    The answer is pretty simple and a core idea of NRx. Formalize it. It acts like a religion, it has all of the attributes of a religion, declare it one. Get a Red State’s Legislature to declare it a religion and subject to everything that entails. No government funding, no State Uni can teach it, no student can be punished for failing to profess the faith. Pretty safe bet that after a year or two of protests and screeching that State’s colleges and universities would be models of improvement for other States to emulate.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Yes, that is the idea — whether explicitly formulated as such, or not. Spread recognition of progressive universalism as a religion, so that its claims and actions will be interpreted accordingly.

    [Reply]

    Anon Reply:

    “… declare it one.”

    Already done: http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195301052.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780195301052-e-3

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 15th, 2016 at 9:42 pm Reply | Quote
  • Grotesque Body Says:

    Why is the Turing Test taken as the be-all end-all definition of what a mind is by NRx autists? Because Turing is Turing and Turing is very authoritative and famous and we all have to [gratuitous porn moment] and accept his prescriptions and that’s that.

    [Reply]

    frank Reply:

    How is this relevant?

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    Autists can’t handle tangents.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    [stream of gratuitous telling truth to power, not sanctioned by XS censorship bureau]

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 16th, 2016 at 2:57 am Reply | Quote
  • Outliers (#10) Says:

    […] Unverifiable ideology. Rainbowlocaust (and fallout). Outrage! Default’s shadow. The question. Nihilism. Xenophobia. Race-loyalty. Democracy death vigil. Only 10%? Miscegenationism. End (of) Democracy. Brainstorm. Prosecution not persecution. […]

    Posted on June 19th, 2016 at 5:03 am Reply | Quote
  • jack arcalon Says:

    Universities are social conformity factories, a bit like Sunday School, the Young Pioneers or the madrassa that Obama attended.

    [Reply]

    Posted on June 19th, 2016 at 2:20 pm Reply | Quote
  • This Week in Reaction (2016/06/19) - Social Matter Says:

    […] Nick Land digs up an old gem from Foseti Is Libertarian Racist? Of course it is, but not everybody knew that in 2012. Also this: when discrediting tinfoil hatters confirms their most feverish suspicions. Speaking of feverish: Jonathan Haidt’s liberal sense of fairness. […]

    Posted on June 22nd, 2016 at 8:58 am Reply | Quote

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