Quote note (#352)

Cowen the edgelord:

Let’s say you’ve read and loved Julian Simon, who stressed mankind’s indefatigable power of creation and innovation. I certainly have. Simon stressed that the cost of producing real resources likely would fall, thereby spreading wealth across mankind. The bad news is that probably should make you a Malthusian. …

The compact argument is brilliant, brutal, contrarian, and solidly-traditional in a way that’s not easy to over-appreciate.

May 11, 2017admin 55 Comments »
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55 Responses to this entry

  • Xoth Says:

    Here’s a fun article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/11/accelerationism-how-a-fringe-philosophy-predicted-the-future-we-live-in

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    » One session involved Nick Land “lying on the ground, croaking into a mic”, recalls Robin Mackay, while Mackay played jungle records in the background. “Some people were really appalled by it. They wanted a standard talk. One person in the audience stood up, and said, ‘Some of us are still Marxists, you know.’ And walked out. »

    ROFL

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    ‘Whether one wants to reach a goal or to avoid all goals (as, e.g., the philosopher does who smells a boundary, a nook, a prison, a stupidity in every goal)?’ number 6 of eight Nietzsche principal questions.

    [Reply]

    Hegemonizing Swarm Reply:

    Trolling Marxists before it was cool.

    [Reply]

    John Hannon Reply:

    “Trolling Marxists before it was cool.”

    On that occasion it was more a case of Charlie trolling supposedly transgressive academia (so transgressive they called for security). And Charlie was no Marxist, or even a socialist as such – just a crazed alcoholic guitarist with an eye ever open for the craic.

    John Hannon Reply:

    Fun indeed –

    “One session involved Nick Land ‘lying on the ground, croaking into a mic,’ recalls Robin Mackay, while Mackay played jungle records in the background. ‘Some people were really appalled by it. They wanted a standard talk. One person stood up, and said, ‘Some of us are still Marxists, you know,’ and walked out.'”

    Mackay is slightly misremembering here. Rather than just walking out, the person was physically slung out by the campus security, while protesting “I’m a socialist, goddamn it!” (like he expected the security staff to say, “Oh sorry sir, we didn’t realize. Carry on.”) – the security having been called in the first place after he’d got hold of the microphone before Nick’s performance started in order to recite some beat poetry.
    Yes, it was another vodka-fueled intervention by my late friend, the blues guitarist and unsolicited performance artist, Charlie “Bad Boy” Mitton.
    Permanently drunk and barred from nearly every pub in Birmingham, life was just one big stage to Charlie. Gatecrashing big events, usually via the kitchen, and buttonholing famous people like they were old mates was his speciality, in particular at the Cannes Film Festival. Best of all was when he once managed to get backstage at a Bob Dylan gig and was just about to join him on stage when security spotted him (he was convinced “Bob would have been cool about it.”)
    Utter nutter.
    Iain Sinclair later immortalized him and myself as the “Ketamine Kreeps” in his novel “Landor’s Tower.”

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Well, I’ll be darned; as it were.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 11th, 2017 at 4:24 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    How can one not be a Malthusian? Finite space is finite space; whether we think it is food or other resources that ultimately cause conflict, that conflict is inevitable.

    [Reply]

    Peter A. Taylor Reply:

    I remember reading an Isaac Asimov article as a child where he estimated the number of elementary physics particles (protons, neutrons, and electrons) in the known universe, and calculated the number of years it would take at some modest exponential growth rate for the human population to reach the same number. So yeah, however much commodity prices fluctuate in the short term, it’s hard to deny that sooner or later, Malthus is going to win the argument. *Something* will limit population growth.

    [Reply]

    John Hannon Reply:

    Malthus would have loved this –

    http://www.peterrussell.com/Odds/WorldClock.php

    and the “food clock.”

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Asianisation of western living quarters is happening. That means more poeple in smaller quarters. Boxes.

    As seen in Neuromancer and Snow Crash. Already many people occupy space mostly virtually, i.e. cyber space.

    Foodgrow has become available in a controlled and miniaturised manner as well. With digital clocks timing, requiring less manpower but at consumer price.

    Incidentally, » It’s estimated that around 10,000 people live in industrial buildings – although the true number is not known due to the very fact it is not legal. Hong Kong consistently ranks as one of the most expensive places to rent or buy in the world. Already around 200,000 have been forced to rent in what are known as subdivided flats. But now attention has turned to those in even more dire conditions in industrial blocks. From poor government planning, the loss of industry to mainland China and exploitative landlords, we uncover why people are choosing to live in secrecy in neglected buildings. »
    «BBC World Service – The Documentary, Hong Kong’s Secret Dwellings»

    As an interviewee notes, this is a case co-essential with other modern metropolitan areas. I am already myself providing housing for the needy (foreigners) in Iceland.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Apparently the concept ‘foodgrow’ was already invented and appropriated :

    —» Love the idea of having home grown organic food but don’t know where to start? At FoodGrows we source and test the best products available, enabling you to grow food regardless of your space, lifestyle or experience. Small, shade-filled balcony? Grow a bounty of kale. No balcony at all? Create a wall of living microgreens. Large, sun-soaked yard? A custom designed aquaponics system could feed your whole family. We have researched the newest and best innovations in aquaponics, aeroponics and hydroponics, we have tested the latest soils, fertilizers and amendments; and we provide you with the results from our experts. » » In less than 10 questions, let’s find some growing kits to get you started. »

    [Reply]

    Hegemonizing Swarm Reply:

    > Asianisation of western living quarters is happening. That means more poeple in smaller quarters. Boxes.

    > As seen in Neuromancer and Snow Crash. Already many people occupy space mostly virtually, i.e. cyber space.

    This reminds me of the satirical work “The Futurological Congress” by Stanislaw Lem (1971). It deals with extreme overpopulation, made only livable by high dosage of specifically targeted brain medication (‘mascons’) creating essentially a VR environment (VR wasn’t a thing at the time). The lies go all the way from the top level of a “automated luxury utopia” for everyone to boxes, to brain farms, and even that turns out to be fake. In the end everyone just dies, hungry, in the cold, having run out of resources.

    I expect brain farms to be the data center AND living quarters of the next century. At some point that might put a stop to Malthus – Malthus saw population growth as inevitable, but if mammalian reproductive instincts are no longer an issue but replaced by artificial wombs, cloning, synthetic growth then the population numbers could, at least in theory, be better managed according what a community finds acceptable.

    > I remember reading an Isaac Asimov article as a child where he estimated the number of elementary physics particles (protons, neutrons, and electrons) in the known universe

    There’s plenty of room both at the top and at the bottom. Theoretically the whole universe could be spammed with machinery operating at the Planck scale. Then if that is everything, the absolute limit has been reached. It boils down to the question of whether the whole uni(or multi)verse is limited.

    (To get there in the first place, not only population has to grow, but also intelligence, there have to be enough resources invested in science, and the civilization cannot be too risk-averse. Otherwise Lem’s scenario is more likely)

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    In the end everyone just dies, hungry, in the cold, having run out of resources.

    That’s ridiculous.

    Posted on May 11th, 2017 at 9:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    Because of the late trendy trend in no in-sentence capitalization things like this appear:

    —» While other countries in the region have people in “slavelike conditions”, the situation in Mauritania is “unusually severe”, according to African history professor Bruce Hall. »

    I’m guessing because of the name that he meant African History professor—i.e. someone who’s a professor in African History as a subject—not an African professor.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 12th, 2017 at 12:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    this kind of take on the world usually originated in realisation of personal sicknes and morbidity. it can be too painful experience, so lets move it to global, or as Azimov smartly proposed galactical level. Another possible aproach is to see the world as transition of phases between chaos and relative stability. that can be more useful as we can observe the signs of Hell gate getting closer. Gates of chaos is quite precisely formulated in physic of chaos.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 12th, 2017 at 4:54 pm Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    I didn’t know Fisher took his life. That is so sad. Makes me feel like I wish I would have done something, altho I only learned of him after his death.

    —» Towards the end of his life, Fisher was increasingly preoccupied by the idea that Britain was not heading towards some great leap forward, but stasis. For all the freneticism of modern life, in some ways even the most developed countries still live in the opposite of accelerated times: the same parties seemingly perpetually in power; the same sluggish capitalism, still struggling for momentum a decade after the financial crisis; the same yearnings for the good old days, expressed by elderly Brexit voters and nostalgic leftists alike. »

    I’ve had depression myself, and attempted suicide. But I got over it and don’t think I will ever get it back. There’s nothing bad about death imo, altho I’m sure losing a child or someone prematurely is horrible. My dad died out of cancer which was actually an improvement for everybody, I think, including himself. He was depressed and quite unlike me.

    I don’t think an intellectual’s like Fisher’s death is positive though. It’s the eclectic affinities (interests) which make me feel what I mentioned. Recognition of shared intellectual pathways or levels. My dad had started to use the Internet in the past few years though, so maybe he had more developmental hope than I sometimes think he had. Hah.

    However, about “bleak” Modernity or “capitalism” as people tend to call everything nowadays somehow (along with “Neoliberalism”) — the devil lies in the details. Or shall we say, God speaks through details. Deus Mechanicus does.

    It’s not the “same sluggish capitalism”. Modern life can be less frenetic than 20th-century life. I hardly can believe how coz-e my life has become. I hardly need to leave the bed or the hot-tub. I get girls online. I get food online. I get music online.

    I get work online. I get war online.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    I think of humans as machines. for machine to work properly you have give it, what required, oil, petrol, electricity. in same way if main source of enegry for human cells is ATP, then you need to provide some creatine (which is ATP precursor) to have energy. that is perfectly natural and scientific and not a bit valetudinary. Unfortunately Mark Fisher rejected use of suplements or medicines.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    So-called supplements are possibly what got me out of the abyss.

    They’re not necessarily “supplements” but can be essentials.

    Someone interested in better human living should be interested in packing essential nutrients into the smallest digestible containers. Maximum nutrition in minimal form. It can replace 3 square meals.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    that is what I eat for last 10 years and still alive (joke). aminoacids no need digestion it goes direct into cells. twinlabs Amino FUEL best one I ever tried.

    Hegemonizing Swarm Reply:

    > I don’t think an intellectual’s like Fisher’s death is positive though. It’s the eclectic affinities (interests) which make me feel what I mentioned.

    I’m in the same boat. Only learned about Fisher after he took his life. And I feel the same sadness about it.

    > However, about “bleak” Modernity or “capitalism” as people tend to call everything nowadays somehow (along with “Neoliberalism”) — the devil lies in the details. Or shall we say, God speaks through details. Deus Mechanicus does.
    > It’s not the “same sluggish capitalism”. Modern life can be less frenetic than 20th-century life. I hardly can believe how coz-e my life has become. I hardly need to leave the bed or the hot-tub. I get girls online. I get food online. I get music online.
    > I get work online. I get war online.

    I tend to agree. When in my 20’s, heavily depressed, I never assumed my life would be as post-cyberpunk as it is today. I always assumed I was a misfit, but reality is that I thrive in the current circumstances. Not so much being rich but having everything I want or need available easily, carefully curating my filter bubble, so many interesting things to read or research. I can work from home without having to confront annoying or unpleasant people, whereas I can freely associate with people with similar interests. I don’t feel sorrow for “the old world”.

    The only thing that occasionally gets to me is bouts of misplaced guilt, and political fear-mongering. Suicide is always an option, the ultimate exit, but I’ve grown to prefer milder forms of escapism.

    > Unfortunately Mark Fisher rejected use of suplements or medicines.

    Some would prefer to die before (perceiving to be) losing agency. Maybe irrational – I did take anti-depressants myself and it helped, but I respect the choice.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    I never assumed my life would be as post-cyberpunk as it is today.

    We born in the 70s, 80s, and 90s grew up on Cyberpunk ‘without knowing it.’ Never heard of the concept not that it registered in my mind until mid-20s (2008 maybe). But I was playing in It already as a wee kid, 1990-1995. TMNT®, Double Dragon, what have you.

    having everything I want or need available easily, carefully curating my filter bubble, so many interesting things to read or research. I can work from home without having to confront annoying or unpleasant people, whereas I can freely associate with people with similar interests. I don’t feel sorrow for “the old world”.

    Nails it.

    [Reply]

    Inevitably Right Reply:

    i don’t feel sorrow for “the old world”.

    That’s the thing that makes us so very very different from the Nazis and other “Socialists”— they’re frickin’ sorrowful crying-their-heart-out romanticists.

    Care means etymologically ‘sorrow.’

    Cremate care.

    Posted on May 12th, 2017 at 6:26 pm Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    God dies to be reborn

    theguardian.com/news/audio/2017/apr/28/god-in-the-machine-my-strange-journey-into-transhumanism-podcast

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Perturbator – “Sentient” [Music Video]

    Cultivize > cultivate

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    So it is done
    Our ritual is complete
    We leave the infernal regions
    Our ancient cult is no longer hidden
    We exit the ritual chamber
    PREPAIRED FOR WAR!!!

    (“Inquisition” album: “Into The Infernal Regions Of The Ancient Cult” (1998)

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 12th, 2017 at 7:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • Daniel Chieh Says:

    What are the best drugs, admin?

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    it is same as a best gun

    [Reply]

    Alrenous Reply:

    Used correctly, psychedelics can do fun things like permanently cure depression or erase criminal tendencies.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    cure depression or erase criminal tendencies.

    Psychedelics are the corrective treatment of the future.

    Incidentally, I saw yesterday that Gary Grant used therapeutic LSD a 100 times.

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/12/cary-grant-how-100-acid-trips-in-tinseltown-changed-my-life-lsd-documentary

    [Reply]

    John Hannon Reply:

    “Psychedelics are the corrective treatment of the future.”

    Uniquely useful as brain/consciousness research tools too. Still so much to explore there. For example –

    “There are strong indications that we seriously under-develop our neocortex and hardly touch its potential, though we use all of it by default, simply because the brain functions as an integrated unit.
    John Lorber, a British neuro-scientist, found during a preliminary survey, over 150 people with virtually no neocortex at all. They had all suffered hydrocephalic disease (water on the brain) since birth. Brain scans showed normal basal and limbic structures, but only 5% or so of the normal amount of neocortex. For all intents and purposes, their heads were full of water (or, more precisely, CSF). Disturbingly enough, these “brainless people” had I.Q.’s ranging up to 120, many held advanced educational degrees and important professional positions and seem perfectly normal, bolstering the claim that we modern humans get along quite well using only a fraction of our new brain’s capacity. The hydrocephalics may function as well as we do, since we are using no more new brain than they are, though they are using and developing all of theirs, while we develop and use only a minimum of ours.

    Our natural embeddedment is in the limbic-R-system alliance which gives rise to our personality with its prejudices, fears, desires, ambitions, every facet of self as recognized by both ourself and others. This identity is a critical part of our childhood and young adulthood. When such a temporary identity becomes permanent, however, it is our enemy, and drags us down to death and despair, and causes social grief and disaster. This is difficult to grasp since we are our identity of the moment. The ego-self is all we know; it constitutes every fiber of our being, and we can’t recognize it for we have no other position from which to view it. A threat to this aesthetic-emotional bundle of desire is like a knife at the throat. Our greatest fear is that our ideation, our notions of who and what we are, might fall into chaos. So we can as ego-selves neither self-analyze nor self-correct. Only an ‘outside’ force, something other than our ego-self, can bail us out of our impasse, but this ‘outside’ force is actually ‘inside’ us. It is ‘outside’ only in the sense of being absolutely other than our passionate and desperate ego-self clinging to what it knows.
    Recall that neural structures form in utero for precise needs, but are eliminated before birth so they don’t impede the next stage. An ego-self forms throughout the first 15 years to serve critically important ends, but should be superseded by a higher intelligence in later adulthood, just as the terrible two’s will is a critically needed device, to be eventually replaced. Daily we read of atrocities committed by adults still caught in the 2-year old’s emotional web.
    The same applies to our passionate, fearful ego-self. Post-operations must incorporate this mammalian based awareness, with its thorough grounding in the physical body, into service of the late forming structures of the neocortex, an incorporation that will result in an integrated self system bearing almost no relation to the earlier one. … This late stage, merger of the lower self with the higher self may be our classical notion of union with God, the rarely achieved aims of most spiritual systems.”

    – Joseph Chiltern Pearce, Evolution’s End.

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Yeah, I think guys like Moldbug and ourselves—mouthbreathers—use more of the neocortex than the slopeheaded.

    http://www.google.is/search?q=mouthbreather&source=lnms&tbm=isch

    This has apparently become a meme in relation to the TV show «Stranger Things», which features a very powerful psyker as the mouthbreather.

    Inevitably Right Reply:

    Excellent infomateria, Mr. J. Hannon.

    I do have things to say on this.

    Posted on May 13th, 2017 at 2:31 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    I didn’t expect I’d say this but I wish to fund the Guardian, a mainstream media, one would say — because they produce such darn good (comparably) material

    https://soundcloud.com/theguardianlongread

    Where oil rigs go to die. By Tom Lamont
    How rich hippies and developers went to war over Instagram’s favourite beach
    Confessions of a reluctant gentrifier. By Eula Biss
    Is it too late to save Hong Kong from Beijing’s authoritarian grasp? By Howard W French
    Patagonia and The North Face: saving the world – one puffer jacket at a time. By Marisa Meltzer
    Killer, kleptocrat, genius, spy: the many myths of Vladimir Putin. By Keith Gessen
    Into the woods: how one man survived alone in the wilderness for 27 years. By Michael Finkel

    This is just from the top of their list.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 13th, 2017 at 9:47 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    Speaking of non-sluggish things: anyone here into scripting (programming)? I specifically have something in mind like AutoHotKey ; a most brilliant app.

    You can program your PC to do literally anything.

    Such as insert special characters on the press of a button. «Put Your Keyboard’s Unused Keys to Use (by Turning Them into Awesome Shortcuts)».

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    I written few primitive viruses on assembler in 90s. cool experience talk directly to processor and kill it, like something alive. take a look at code of those assembler viruses, such briliance and geniality will be never seen in programing again. at lot of distruction power loaded into few lines of code. powerfull server at this time run on 4mb of RAM.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    I started my computing, nongamewise on 486 and also green-screen computers. Both from my grand-dad. I was like 9 years old. Windows 3.0 is one of the smoothest OSes I’ve tried. Gamewise it was Nintendo® (ES), at age 5.

    So it literally killed the CPU? Was that through overheating?

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    not physically, that was early buffer overflow attacks, virus write itself into boot loading sector on HD, so after each restart computer get frozen or HD formated. at these days it was deadly attack, no any devence against it was possible and plenty of vulnarabilities.

    SVErshov Reply:

    tablets keyboards nowadays really cool, it change to many layouts while you type and can remember everything you type. can provide valuable suggestions. if it will go in that direction for few years more, these keyboards will type everything, all you’ll have to do just think.

    where those guys gone? sorry for asking that.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    I hope after simetimes humans will stop thinkig too, machine will think and type, and we all become readers, there would no point in writing, we can just read absolutely fantastic staff written by machines.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Yes, thinking is already being outsorced. Land sort of mentioned paracirca such in http://www.xenosystems.net/de-localized/

    —» For decades now, everyone who has thought about the matter at all has known that we were going to arrive here — which is to say nowhere in particular — and we almost have. It struck me forcibly in Cambodia, where connectivity was difficult enough to impinge on consciousness, that being linked near-continuously to nowhere (in particular) had become a fundamental expectation of my psychological existence. Twitter, ‘where’ I am still a novice, had drastically reinforced the blogger mentality that ejects the mind from place. Thoughts now latch onto online articulation as their natural zone of consolidation, entangled in social networks exempted from geography. A neural-implant twitter chip, uplinked through satellite to the Internet, seemed to be an inevitable consummation of current micro-media trends. » (Feb 5, 2014).

    Not only thinking words, but images. I can see the utility of DynamAI projecting to you different versions of your day as you wake up, maybe a few versions which you can then pick one or two from and the AI will help you go that path in your day. One is writing a program, the other is going to the store.

    It’s not like these things are difficult already, but the video the AI will show you is including of weather, so you already can see how that plan will go before you step out because the traffic is included as well. The amount of traffic projected that time of day. It also adds people you know into the vision, if they are liable to be nearby. It’s like a projection of things likely to happen. Including everything like projected rate of terrorism in the area based on 100 years of data.

    There’s coming a time when we’ll use all these Science reports in our daily lives.

    SVErshov Reply:

    I had a conversation recently with amazon customers support guy, he asked me same stupid question 3 times, that is how I know he is human.

    Posted on May 13th, 2017 at 10:30 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    @John Hannon

    A threat to this aesthetic-emotional bundle of desire is like a knife at the throat.

    Darn, just tell me about dealing with someone’s libidinal stupidity.

    [Reply]

    John Hannon Reply:

    Not quite sure I catch your drift there, Mr E.
    Anyway, here’s a bit more cosmic debris from “Evolution’s End” –

    “Truth is function, not a thing, idea, event, or semantic slogan. Truth is how creation works. Understand function and you are home-free. The opposite of truth is delusion, the non-functional. My fearful self-sense, a ‘raging bundle of desire in a dying animal’ as W.B. Yeats calls it, is the only delusion there is. All else is God.”

    It’s an odd, idiosyncratic book, raging against modern American obstetrics, child-rearing and state education within the context of a grand cosmological mash-up of Bohm’s Implicate Order theory and Kashmir Shaivism, while along the way making such observations as –

    “A high percentage of black children are uneducable, a fact strenuously denied and covered with massive deceptive studies supported by huge investments, lest anyone admit to the facts.”

    There’s also a fascinating chapter describing the utterly astounding and inexplicable abilities of idiot savants, and accounts of fire-walking rituals and psychic metal-bending sessions which the author has participated in.
    Like I said, odd and idiosyncratic – even woo-ish in parts. But recommended.
    One more quote –

    “Unity does not deny diversity nor does diversity mean loss of unity. Complementarity between unity and diversity is how experience unfolds.
    Our intuition of an underlying wholeness shouldn’t imply melting into a homogenous mass. Our need as individuals is for appropriate relationship, a challenge of far greater magnitude and difficulty than dissolving into a homogenized unity.
    Existence is from the latin existere, meaning ‘to be set apart.’ Without separation there can be no diversity, no creation, no longing and subsequent union.
    As living creatures, we are all Maya. As witnessing selves we are all that witness. We have identified of necessity with Maya since conception. Our maturation lies not in denying Maya but in identifying with the witness in order to protect Maya as our own being. Even this is no final point, however; evolution’s end pulls us beyond separation, beyond all name and form, as Meister Eckhart put it, beyond all structures and knowledge, and all emotions therein. Even the sublime union between the separated self and its source is but another point of departure into the unknown. My meditation teacher summed it up by saying: ‘We don’t go back to unity, we move beyond diversity.'”

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    “Truth is function, not a thing, idea, event, or semantic slogan”

    Absolutely. Truth is operation. Opera. Process.

    [Reply]

    Bruce Arney Reply:

    “A high percentage of black children are uneducable, a fact strenuously denied and covered with massive deceptive studies supported by huge investments, lest anyone admit to the facts.”

    The very same could be said of us. Ignorance, the willful kind, is not limited to the darker races.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Difference lies in the details.

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    It’s hard to invent a concept these days… Evidently Lyotard had already used this phrase.

    [Reply]

    Bruce Arney Reply:

    Thinking outside the box is politically incorrect these days. That which describes the self-destruction is forbidden.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    We shall then bid it anew.

    Bruce Arney Reply:

    The concept of liberal self-destruction is a valid construct. The powers that be don’t encourage self-critical thought because it just might lead to understanding. If you cannot frame the problem, how in the world are you to find the solution. The solution comes from seeing the problem through eyes which have not been blinded by political correctness. These people put baby parts in the soup, therefore they are beyond the pale and in a different place altogether.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    The concept of liberal self-destruction is a valid construct.

    Self-destruction ad libitum, eh?

    Posted on May 14th, 2017 at 4:33 pm Reply | Quote
  • Outliers (#52) « Amerika Says:

    […] The Bad News Is That Good News Will Make You A Malthusian (Nick Land, Outside In) […]

    Posted on May 15th, 2017 at 3:34 pm Reply | Quote
  • Inevitably Right Says:

    ▬» This was a reply not merely to you but to the world and beyond.

    I’m an extropian myself, so interesting stuff. I think it’s exactly better health management and thus better health that our technological progress can bring us. Yesterday I happened to pick up a magazine in the gas station, waiting for them to cook my burger, reading about an Icelandic biomedical-device startup that got very rich very fast.

    They do sleep research. I have sleep apnea myself, and have slept with a mask which always reminded me of Darth Vader. The mask was connected to a sleek looking box (machine) which’s purpose was to increase blood oxygenation. That means more oxygen for me, as my body is mal-functioned, i.e. not at full health or operability in its system of sleep-respiration (which does influence all other systems). No body is at absolute functionality, nor do we know their limits. RDA for example is relatively bunk. Gross. Massed. Proletarian.

    I don’t get normal levels of oxygen from my body’s breathing organs, but a machine can get me to normal levels or better the average even. Of course, as each body is custom there will be different optimums in detail. A retardation can become an improvement. A fix an enhancement. Enhanced health, enhanced vitality, enhanced operativity. Performance.

    It hasn’t gotten that far though, because the State-run service at the State-run hospital is not into listening to customers—apparently. I mean, “patients”. The staff ignored what I said about this particular CPAP machine not delivering airborne moisture—not enough anyway, altho I had that expansion pack connected. The ol’ nursie literally brushed this vital technicality off. She has credentials after all. (But didn’t seem to know anything about electromechanical systems. Less than a teenage nerd, she seemed to know.) They were loaded with prejudice as well, “most people who have sleep apnea are fat.” I knew those statistics, but what is a healthcare system if it ignores deviations? (A: Ideological. Massified. Public. Less custom-er precise.) I’d already been diagnosed according to their diagnostic systems (another type of electronic computer-read device) anyway, and I have a family history of the disease. This isn’t a sweaty little human thing, it’s a systems’ thing, yet she acted as it’s meatware. Water delivery systems are hardware. Doctors or nurses that have very little surgical or technical aptitude shouldn’t act like they’ve got that mojo or auctoritas, no matter what their last-century Cathedral credentials say. An interested TV repairshop kid would have given me better info on that device.

    An appropriately sized or scaled non-state business would not have ignored its customer so easilyinstitutionally. I also think they would provide a technician’s service, not some Socialist humanism with its human-discretion ideologised decisions. It’s top-down bureau-authoritarianism like this I meet again and again in State-run businesses (“institutions”). The trunk is rotten. Degenerate. We pay high taxes in Iceland and are supposed to get “free universal healthcare” or something like that, yet we have to pay for everything in each case still—there is no such thing as free l(a)unch indeed. This hi-tech digital machine, which I can just buy myself at Ebay or from the manufacturer, is rented out to “patients” which after some years means that you’ll have paid the State-run Hospital more than it would cost you to buy your own. What a deal. They say one is paying for the “service” but I got ~zero service. Just remnants of Northkoreaesque 20th century old-building institutionalism.

    I did get excellent service from one staffer (I think she’s a psychologist) there, but that was when I participated in an international study. And she just took my request of wanting copies of all data about me seriously, even took some photographs for me and sent me emails. But the doctors running the sleep research department, I’ve met, are overworked underpayed socialised grumps. There’s nothing more disgusting than seeing technical neutrality replaced or retarded by human superstition. Just ask Evola. We’ll call it ‘humanum’—short for humanum errare est.

    It’s funny—while writing this post I walked downstairs and there was on the evening news a report on overload in the healthcare system. It’s one of the most frequent topics of the news and discussion in Iceland. Often it’s seen as starved and outdated. Not capitalized. Not i-smart.

    I was naturally somewhat pleased yesterday to see there’s a new startup. And so successful. Nox Medical. It’s loaded with engineers, not “doctors”.

    The study I mentioned before was by, along with American entities, DeCode Genetics (Reykjavík).

    I just started my day of 29th April. Gonna get some coffee. It’s spiked with organic pure peppermint oil — I do recommend that!

    P.S. I recognize health as a term from system administration, e.g. hard drive health. It’s similar to a body, as when its health is approx. 100% it works fast. After certain deterioration it will work but slower, because it has become senile and starts confusing things (making errors). P.S.S: As someone relates on tomshardware dotcom » after purchasing a drive i use it for a month 2 months like 52 day 15 hour (showed by Hard Disk Sentinel).

    here is Scan Report please Cheak- C:\Users\AMD\Desktop\Disk report 2013 12 11.html

    now the i scan my Disk for problems with Hard Disk Sentinel scan → Report showes me that the Drive Health is 48 % right now. the drive is working right now but taking high load in loading ».

    Fortunately I’ve done calorie restriction for years. I think it will buy me some antisenility or health probability percentage measure.

    Incidentally, the term ‘mercy’ derives from a Latin word for merchendise: merx. See more in /sentences-89/

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 20th, 2017 at 6:04 pm Reply | Quote
  • Inevitably Right Says:

    ˌdɪsɛmˈvaʊəl‏
    @dsnvwl

    Following
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    Capital is the original xenomorph

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    Posted on May 20th, 2017 at 8:39 pm Reply | Quote

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