Ruin

What does Dark Enlightenment see when it scrutinizes our world?

This. (Exactly this.)

December 12, 2013admin 50 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations , World

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50 Responses to this entry

  • Mike Says:

    And who else to write it than a German with “Volk” in his name?

    I suppose this post has been prompted by Bryce (finally) writing about r/K. So we should probably give this guy a plug:

    http://www.anonymousconservative.com/

    I highly recommend his book (available on Kindle).

    And while we’re on the topic: http://www.eugenics.net/papers/caseforeugenics.html

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Bryce and I are in a strange state of quantum coupling at the moment, but the surface level prompt for this link was a twitter recommendation, shelved as something that looked interesting, and read an hour ago. It might be the single most devastatingly brilliant piece of historical analysis I’ve ever read — and Weiss can write as well as think and synthesize (it’s a continuous stream of aphoristic delicacies.) He’s in both my More Thought and Resources rolls now.

    As I suggested on twitter — The Dark Enlightenment in an adjective: Weissian.

    [Reply]

    Bryce Laliberte Reply:

    >Bryce and I are in a strange state of quantum coupling at the moment

    We must be. I should’ve supposed you would also post a link to this paper, as I just posted a link at my own blog.

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    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 3:21 pm Reply | Quote
  • Stirner Says:

    Ha! He even name checks La Griffe.

    This is a great find. I hope it gets wide dissemination.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    La Griffe, Hoppe, cybernetics, anti-democracy, anti-welfarism, anti-political correctness, deep fatalism … it’s one of those rare texts that seems to say everything you could ever imagine wanting to write.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 3:48 pm Reply | Quote
  • Stirner Says:

    “The full cycle requires the destruction of social order and a disorientation of female individuals away from the normal pattern of successful reproduction and rearing of offspring. Western societies call such behavior “emancipation” and “feminism.”

    Radish, give this guy a Reactionary Trading Card!

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 3:57 pm Reply | Quote
  • Lesser Bull Says:

    Frighteningly persuasive, but how can it peacefully coexist with singulitarian techno-futurism? Either Crazy Eddy will conduct us into the glorious future free from the Cycles, or he won’t. There’s no solution that involves both.

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    admin Reply:

    It certainly raises the relative probability of a ‘hard’ (nasty) Singularity, as techno-intelligence lifts away from the rotting debris of an imbecile species.

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    Contemplationist Reply:

    Elysium FTW

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 4:57 pm Reply | Quote
  • Puzzle Pirate (@PuzzlePirate) Says:

    We cannot return to the past, but perhaps we can turn the wheel of history forward.

    Does this make NR the agents of Nemesis? (Nemesis to modernity anyway.)

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    ‘Agents’ might be over-reaching slightly. (Annoying Cassandras?)

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 5:57 pm Reply | Quote
  • spandrell Says:

    Greg Cochran said IQ declines 1 point per generation… He has a lot to answer.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Wish I could say I found Cochran’s estimate more persuasive.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 6:10 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    Will this be the litmus test as to whether I’m a neoreactionary or not? I’m still pretty much on the fence in my own mind.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Hoping for a public excommunication that would get you taken off the NSA ‘people of interest’ list?

    [Reply]

    Mark Warburton Reply:

    Not at all. I’m one of the unter-kind of Vladimir’s typologies who’ve ended up buzzing around this sphere i.e. immature/prone to side with the underdogs. He reached deep into my soul and ripped a chunk out with such an accurate prognosis of the cretins the movement would attract.

    To be fair to myself I had a major bone to pick with the left in the first place, and at least I’m not a hipster to all this. I’ll give the paper a read and see what I score. I prefer your expression of libertarian-mugged-by-reality. It’s close to my position with less flash n’ bravado.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 7:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • Solex Says:

    Oh dear, so you really have been seduced by the Nazis. It won’t be so easy to deny an interest in white supremacism now. It’s always best to steer clear of people with names like People White. You may want to think he’s brilliant, but don’t dig too deep:

    Weiss: ‘IQ of Nazi leaders, cited from: Gilbert, G. M.: Nuremberg Diary. New York: Signet Book 1947, p. 34; Wechsler-Bellevue IQ: Hjalmar Schacht IQ 143, Arthur Seyss-Inquart IQ 141, Hermann Göring IQ 138, Karl Dönitz IQ 138, Franz von Papen IQ 134, Erich Räder IQ 134, Dr. Hans Frank IQ 130, Hans Fritsche IQ 130, Baldur von Schirach IQ 130, Joachim von Ribbentropp IQ 129, Wilhelm Keitel IQ 129, Albert Speer IQ 128, Alfred Jodl IQ 127, Alfred Rosenberg IQ 127, Constantin von Neurath IQ 125, Walter Funk IQ 124, Wilhelm Frick IQ 124, Rudolf Hess IQ 120, Fritz Sauckel IQ 118, Ernst Kaltenbrunner IQ 113, Julius Streicher IQ 106 – “confirming the fact that the most successful men in any sphere of human activity – whether it is politics, industry, militarism or crime – are apt to be above average intelligence.”‘

    All it confirms to me is that the most successful are… um, the most successful. Like many reactionary ideas, this is not an interesting conclusion, but merely a starting point – for education, freedom, and much that I’m sure you’ll all want to dismiss as progressive nonsense. Which might well lead to a collapse, but at least one that’s more fun and colourful than the gas chamber destiny of Weiss’s ideas – all very logical, of course, but thankfully there’s more to life than logic.

    [Reply]

    Queasy Antichristopherson Reply:

    His Body Without Organs Was a Playground for the Nazi Elite!

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Funny thing is, the Neo-Nazis use exactly the same argument, but directed against the Jews. Whatever you’re fighting, your most significant enemies are going to have high IQ.

    How does the magic power of gas chambers work again? Or was that just thrown in for rhetorical effect?

    Worth adding:
    (a) Those IQ estimates aren’t especially impressive for the elite of a major European regime, are they?
    (b) Weiss demonstrates that the Third Reich was a dysgenic cataclysm, even before the military ‘collateral damage’ is factored in.
    (c) Freedom would sort out the problem efficiently, but (as Weiss explains) democracy has closed down that off ramp.
    (d) ‘Education’ is mostly talking about climbing up the down escalator, while standing paralyzed on it, or actually tumbling down it.

    [Reply]

    Solex Reply:

    @ admin

    No, the figures are not at all impressive – I merely point out that Weiss seems very impressed by them.

    Rhetorical effect of gas chambers? Isn’t that exactly why they were used? I’m sure Weiss is one of those neo-Nazis who thinks the experiment didn’t have to end up with that particular solution, but the fact is that it did.

    Having climbed quite a long way up the down-escalator – like you yourself, unless you’re hiding some elite/aristo heritage – I can’t quite see your problem with education.

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    Scharlach Reply:

    I’ve climbed a long way up it, too, but whenever I get the “we need more education” tinglies, I fly home for Christmas and hang out with my family who never escaped South L.A. And I leave thinking, “This is why I’m a reactionary.”

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 7:27 pm Reply | Quote
  • Robert Says:

    The America 3.0 guys seem to be offering a way to partial amelioration of “inevitable” historical trends: Break the collapsing polity into smaller divisions with freedom to adopt a variety of ideas. Some will presumably choose to go “backwards” to policies and social norms that encourage the intelligent to have more children.

    The bottleneck would seem to be The Cathedral willing to make a deal that allows a portion of the U.S. out from under its control. Sure, they’d still have the coasts and most of the large cities, but the idea of Progressives peacefully allowing Racist Sexist Homophobes to run a piece of the former America unhindered and outbreed them seems as likely as winning the Lottery.

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    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 8:19 pm Reply | Quote
  • Puzzle Pirate (@PuzzlePirate) Says:

    I emailed him to see if his book “the IQ Trap” was available in English. Here is what he replied:

    “Dear Mr. Puzzle Pirate:

    Despite many proposals by colleagues “Die IQ-Falle” has not been translated in English.

    In the meantime I have published a far better monograph, see
    http://www.amazon.de/Die-Intelligenz-ihre-Feinde-Industriegesellschaft/dp/3902732016/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1339362939&sr=1-1

    This essay is a kind of summary of this book
    http://www.v-weiss.de/cycle.html

    [Reply]

    Scharlach Reply:

    Dear Mr. Puzzle Pirate

    lol.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 8:32 pm Reply | Quote
  • SGW Says:

    I sometimes wonder whether the consumption of human capital in places like Singapore is worth it. At times it simply looks like the place consumes mankind’s most gifted minds, a resource that is valuable and rather difficult to renew due to their pandalike nature, for the sake of bidding up the value of a bunch of condos.

    To be honest, the whole issue of IQ makes me curious as to whether East-Germany would’ve ‘beaten’ West-Germany if things went on long enough. Artificially lowering the time-preference of the intelligent through a lack of (alternative) investment opportunities is one way to get them to have more children.

    In a different paper made by Weiss he points out that in the DDR women who had graduated from university were less frequently childless than unskilled women, and that it’s eugenics policy had ramped up the German IQ to the level of East-Asians. In the long run the east would’ve had vastly superior human capital. How large would the IQ-difference have to be before the east could’ve beaten the west, despite it’s ‘inferior’ institutions?

    From a NR perspective, if a set of ‘good’ institutions are dysgenic and an opposing set of ‘bad’ ones are eugenic, which set should be supported? Could it be better to have a government that isn’t quite as responsive to the demands of our monkey brains, but instead is capable of focusing on things that don’t quite tickle our dopamine receptors, but which may for survival or aesthetic reasons be good to have anyway, such as developing Cthulhu-AI, improving the gene pool of mankind or creating beautiful, but rather chilly, cathedrals?

    I’m not really sure where I stand on these issues.

    The paper of Weiss I was referring to: http://www.v-weiss.de/iq-falle-ddr.html

    [Reply]

    Bryce Laliberte Reply:

    What makes an institution good is not whether it is ‘good’ for the most, but good for the best.

    [Reply]

    Saddam Hussein's Whirling Aluminium Tubes Reply:

    “I sometimes wonder whether the consumption of human capital in places like Singapore is worth it. At times it simply looks like the place consumes mankind’s most gifted minds, a resource that is valuable and rather difficult to renew due to their pandalike nature, for the sake of bidding up the value of a bunch of condos. ”

    I’m sure you’ve read this, but it is relevant for others:

    http://bloodyshovel.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/lee-kuan-yew-drains-your-brains-for-short-term-gain/

    Makes you look at our model techno-commercialist enclave with a more skeptical eye.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Yes, Spandrell at his most awkward. Once that splinter gets lodged in the brain it doesn’t work its way out easily.

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    SGW Reply:

    I actually don’t recall reading that article. Perhaps I had and have simply forgotten about it, since that part of my post basically looks plagiarized. I recall a story of a woman accidentally rewriting an entire children’s book her parents had always read to her, so it wouldn’t be unheard of.

    Anyway, I based that part mostly on an article called “Why We Haven’t Met Any Aliens”, it basically argues that mankind focuses on indirect ques that signal fitness and not actual fitness itself. This basically is bad because fitness-faking technology tends to evolve much faster than our psychological resistance to it. So many people become addicted to glorified skinner boxes, end up eating themselves to death or fail to reproduce due to being ensnared by the malevolent charms of the domestic cat.

    In a competitive environment where the possibility of exit is high one would expect governments to have a tendency to maximize their fitness faking. Why garden cities appeal to many seems to be for the same reason as to why supermarkets always have buckets of flowers at the front. Since this is how human minds work it can’t really be helped, but as you say, a certain degree of skepticism about the merits of systems that have a tendency to be very succesful at faking fitness is not unwarranted.

    The article in question: http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/why_we_havent_met_any_aliens/
    Dark enlightenment on cats: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2009/jul/13/cats-purr-food-research

    [Reply]

    Lesser Bull Reply:

    As the average IQ increased, it would have become increasingly difficult to sustain the repressive mechanisms that caused it to increase.

    [Reply]

    SGW Reply:

    I’m not sure, as the average IQ increases the repressive mechanisms would presumably also become more effective. Just think of the joke where a person gets to choose between going to German hell and going to Indian hell, with there being no difference except that Indian hell is run by Indians and consequently the torturers slack off frequently and there often are shortages in critical supplies, while in German hell everything runs like clockwork.

    A repressive IQ boosting state run by Germans would in all likelihood be capable of greater repression and greater IQ-boosting than a similar nation run by Indians. In the same way a repressive IQ boosting state run by homo superior would be better at what it does than a similar state run by ordinary Germany. Perhaps I’m overlooking something, but to me an IQ increase seems to have a neutral effect when it comes to this issue.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 10:39 pm Reply | Quote
  • Michael Says:

    population cycles are a classic example of chaos theory. Im no quant but the system harmonics destabilize leading to chaos and collapse there’s a really simple formula eventually spontaneous pairs emerge and a new rhythm is begun/ phase change in fluids – Lorentz

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    Posted on December 12th, 2013 at 10:59 pm Reply | Quote
  • Hypothetical Says:

    History isn’t cyclical. It’s dialectical without being teleological (I await the firestorm).

    There’s a glaring problem, as I see it, in that article: the conflation of democracy and Marxism (deftly summarized through recourse to Marx’s phrase “dictatorship of the proletariat”).

    The ancient Greeks might have developed democracy and theorized it, but they weren’t Marxists; far from it. Marxism was only possible at a specific historical moment. It isn’t just some reiteration of a previous philosophy. Our moment of industry and technology also isn’t a repeat of earlier centuries. The imagining of history has changed throughout history, and our current conception of it has only become possible in recent centuries. It’s misguided to think of ourselves as simply repeating some pattern or cycle because the material conditions in which (and through which) we experience history are vastly different from any other moment of human (or global) history.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    I agree that history isn’t strictly cyclical — it’s spiral crypto-teleological (without being dialectical).

    [Reply]

    Puzzle Pirate (@PuzzlePirate) Reply:

    There is a purpose to history but it’s hidden?

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    ‘Teleonomy’ (as accepted by reductionist materialism) simulates teleology to an arbitrary degree of adequacy. Either mechanism camouflages itself as purposive development, or the inverse — or our understanding of time is not presently competent to process the question successfully,

    In the latter case, the Aristotelian distinction between efficient and final causes would be the fragmented place-holder for an as-yet inaccessible integral comprehension. (‘Crypto-teleology’ designates this problem.)

    admin Reply:

    It might be clarifying to add: If we already comprehended it, it wouldn’t be a ‘place’ we can flee to (by thinking our way Out).

    Hypothetical Reply:

    >spiral crypto-teleological (without being dialectical)<

    I wonder whether or not your "spiral" contains elements of the dialectic itself. I'm sure you don't intend that, but the spiral is a prototype-model for imagining the dialectic.

    The dialectic is by no means inherent in nature or deep time; but it is inherent in history, and it registers multiple levels of historical development. The dynamics of historical development are always in dialectical concordance with one another because those dynamics are the result of multiple interactive forces that can only engage one another in a dialectical fashion.

    That said, there's nothing teleological about this, and I want to resist even the appearance of purpose in complex systems. The "purposes" of complex systems and/or organisms are only formal, never meaningful; their relationship to the world does not communicate an intentional meaning. They participate, rather, in the form of historical development itself, and this participation can never reduce to one side of the spectrum (i.e. organism or world). The meaning interpreted into this participation is only ever available in retrospect, and at that point the most popular or effective meaning becomes orthodoxy. This orthodoxy is where historical meaning comes into play.

    I encourage the deconstruction of historical meaning/content. I don't advocate an entire dismantling of historical form because I believe that it is only through a dialectical engagement with the world that we maintain the possibility of critiquing it.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Dialectics is designed to stop things escaping. It works for the Left, and only for the Left.

    etype Reply:

    I think you’re almost there – it is a pseudo-teleological geodesic – only the corruption of the original Ursprach or tongue by various philological experts has caused this fact to become unclear and undefined

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 13th, 2013 at 3:08 am Reply | Quote
  • Hypothetical Says:

    @

    I’m sorry, but that sounds like little more than fear-mongering. Assigning a political imperative to the dialectic is ridiculous in itself (considering there have been dialecticians on the “Right”), and believing that its intention is some malicious attempt at capture is even more so. I suppose this goes hand in hand with fear of the Cathedral, but I’m entirely opposed to the idea that private (I emphasize, private) institutions are involved in a kind of conspiracy to brainwash the public and enforce a concrete, imprisoning dialectic via militaristic or ideological political measures.

    The illusion that you perceive as intentional malevolence on the part of the Left and Academia is nothing more than an effect given off by, once again, the same complex systems and emergent phenomena that you claim to be at work in reality itself. There is no helmsman, no puppet-master. The dialectic isn’t even necessary to make the accusation against your claim. If the real world reduces to nothing more than complex systems, desiring machines, then it’s entirely arbitrary to separate out our cultural development from this historical form. If the theories about complex and emergent systems are accurate, then our society might qualify as just another example of a highly developed complex system. You can’t prove it one way or another.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Dialectic is essentially totalizing. ‘Right’ dialecticians are still statists. “Intentional malevolence” is beside the point. And of course our society is “a highly developed complex system” — what else could it possibly be?

    [Reply]

    Hypothetical Reply:

    We agree then; but a complex system can’t be reduced to the successfully realized intentions of a select few (i.e. the Cathedral). I’m saying there’s a way to recontextualize your horror-inducing vision that doesn’t explain it as the evil actions of an elite NWO; it may just be the process of a complex system as yet unrealizable.

    The dialectic is a totalizing process that never realizes totality; again, non-teleological. How do we reconcile narrative and meaning with a meaningless world? Simply abandoning it isn’t enough, since this would also deny and preclude the value of consciousness; and embracing it totally is to unflinchingly embrace its content without the critical faculty. The dialectic is merely the means of retaining historical consciousness whilst being critical of that same consciousness.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    I don’t mean to be condescending, but you’re not at all understanding what is meant by the Cathedral if you think it is reasonably described as “the successfully realized intentions of a select few”. It’s a social teleonomy (or self-organizing system), which produces structures of intention, far more than it results from them. If the Cathedral was a conspiracy, it would be vastly less robust than it is.

    Posted on December 13th, 2013 at 2:16 pm Reply | Quote
  • The Last Couple Weeks in Reaction | The Reactivity Place Says:

    […] links to this (PDF): Weiss, Volkmar, The Population Cycle Drives Human History—from a Eugenic Phase […]

    Posted on December 13th, 2013 at 5:31 pm Reply | Quote
  • Hypothetical Says:

    @admin

    No need to worry about condescension; I’m new at this neoreaction thing.

    I just have trouble making the connection between the Cathedral as a self-organizing system and your distanced critique of it. If Weiss et al are interested in processes, in a very broad, global sense, then I’m uncertain how to objectively classify the Cathedral (if it counts as deterministic process) as something malicious and/or detrimental. It’s the same with disease; politicizing the matter merely obscures the quality of the disease as something unintentional and meaningless (I’m not saying the Left is innocent of this; but neoreactionism responds in an equally political manner). It might be teleonomic, but that’s a retrospective critique.

    To put my concern more plainly: if neoreactionism’s problem with the Cathedral is that it is obscurantist and detrimental, then why the approach through emergence and complexity theory? I don’t see how this achieves any strong political argument against the institutions. If anything, as I see it, it favors political organization and development as historically self-organizing systems. For what purpose are we to resist these systems? I’m having difficulty seeing this as anything other than deconstruction with a stubborn conservative, anti-politicist bent.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    As a dialectician, you cannot conceive critique without opposition.
    As a xenomist, I am quite confident that it requires only Outsideness.

    [Reply]

    Hypothetical Reply:

    Oppositions, or binaries, are products of thought; they don’t subsist in reality. We establish binaries as concepts in order to deploy thought and/or moments of critique. Through the interrogation of these binaries, we can see how they interrelate and break down.

    Outsideness is also an illusion; any time you critique something, you participate in its existence and thus alter its ontology, even to an infinitesimal degree. There is no such thing as entirely objective critique; or, rather, objectivity can only be asymptotically approached through our realization that we participate in the object of our critique.

    I’m not attempting to convince you of anything, and I don’t expect to; this has been more for my own understanding of the concepts at work here. There’s a point where, eventually, people just have to agree to disagree.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Comprehended cybernetically ‘oppositions’ are entirely real (as marked by ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ feedback links). Dialectics systematically scrambles these real polarities, however, until the resulting mess seems compatible only with subjective attributions.

    “There’s a point where, eventually, people just have to agree to disagree.” — a commendably civilized conclusion.

    Posted on December 13th, 2013 at 5:58 pm Reply | Quote
  • Kgaard Says:

    I have now read this German essay three times. It is staggering in its implications. I basically agree on all points. However … I do have to add … that the kind of implosion he’s expecting in Latin America is not really happening. Mexico City is getting better, as are Bogota, Medellin, Santiago and especially Lima. Perhaps smaller family sizes in Latin America are offsetting dysgenic breeding patterns. I’m pretty sure that’s what’s happening, actually. I will say that Buenos Aires is precisely the dystopian hellhole one would predict from his analysis of historical processes …

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 22nd, 2013 at 4:59 pm Reply | Quote

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