Sentences (#68)

The Economist, on “The New Political Divide”:

Mr Trump has sucked confidence out of global institutions as his casinos suck cash out of punters’ pockets.

There’s a lot going on in this sentence (much of it valuably suggestive).

XS is beginning to think that, due to the exceptional coherence of its evil, The Economist makes a better representative of Cathedralism even than the New York Times.

(Back to SH HQ within two days — so dormancy ending.)

August 2, 2016admin 48 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy

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48 Responses to this entry

  • Brett Stevens Says:

    Wasn’t there some line about us knowing a leader of greatness when all of the dunces are united in confederacy against him?

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    Information Machine Reply:

    > The importance of making enemies.

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    pyrrhus Reply:

    And especially, making all the right enemies, or more properly, all the globalist enemies…

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    Apatheos Reply:

    The trump myth is overwhelmingly about opened vs closed, an expression of universalist anxiety. But what is the closed, and can it be nuanced and rigorous with a political figure so well known? Beyond thiel is there any articulation of what trump really offers individualism, techno commercialists?

    [Reply]

    Ryan Reply:

    Jonathan Swift, “When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.”

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    S.C. Hickman Reply:

    One could always reread A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole who took Swift to heart:

    A green hunting cap squeezed the top of the fleshy balloon of a head. The green earflaps, full of large ears and uncut hair and the fine bristles that grew in the ears themselves, stuck out on either side like turn signals indicating two directions at once. Full, pursed lips protruded beneath the bushy black moustache and, at their corners, sank into little folds filled with disapproval and potato chip crumbs. In the shadow under the green visor of the cap Ignatius J. Reilly’s supercilious blue and yellow eyes looked down upon the other people waiting under the clock at the D. H. Holmes department store, studying the crowd of people for signs of bad taste in dress. Several of the outfits, Ignatius noticed, were new enough and expensive enough to be properly considered offenses against taste and decency. Possession of anything new or expensive only reflected a person’s lack of theology and geometry; it could even cast doubts upon one’s soul.

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    TheDividualist Reply:

    I can only hope Carlyle was not wrong with the heroic view of history. (I.e. that one exceptional man, even against a huge opposition can still do a lot.)

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    Transport manufacturer Reply:

    How would you think he could be wrong when history is full of examples?

    Up your rationalism kid. Get your ass out of the gorge of opinions.

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    Because you´re inferior Reply:

    >muh history isn´t an exact science

    If you define ‘hero’ as something purely fantastic, yes, they only exist in fantasy. If you define it as e.g. one man changing history for the better, then those are thousands.

    ▬{ hero (n.1)
    late 14c., “man of superhuman strength or physical courage,” from Old French heroe (14c., Modern French héros), from Latin heros (plural heroes) “hero, demi-god, illustrious man,” from Greek heros (plural heroes) “demi-god,” a variant singular of which was heroe.

    This is of uncertain origin; perhaps originally “defender, protector,” and from PIE root *ser- (1) “to watch over, protect” (see observe). Meaning “man who exhibits great bravery” in any course of action is from 1660s in English. Sense of “chief male character in a play, story, etc.” first recorded 1690s. Hero-worship is from 1713 in reference to ancient cults and mysteries; of living men by 1830s.

    In Homer, of the Greeks before Troy, then a comprehensive term used of warriors generally, also of all free men in the Heroic Age. In classical mythology at least from the time of Hesiod (8c. B.C.E.) “man born from a god and a mortal,” especially one who had done service to mankind; with the exception of Heracles limited to local deities and patrons of cities. }

    What mundane 3rd grade rationalists typically miss, in their pseudointellectual motion of “hey look how smart I must be because of how dis-miss-ive I am, [which causes me remarkably to miss things]” is that ‘demigod’ is a fancy way of referring to a person with top-tier qualities. Say if “the Iceman” Richard Kuklinski, Peter Thiel and Otto Skorzeny were one man. That´d be a demi-god. Add Napoleon or Ceasar — and you got a god on earth.

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    Because you´re neither superior, nor inferior; nor equal Reply:

    Amusing. The iceman I had in mind is one Wim Hof. The one mentioned previously—Kuklinski—would make it a far less interesting mix (of qualities, traits & dispositions), and more on the asuric side rather than the devaic.

    Why? At least because he is less of a builder.

    Posted on August 2nd, 2016 at 8:58 pm Reply | Quote
  • Anon Says:

    >much of it valuably suggestive

    Trump is a vampire?

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    Cryptogenic Reply:

    Trumpire … I like it.

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    John Hannon Reply:

    Count Trumpula

    But the punters are the real suckers.

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    Chris P. Michael Reply:

    The Mike Pence choice makes sense now…
    http://imgur.com/YnTXuHb

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    Uncle Saturday Reply:

    …some of those who have been with Justinian at the palace late at night, men who were pure of spirit, have thought they saw a strange demoniac form taking his place. One man said that the Emperor suddenly rose from his throne and walked about, and indeed he was never wont to remain sitting for long, and immediately Justinian’s head vanished, while the rest of his body seemed to ebb and flow; whereat the beholder stood aghast and fearful, wondering if his eyes were deceiving him. But presently he perceived the vanished head filling out and joining the body again as strangely as it had left it.

    Another said he stood beside the Emperor as he sat, and of a sudden the face changed into a shapeless mass of flesh, with neither eyebrows nor eyes in their proper places, nor any other distinguishing feature; and after a time the natural appearance of his countenance returned.

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    michael Reply:

    I really hate that classist shit ut wtf is with midwesterners and food

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    Johan Schmidt Reply:

    The joke is that his daughter’s reflection isn’t visible.

    Posted on August 2nd, 2016 at 9:07 pm Reply | Quote
  • grey enlightenment Says:

    Although the The Economist leans left, they are good for for taking the pulse of the zeitgeist and sometimes they entertain anti-populist views

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    Cryptogenic Reply:

    Merely leans left? Only sometimes anti-populist? Are we reading the same magazine at the dentist?

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    grey enlightenment Reply:

    they are neo liberal, which to the far-left is like the right but to us is very leftt

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    Kgaard Reply:

    The Economist is fundamentally a horrible magazine. Bad economics, dumb politics, blandly written. Useless as a tool or guide for anything. Nobody in the actual field of economics or finance gives a damn about it. Maybe they did 15 years ago, but literally I have not heard someone mention the Economist in a professional context in over a decade. It’s just a waste of time.

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    michael Reply:

    yes but i bet the quadrupled their readership in that time, its just the type of bullshit cover libs love the pretense of science to justify your voodoo

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    Xoth Reply:

    At one time, perhaps a decade ago, I found it quite useful in teaching me how politics works. The front part of the paper, if you will. But at some point, there was a decline, they switched into bureaucracy-love, and. I lost interest. Not much insight to be gained these days, it seems, and if you take these articles seriously you get negative improvement.

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    Anon Reply:

    It’s always been seen as terrible by those in the know.

    It’s been rumored for years that the majority of anonymous writers for The Economist are grad students from Oxbridge and other UK elite unis, and that they continue this practice to this today (kinda like the informal old boy’s networks for recruiting British spies on universities). Paraphrasing Michael Lewis (of Liar’s Poker and Moneyball), who apparently found out who many of the Economist authors were (back in the 80s and 90s), it’s a magazine written by young people LARPing as old people.

    When Nick says in the OP that it is more representative of the cathedral he is not wrong. The Economist is mainlining elite prog propaganda straight from the source.

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    Posted on August 2nd, 2016 at 10:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • michael Says:

    “News that strengthens the anti-globalisers’ appeal comes almost daily. On July 26th two men claiming allegiance to Islamic State slit the throat of an 85-year-old Catholic priest in a church near Rouen. It was the latest in a string of terrorist atrocities in France and Germany. The danger is that a rising sense of insecurity will lead to more electoral victories for closed-world types. This is the gravest risk to the free world since communism. Nothing matters more than countering it.”

    silly me i thought the “danger” from all this terrorism was death and dismemberment./ some moxie using the red scare as a comparison

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    Xoth Reply:

    Yours is a vulgar definition of danger, unsuited to our modern society.

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 4:20 am Reply | Quote
  • Melanie l'Heuremaudit Says:

    Word gets around and I heard some cuck or libfag was going to be hanged outdoors at the Triple Tree.

    Or boiled & burned, then drawn and quartered

    Have I come to the right place?

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    michael Reply:

    No thats over at jims, here we make them dance on pins

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 11:13 am Reply | Quote
  • Alan J. Perrick Says:

    The Economist makes a better representative of Cathedralism even than the New York Times.

    Indeed, and it’s frankly embarrassing how venal depraved and unsaved man can be…

    A.J.P.

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 11:28 am Reply | Quote
  • Melanie l'Heuremaudit Says:

    @ michael

    “No thats over at jims, here we make them dance on pins”

    LOL….works for me…

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    michael Reply:

    welcome

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 1:42 pm Reply | Quote
  • Eldrick Says:

    “the Flagship publication of Clown World”

    The NYT must h/t American sensibilities, lest it lose legitimacy at home. The Economist is pure Internationale, unburdened by American parochialism, mythos, etc.

    A lot going on indeed, flagging confidence in failing Global Institutions to be laid squarely at Trump’s feet. The Cathedral is tipping its hand.

    A centrist Trump will buy the Cathedral a lot of time, a massive reality compensation sink soaking up carnage and redirecting blame to ghosts of Progress’ past.

    If Trump doesn’t go full [INSERT CARICATURE HERE], well.

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 3:52 pm Reply | Quote
  • grey enlightenment Says:

    major bitcoin hack..a lot of money missing

    [Reply]

    Arian Cryptochrist Reply:

    muh bitcoin

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    yeah … lovely, finex got what they deserved. bitfinex manipulation with swaps last year brought btc price down to usd/216. I never trusted them and would not be surprised to any kind of further development.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    https://bitcoinwisdom.com/markets/bitfinex/btcusd

    on vocations

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 6:35 pm Reply | Quote
  • vxxc2014 Says:

    Good call Admin – agree. Economist is Cathedral Flagship. Nothing to do I’m sure with SARBOX making London the “Global” financial capital [less regulation than NYC].

    Globalism is simply transnational looting. Nothing more.

    Anyone who is President inherits Full SOMETHING.

    As for the global institutions it’s a global shell game with no money left under the shells. They’ve looted all the money and are playing for time. Hillary would buy some time they think.
    She might well set off CW2 in earnest.

    Trump they fear will open the books and turn over all empty shells.

    Anyone who adjusts this creaking gigantic Global pile of Jenga sticks will bring it down, or they’ll keep adding sticks [read – stealing more] and it comes down anyway.

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    michael Reply:

    you know i think if they were not what they are theres still a chance to make the rest of the world suck it refinance ours at negative rates backed by the biggest nuclear arsenal but theyre too stupid and greedy they think they can steal just a little more a little longer where the fuck do they think they will run?

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    Posted on August 3rd, 2016 at 11:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • anonyme Says:

    @ Vxxc2014

    “Trump they fear will open the books and turn over all empty shells”

    +1

    [Reply]

    Posted on August 4th, 2016 at 2:15 am Reply | Quote
  • Melanie l'Heuremaudit Says:

    The media is blaming the latest knife attack in London on a “Norwegian Somalian”

    ha ha…..nice try, shitlibs….

    [Reply]

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    Guardian headline: “Suspect is a Norwegian Somali with ‘no evidence’ of terror.”

    Just try to make sense of that. What does that even mean?

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    4K Reply:

    Who the hell cares?! Shadayim! Focus, people, focus!

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    michael Reply:

    I think we are at a point where the people get it that ethnicity is obscured when inconvenient etc i bet the lefty all read somalian just like we did and everyone did I think the press even decided against leaving out the somali bit because it would be at this point more conspicuous by omission but yeah theyre trying the hes not a crazy terrorist hes a terrorist crazy bit no one’s buying the distinction

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    Posted on August 4th, 2016 at 3:51 pm Reply | Quote
  • Melanie l'Heuremaudit Says:

    It means progs are losing their religion and their kumbaya world view, so they’re doubling down.

    Bring on even more diversity, double the number of Afro-Islamic immigrants, and whenever they attack and kill people screaming “Allahu Akbar!!”, progs new strategy is to say they’re “puzzled by the motive” so they blame it on “mental health issues”

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    John Hannon Reply:

    You don’t have to be mad to be an Islamic terrorist, but it helps.
    (The Met police claim ISIS are now specifically recruiting lunatics)

    Meanwhile, that gargoyle-faced, giggling ladything, Matthew Wright, on his excruciatingly Cathedralist talk show, keeps insisting that most of these recent terror attacks have nothing to do with terrorism, as defined in the dictionary, as they are not politically motivated. And then of course in the next breath he’s saying that we have nothing to fear from mentally ill people as they are overwhelmingly more likely to harm themselves. So clearly nobody is responsible and nobody is to blame, except perhaps white men and Capitalism.

    BTW, from today’s Metro –

    “Thomas Salbey – the 57 year-old man who yelled and threw a beer bottle at Munich mass killer Ali Sonboly, !8 – is being investigated by police and may face charges of insulting him.”

    Beam me up, Scotty.

    [Reply]

    Posted on August 4th, 2016 at 8:43 pm Reply | Quote
  • Melanie l'Heuremaudit Says:

    But you already knew that, so you might as well laugh at this example of the Shitlib Face:

    https://heartiste.wordpress.com/2015/04/22/the-shitlib-face/

    [Reply]

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    Some backs cry out for the knife.

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    michael Reply:

    that CH what are the chances of those feminist breeding

    [Reply]

    Posted on August 4th, 2016 at 8:51 pm Reply | Quote

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