Sentences (#76)

Andrew Sullivan:

You are where your attention is.

(Among much else of interest in an excellent contrarian essay I’ve only just got around to.)

October 17, 2016admin 28 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Media

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28 Responses to this entry

  • darkreformation101 Says:

    I must spend two to three hours every day hunting for information on the web. It is an obsession. Terrorist attacks, cathedral lies, reactionary blogs, foreign policy sites. If Trump loses, or if he doesn’t cross the rubicon, then I’m going to adopt the “benedict option” and bug out.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    What would you do instead?

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    TheDividualist Reply:

    Talk to all the people who would be willing to talk if only they were not on the phones all the time?

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    Posted on October 17th, 2016 at 3:59 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    “Did you really survive HIV to die of the web?”

    Typical iPhone user.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 17th, 2016 at 4:24 pm Reply | Quote
  • Thales Says:

    The coffeehouses my friends and I used to hang out in back in the 90’s were busy and noisy. Every table was alive with conversation, and making new acquaintances was to be expected.

    Went back to one our standards a few months ago after a 10-15 year hiatus. What a shock. The place was full, but like a morgue, every solitary face underlit by laptop or cellphone. My buddy and I took the empty central table where we used to hold court back in the day, yet felt compelled to confine our voices to whispers since a normal tone of voice would be as a shout.

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    Kgaard Reply:

    The great question is how to re-invigorate real-time human interaction.

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    Kgaard Reply:

    That comment is so short as to be a platitude, but I literally think about this question ALL the time.

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    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    simply, integrate fleshcontact or flesh-proximity w/ online video gaming.

    Alrenous Reply:

    Cut immigration to zero, indeed negative if at all possible, and outlaw newspapers etc.

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    Thales Reply:

    It is a hard problem. It starts with Liberty and capitalism. Those beget consumerism, which is made more lucrative by narcissism and atomization. Cyberspace exacerbates the problem by creating bubble societies and crowdsourced superegos. Epistemic closure soon follows — so why would you want to talk to anyone anyway? They might disagree and trigger you! The world ends not in fire, but in ice.

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    Cryptogenic Reply:

    On the other hand, why would I want to talk to anyone since I might trigger them and find myself in serious, livelihood-compromising trouble,mor accused of sexual harassment or worse?

    Reading the article I kept wondering, “Don’t you have a home and a set of earplugs?” What is with this obsession in finding peace or whatever outside, with others, where you can be noticed being alone? I disconnect every day and make coffee or read book length works or play with my cats. My weekends are silent and last-man-on-earth.

    But I was always told that this “mindfulness” was bizarre, possibly even dangerous, indicating someone with a massacre in the works or something. Someone who needed to be “reached.”

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    +4

    the other comments are truly reactionary.

    John Hannon Reply:

    If, instead of coffeehouses, you’d hung out in bars or pubs, this just wouldn’t be an issue – indeed places like the French House in Soho specifically ban the use of mobile phones –

    http://frenchhousesoho.com/

    Only problem is people tend to end up talking a load of drunken bollocks in such places.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 17th, 2016 at 4:44 pm Reply | Quote
  • Alrenous Says:

    Cut immigration to zero, indeed negative if at all possible, and outlaw newspapers etc.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 17th, 2016 at 5:32 pm Reply | Quote
  • Melanie L'Heuremaudit Says:

    “We live in a world where there is more and more information, and less and less meaning.”

    Baudrillard

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    Cryptogenic Reply:

    “The medium is the message.” –McLuhan

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    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    “the message is the macroeconomics.”

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    rekt Reply:

    the process is the punishment.

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    D. Reply:

    Since the number of books flowing onto the market increases continually, in the course of time the books form a kind of umbrella — i.e., they form a shield against the critics — and they frustrate an encompassing selection, something the critics do not realize for a long time because they are still fishing the “best” titles out of the stream of the market. However, they do not see the books that, although they are just as good as the ones picked out, or even better, remain unknown to them.

    Selection no longer encompasses the whole quantity of published material, and this cultural area converts itself into a blind lottery. But this lottery takes only a marginal part in the selection of values. In due course, we can see that true values in abundance can have the same effect as a devastating flood. If they abound, these values begin to destroy themselves because they block all the filters intended to select them. Thus the fate of literature as a whole can become quite the same as that of trivial literature. Perhaps culture itself will be drowned in the Great Flood of information.

    -Stanislaw Lem, “Science Fiction: A Hopeless Case — With Exceptions”, 1972

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Thanks for that reference. (I’m going to have to steal it.)

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    D. Reply:

    This essay is found in English in the collection Microworlds, and is a translation from the German of a revised version of Lem’s earlier essay in Polish “Fantastyka i futurologia” from 1970.

    I stumbled across this while searching for a pithier quote, which I’ve now realized is from the essay “One Human Minute” in the book of the same name:
    One might think that the technology of communication had advanced for the express purpose of revealing to us the microscopic capacity of the human brain. What good is it if everything that is beautiful lies at our disposal, and can even be called up on the screen of a home computer, if we are — again — like a child facing the ocean with a spoon?

    Ironically, if I possessed electronic versions of Lem’s works, then I would have been able to quickly and easily locate this quote but would have missed the other one.

    Posted on October 17th, 2016 at 5:59 pm Reply | Quote
  • Thales Says:

    But I was always told that this “mindfulness” was bizarre, possibly even dangerous, indicating someone with a massacre in the works or something. Someone who needed to be “reached.”

    His outer SPWL needs to get in touch with his inner SPWL, hence the meditative retreat.

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 17th, 2016 at 10:16 pm Reply | Quote
  • Dick Wagner Says:

    We have to watch out that Moldbug’s “virtual option” isn’t pulled on us.
    http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.com/2009/11/dire-problem-and-virtual-option.html

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    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    is moldburg a millennial, not that he wrote this but he writes similarly. this is millennial american something

    ▬ Suppose you’d written a book. And suppose, for some odd reason, that your middle name happened to be “And”. Suppose, for example, that mother had named you “Cary And Grant”.

    there´s a problem w/ men today. and one of them is an over-active imagination.

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    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    amusingly, moldburg makes the same point as I do when he states: One might as well ask: if I were God, what would I do about mosquitoes?

    now to truly use the word correctly: most thought is retarded.

    retarded means e.g. underdeveloped.

    or wrongly developed.

    funnily, @SanguineEmpiric said of Brett Steven´s thought recently that it is underdeveloped. and “a teenage nihilism.”

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    Posted on October 18th, 2016 at 3:16 am Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    Are you in conversation with West, Nick? He seems to be towing the fragmentation line…

    http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/10/defence-small-nation-states/

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 18th, 2016 at 12:24 pm Reply | Quote
  • darkreformation101 Says:

    @ Erickkson

    What would I do instead?

    Pretty much the same. I was writing a book on Islam and then, by accident I discovered Moldbug and he answerd many of the questions I had. It was a paradigm shift.

    What would I do if none of this shit was happening. Teach philosophy, practice Zen, read science-fiction, write a novel, get married.

    BTW Moldbug is about 45 or something — not a millennial.

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    Posted on October 18th, 2016 at 1:58 pm Reply | Quote
  • Pseudo-chrysostom Says:

    “A man sees in the world what he carries in his heart.”

    [Reply]

    Posted on October 19th, 2016 at 9:24 pm Reply | Quote

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