Stereotypes

The Less-Evil Twin hasn’t been on its best behavior recently. Discussing the prospects for Accelerationism (following this negative prognosis), it quite innocently suggested:

… and it was already over the line.

[‘bet’ should be ‘best’ (not ‘better’)]

That’s where things paused for a while.

(You’ve heard of her, right? It’s a superbly intelligent play off the Shanzhai idea.)

[‘to’ should be ‘too’, of course]

(I’ve no idea what secret treasures await extraction from that final tweet yet.)

May 28, 2014admin 45 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations , Humor

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45 Responses to this entry

  • Hurlock Says:

    “Pwned by DNA”
    T-shirt slogan?

    That paper on accelerationism is…disturbing, sad, stupid, comical? I think all of those apply, but the most important one is that it was expected.
    To summarize it:
    “Guys, everyone knows we are practically communists so let’s stop pretending.”

    Yes, it was about time.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    “Practically?” — I think they’re overt and proud communists. If the Left lapses back into that mode I expect mass tune-out from overwhelming tedium. (Noys almost seems to welcome that.)

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    At least it got this right → » The embrace of the present is the only route to saving the future and the only true exit from our present moment. » (Benjamin Noys, 2014).

    There is no future, the future is now. Non-fiction, coming at you like pow.

    There’s only a projected future, a possibility. Passivity-activity matrix.

    I.e. product placement or word-of-mouth. Future-design, or, future-doom. Product planning or product death.

    ▬» a small company must have an exit strategy for its product in case the product does not sell. Product planning entails managing the product throughout its life using various marketing strategies, including product extensions or improvements, increased distribution, price changes and promotions. »
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_planning

    Unconditional acceleration of whatever happens is anti-capitalist. It is sub-bolshevism. Utter faggotry. No successful business is run like that. It’s a dork’s dream nightmare. Nihilist. Leftoid. Vacuous. Vain.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 12:32 pm Reply | Quote
  • Cicada Says:

    This is the worst way to write dialog ever.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Unfortunate, because I’m getting hopelessly addicted to it.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 12:48 pm Reply | Quote
  • NRx_N00B Says:

    haha, I’m liking the trollage, I like it a lot….keep er’ goin.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 1:32 pm Reply | Quote
  • Ganesh Says:

    transport the world to the sonic dark side

    Don’t you know we are surrounded by a web of emotional influences?

    Take David Bowie’s last album. David Bowie is a far more venerable–and loved–father figure in our culture than, say, David Cameron. He is an icon. When you see this album cover, it affects you. When the music video for “Where are we now?” was shown on television for the first time, a strange melancholy came over the presenters.

    So, when the world hears this music and the theme from The Phantom of the Opera, they are being transported; it is as significant as, and of exactly the same kind as a communication from the Pope during the Medieval era.

    Now when I watch this performance, I can see that…something…is going on, and it’s not only out-of-mainstream; it’s outside the outside-the-box box. Yet it’s popular culture. So, in the Internet age when anything can in theory achieve wide circulation, that’s of interest to eccentric contrarians. It’s terribly silly, but then aren’t we a silly species when David Bowie has to arbitrate our mortal quarrels.

    Hashtags are mantras and rallying cries that instantaneously achieve wide circulation. When we read hashtags, we imagine the mob of people reading the same text and experience a little thrill of power. Apart from a platform like Twitter, viral circulation is theoretically possible but again requires an outside-the-outside-the-box-box feature, a style that disrupts the flow of ordinary thought.

    So, quirky prose and aesthetic experiments of a popular character are to be expected from unusual contrarians in the Internet era. These are some of the memetic battlegrounds, whatever one’s values and interests, are they not? (To expand, before this thought becomes explicit might we not be more concerned with the contours of the battleground than our inconsequential participation in the battles?)

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 2:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • Lesser Bull Says:

    My DNA informs me that I like your new condescension implant.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 2:31 pm Reply | Quote
  • Stirner (@heresiologist) Says:

    That is a fascinating dialog.

    I am amazed at the apparent universality of the wow (or wow just wow) reflex that progs consistently manifest.

    When you frame the race talk in racial terms, focusing on blacks, the prog mental immune system seems to shrug off the bad thoughts automatically. But as soon as you frame the race talk in terms of the Chinese, you get an immediate wow in response. The wow seems to be a last ditch effort to delegitimize their opponent before the bad thoughts start to get fully formed in the prog mind.

    Time to wow seems like a useful metric for NRx memetic warfare.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    My sense of what’s going on among the more decent blue-pillers is something like: “You’re not seriously going to make me talk about this?” It’s about fundamental social integration — defense against thoughts that immediately incur massive stigmatization, shunning, and group punishment. I’m not unsympathetic, actually. There’s a cruelty involved in transforming effective cognitive denial into self-conscious hypocrisy, which is fine when dealing with the witch-burning types, but more problematic when inflicted on the doing-what-it-takes-to-get-by folks. Still, given the inevitability of the dam breaking within the next decade or so, there’s no real option but to push forwards.

    [Reply]

    Lesser Bull Reply:

    I’m pretty sure that the ‘there is no such thing as chinese people’ is always and everywhere already self-conscious hypocrisy

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    Nothing to do with legitimacy. Nothing to do with race really. It’s all about guilt as far as I am concerned. Pure disembodied guilt. The leftist being puritan heirs seek out guilt everywhere – race grievances, homosexuality grievances, climate change anywhere they can get some guilt leverage going so they can get their guilt fix. It’s a very European thing. Just exchange “you are racist” for ” you are guilty”, or “that’s racist” for ” that’s something you should be guilty of” and you get the same effect.
    The beauty of the whole thing is that if *we* are guilty, then something can be done to correct it, which is ultimately empowering to the leftist. Guilt and empowerment can be very popular and cause people to do so seriously crazy things – just look at the Skoptsy.

    [Reply]

    Peter A. Taylor Reply:

    I don’t think Progs are driven by sincere feelings of guilt. They think they are vastly superior to their competitors for social status, and it’s those competitors who should feel guilty. Progs don’t think *they’re* guilty of anything much, except not being morally superior enough.

    [Reply]

    Chris B Reply:

    “Progs don’t think *they’re* guilty of anything much, except not being morally superior enough.”

    Sure, it’s collective guilt which “we” (aka white people) should feel. They become angry that other’s don’t feel this guilt (non liberals) therefore have to demand/ force us all (white people) to feel guilty. They are enlightened/ superior/ closer to god because they feel this guilt.

    I’ve come across some interesting academic studies on this –

    http://www.academia.edu/719028/White_Guilt_and_Racial_Compensation_The_Benefits_and_Limits_of_Self-Focus

    http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic1230881.files/Reedeming%20Apartheid_s%20Legacy.pdf

    Shalmaneser Reply:

    “I realise that from over there Cornwall must seem futuristic and exotic but rly it’s not that dangerous these days”
    Bold words coming from someone in peninsular Whiteopia…

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 3:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • Kgaard Says:

    I am at a loss to understand why anyone over 35 listens to electronic music. It is such an insult to human aesthetic sensibility — and thus by extension human emotional sensibility. I can only think we’re dealing with an Idiocracy-like decay in ability to appreciate what music IS (and what real emotion is). Reading the Elliot Rodger manifesto one sees all the signs of a culture that has lost the ability to feel anything (except perhaps anger). Music is a big part of that decay — and one could argue that music has gotten worse as anglos have become a smaller percentage of the total music market (just as movies have gotten worse for the same reason). As a minor example of how good even “schlocky” stuff was in the ’70s, here is Karen Carpenter … on drums:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dJUnh6N8-U

    [Reply]

    Steve Johnson Reply:

    It’s amusing when people try to use Elliot Rodger to make a point and get it one hundred eight degrees wrong.

    One of the asshole’s videos on youtube is him driving around in his car playing some music. Electronic? Uh, no – Stevie Winwood.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    @Kgaard

    Well, not to beat this to death because I grant that the Elliot Rodger connection was a thin-ice one to begin with … but the issue is less whether HE was listening to electronic music than whether everyone else was.

    I think the original argument stands. Electronics do to music what xanax does to experience: flatten the edges … take off the highs and lows of the tones. Neil Young used to fulminate against what CD technology was doing to recorded sound (by destroying the quality of the notes) and he was exactly right. Electronic music just loses so many nuances. I mean … would you rather look at that Dead J dude sitting there in a T shirt turning a bunch of knobs or look at Karen Carpenter playing drums while simultaneously singing four-part harmonies? I don’t even understand why it’s up for debate. (And of course she is only a mildly compelling example.) Everywhere I travel now I take earplugs because the morons who dominate the restaurant trade feel fit to jam modern-day noise down my ear canals while I’m trying to eat. It is Idiocracy in action.

    Anyway, the ultimate point is really that music is a dead art form, just like painting and sculpture. Electronic “music” constitutes its death throes …

    [Reply]

    Lesser Bull Reply:

    C.S. Lewis is good on the function of noise.

    E. Antony Gray (@RiverC) Reply:

    Music choice is as much about signaling as it is about taste at this point, and music is such an intrinsic part of the culture that it is hard to disentangle the two. If the point is to comment on Rodger’s music taste as indicative of his spiritual state, you’d have to know his real music tastes, which would likely not be indicated by a youtube video he was using to present a public image of himself in. Secondly, there are other less savory reasons to listen to different types of music and not all music from better days was all uniformly good.

    This all being said, there is some very good electronic music as well, but unfortunately the disintegration of the popular music market has made discovery much more difficult.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Speaking of Rodger, his manifesto has like 5 million views on Scribe, which I believe makes it the publishing even of the year. If I were a screenwriter I would be pouncing on this thing. It’s going to be a $200 million movie easy. The manifesto has something for everyone!

    Contemplationist Reply:

    As Tyler Cowen has written, the best of any genre of music is likely to be good. It’s the median that probably varies far more.

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 3:48 pm Reply | Quote
  • Stereotypes | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 3:53 pm Reply | Quote
  • J Arthur Bloom Says:

    What is the #NRx position on vaporwave? I’m probably the only person in the universe who would like to read a post on this.

    I suppose this isn’t a bad place to start: http://www.dummymag.com/features/adam-harper-vaporwave

    But TMT is definitely better, they were all about it a year or two ago:
    http://www.tinymixtapes.com/music-review/virtual-information-desk-contemporary-sapporo
    http://www.tinymixtapes.com/music-review/internet-club-vanishing-vision

    Like so much electronic music I find it more conceptually interesting than musically interesting, but in terms of a sonic dark side this might be it. I’ve been told by someone who’s actually peeked behind the pseudonyms and anonymity that a lot of its practitioners are transgender, which may or may not be significant (to either the music or the anonymity).

    [Reply]

    nydwracu Reply:

    I don’t expect anyone here to have the patience to keep up with the myriad electronic music microgenres that Tumblr generates.

    I think I used to follow the Internet Club guy on Twitter — vaporwave is at most one degree from the vague cloud of post-grunge/Windows 95 nostalgia/ghost bee egg stuff, which is itself only one degree from the post-LF hyperprog crowd that decided they were all trans en masse one day, so that last sentence doesn’t surprise me at all.

    The videos in that article remind me of Jimmy Joe Roche, so it’s not like the general aesthetic is all that new.

    [Reply]

    Contemplationist Reply:

    This comment makes me feel like 60 years old an I’m in my late twenties.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 6:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • Izak Says:

    Re: the original point about electronic music innovation, I personally agree with Jojo Hiroshige from Hijokaidan: “noise is the last genre.”

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 8:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • VXXC Says:

    There’s no equality until the males of other races are chopping their dicks off in puritanical guilt.

    The work of Progress is never done. What comes after chopping your actual dick off, having long since been castrated in all other ways?

    [Don’t actually answer].

    Ready yet?

    PS what was my time to wow on that one?

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 11:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • argus Says:

    “…Not an ideological fantasy just assumption based on sheer weight of numbers and electronics.”

    This sounds a lot like the infinite monkey theorem. Pre-thoughtcrime?

    [Reply]

    VXXC Reply:

    my time to wow on infinite monkey was 1.3 secs

    Look maybe stop this. If the Vogons chop their dicks off too who will staff the lower orders* of Civil Service?

    *That’s as close as Jacksonians can get to admitting lower orders. It’s an emergency.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 28th, 2014 at 11:16 pm Reply | Quote
  • spandrell Says:

    @urbanomicdotcom @turingcop is “omg omg omg” supposed to be some kind of exhibition of natural rhythm?

    Instant classic

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 29th, 2014 at 12:59 am Reply | Quote
  • Ex-pat in Oz Says:

    Inflection point or false dawn?

    http://bit.ly/1nXMuHG

    [Reply]

    Peter A. Taylor Reply:

    But what definition(s) of “racism” is the writer (Allison Pearson) using? My college roommate circa 1980 defined “racist” as anyone who’s winning an argument with a “liberal”. Pearson uses the word for its negative connotations, and deplores that these connotations are shifting, but she gives me no reason not to think that my roommate’s definition is as good as any.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 29th, 2014 at 7:01 am Reply | Quote
  • Imperfect Humanoid Says:

    ‘Accelerationism is being abandoned’

    Oh, late to the party again…

    Hilarious exchange, it couldn’t be more obvious that races and tribes have their own rhythm agendas. As for accelerating sounds, there’s always the unsubtle:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm41yV1gOcA&list=RDNm41yV1gOcA

    Recommended mainly for the looping cartesian-machine reverbs which give the track its name. A friend likened their album to the sound of ‘humans being experimented on’, though I probably wouldn’t praise it quite so highly.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 29th, 2014 at 12:26 pm Reply | Quote
  • NRx_N00B Says:

    Ex-pat in Oz Says:
    May 29th, 2014 at 7:01 am

    “Inflection point or false dawn?”

    admin Reply:
    May 28th, 2014 at 3:40 pm

    “—snip—Still, given the inevitability of the dam breaking within the next decade or so, there’s no real option but to push forwards.”
    —————–
    ….and the response? Increasingly totalitarian suppression of dissent that will shake the very foundations of Western society to the core. Fasten your seat-belts, we’re in for one hell of an interesting ride.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 29th, 2014 at 2:14 pm Reply | Quote
  • technohead Says:

    A new pulse of darkside electronic music innovation would help.

    Check out the techno coming out of Europe at the moment, especially from labels like Stroboscopic Artefacts, Prologue, Ostgut Ton, Ilian Tape, and Zooloft. It combines dark ambient with detroit, dub, and berghain techno. It ends up sounding ominous, and makes for great late night driving music.

    Examples:

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8zvzFgfVac&w=560&h=315%5D

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZHzRkNhXf8&w=560&h=315%5D

    There are also some neat podcasts/radio shows for those that want more:

    https://soundcloud.com/deep-space-helsinki

    https://soundcloud.com/smokemachinetaipei

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 30th, 2014 at 9:32 am Reply | Quote
  • SaturnIn Says:

    Ironically, Katy Perry is in fact the very height of neo-aristocratic artistic output.

    One day, AIs will marvel over the intelligence incarnate in the nexus that is, for example, dark horse. Through her there is dominance (a first requirement of aristocracy– it wins) and a neurocracy (the second requirement) with a meritocratic invitation to the few.

    You just don’t see it ‘cos you’re not aristocrats. You’re publics who want to be smarter than the rest of the public. Fledgling intelligence seeks a differentiated form for itself to secure the growth of its character. Greater intelligence plays a game of image and invisibility. It can communicate itself through many images, buildling itself into a ladder of interpretations where nobody ends up in the wrong affiliation by accident, because intelligence and stupidity are never on different sides. Each and all are on the side of manifest stratification.

    If you perceieve that you are on the losing side, or a side that hasn’t won yet, that’s usually a hint that you’re not understanding your station. It can be hard to perceive this though, when neurogenetically unable to make the correct links. Malcontents are what we might think of as an inferior class’ abortive attempts at sentience. This take the form of a stepping back, a ‘that’s not me’, a theory, a shielding identity.

    So malcontents are sort of demiurgic, Satanic, built from lies; Katy Perry, contrarily, partakes in the true body of God and his natural hierarchical order.

    [Reply]

    Lou Reply:

    “‘cos” we don’t “perceieve” dat Katy Perry iz Goddess we’z peons.

    [Reply]

    SaturnIn Reply:

    Typos or not, it’s true. Your life is a lie.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Saturnin — You are onto something with this Katy Perry comment. Been thinking about it for a few hours now. Yes, she is part of some sort of aristocratic set. Yes, I don’t get it artistically. Right there we have a disconnect. So what is her power? It’s something like this: All these female singers today are really proteges of Madonna. And what emotion does Madonna elicit from the listener? Longing? Desire to love the singer? Desire to marry the singer? Hardly! None of the above! It’s something else. For Madonna and her ilk music is about projection of power. They succeed at that. But the end result is something close to pornography. Hence it’s no coincidence that Katy Perry often performs in hot pants. That’s what she is selling. If she were not hot her whole schtick would not work.

    For the proper contrast, think back to the 70s. It was really a golden era of female chanteusses: Rita Coolidge, Carole King, Linda Ronstadt, Karen Carpenter, Stevie Nicks. What emotion did THEY elicit when you heard them? It was more of a desire to POSSESS them — as in love, protect and marry. I’m thinking here of something like Rita Coolidge’s cover of Boz Scaggs’ “We’re all alone,” or of course Linda Ronstadt singing “Blue Bayou.” Half the women in my ’70s list weren’t even all that attractive. Rita Coolidge and Carole King were about average. Karen Carpenter at her peak had a girl-next-door appeal.

    So the upshot here is that there has been an emotional collapse in the artistic effectiveness of popular music as sung by women over the past 40 years. Music is now one more dead end for man attempting to access certain types of sensitive emotions. This is one of the reasons I made my defense of the New Agers a couple months ago. If all these art forms are dead, the “way in” to reclaiming emotion is probably through recovery of certain high-intensity spiritual practices — the specialty of the better of the New Agers.

    [Reply]

    SaturnIn Reply:

    Incidentally in the more informed classes we have a way of categorising psychologies that gets at something of what you’re talking about. In relation to the New Agers, a heavily represented type is one who, as your comment suggests, is driven by something like emotional harmony, purity and equilibrium. That’s a qualitative way of describing what’s actually a mathematical psychological program, that’s fully predictable.

    Types like this writing music now include Daughter, Azure Ray, and, like her or not, Lana Del Rey. The first two at least seem beautiful and heartful enough to me, if that’s what you’re into. Not sure why you would want beautiful hearts raised up before the gaze of an unappreciating public, as the popular acts of the day. Pearls before swine, and all.

    Unless of course the swine decide they’re on the side of the pearls. And so pearls must be what is put on public display for all to see and trample.

    In many New Age groups you’ll find the emotional predisposition found in that kind of music manifested as a hopeful ontology. A protective lie. You’ll also find quite a few of these girls on, funnily enough, tumblr, because progressive world-peace feelings are more often attractive to them than eugenics some-people-are-better feelings. More heart, you know.

    The New Age is also a massive cointel bullshit machine, full of fantasists, charlatans, and anybody else able to get people to pay them to help be distracted from reality. NRx serves a simliar function, but from a different angle.

    NRx similarly manifests an entirely deluded ontology designed to protect a certain psychology from reality. In this case it is one whose core function (of a number arranged in strict hierarchical relation) is the concept of ‘do not know’. Or– ‘must find out’. This combined with a number of politicising/state-of-the-tribe type functions. It tends to come up with new… formulations, in answer to its questions.

    Contrarily most of the top political players have a simliarly structued, politicised psychology combined with the idea of ‘do know’ as prime imperative, a kind of databank what-has-been-true-before, program. It seeks to maintain and keep implicit but dominant. Unlike the do not know, who want to bring their great discovery out for all to see. Guess which one predominates in aristocratic lines.

    The main error of do-not-know type is that they tend to come from plebian stock and end up in corresponding worldviews. I doubt there are many people of significantly aristocratic blood in NRx. The main issue with this is not extreme lack of intelligence, but just a lack of being versed in the way that everything’s meant to be interpreted, the hierarchy of languages and rhythms by which culture is meant to be accurately read. I.e. they don’t know what situation they’re in. They are too blinded by the ‘brilliance’ of their new ideas.

    Thus you have a movement of unformed, vague dissatisfaction (a very common trait to this psychology, with its searching) predicated on some kind of vague rejection and tendency towards finding out a bit more truth than average. But with no grounding in the real meaning of the lies, or of what is already in place, or the true meaning and mode of functioning of class. It’s quite absurd when such a rabble ends up backing, of all things, aristocracy.

    I can’t rule out NRx being backed by some real players as some point, just as libertarianism has been, but its members are not real players. They don’t know what’s going on, and have too much attachment to the very few answers they’ve found. Meanwhile real aristocracy operates all around them. Everything touted as revelation in these circles has been known to anybody with real power and insight throughout.

    And the same will rise, and the same will fall.

    [Reply]

    nydwracu Reply:

    For Madonna and her ilk music is about projection of power.

    A common pattern, and one that we really need a better name for than whatever can be cobbled together from Lasch’s books to refer to it.

    [Reply]

    Kgaard Reply:

    Nydwracu — Good point. No idea what the word would be.

    Saturnin — That Lana Del Ray is a poster child for maximal time preference. “Born to Die” is an anthem to having fun TODAY with tattooed bad boys. Interestingly, this style of music is very popular in Eastern Europe, as the women there aspire to be like their western sisters. They basically have enough money to pull off a lower rent version of it right now in the capitals of Eastern Europe (i.e. Kiev), hence you hear it everywhere.

    Posted on May 30th, 2014 at 1:03 pm Reply | Quote
  • IN THE BLOOD II (PWND BY DNA) | Zombi Diaspora Says:

    […] recent twitter spat between Robin Mackay (Urbanomic) and Nick Land over at Outside/In has prompted me to write a second ‘In the Blood’ […]

    Posted on June 26th, 2014 at 12:06 pm Reply | Quote

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