Posts Tagged ‘Education’

Twitter cuts (#112)

February 10, 2017admin 35 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations
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Chaos Patch (#90)

(Open thread + links)

Collectivism vs capitalism (plus). Versions of antipolitics. Another Nithgrim parable. “NRx“.
The weekly round.

World War III (or ‘Cerberus‘). Over-extended? Turkey shoot. On the Kurds (1, 2). Saudi swingers (also). Belgian waffle. If Schengen goes, the Euro follows. Sweden, economics, and ethnicity. Stasis in China. Vibrancy-deprived Japan (see also). Argentina flips. East-Anglian global hegemony. England‘s ISIS. Laugh at Corbyn while you still can (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Nothing new, but faster.

Mapped terror. What ISIS wants (also). Coldness. Dabiq online. More Islamania (1, 2, )

Go forth and multiply (or not). The demographic key to stagnation.

A Trumpenführer panic selection (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6). Coddling the underclass. Culture matters. Leftist lunacy watch (1, 2, 3, 4). Heterodox academy.

Freeman Dyson on books. Superforecasters (Quillette is great). Delicate feelings. Lucretius among the ruins. Interview with a ‘resilience guru’.

Life as information. Spreading darkness. Darwinian religion. A second breath for antibiotics? “… we test the prediction that selection will disproportionally remove neutral variation in species with large population sizes.”

A taxonomy of machine intelligence start-ups. Electrobotany. Teaching robots to rebel. Tech made simple. Phobos with a reason. Terraforming titan.

Charlie Rose interviews Lee Kuan Yew (Oct 2009).

November 29, 2015admin 29 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos
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AAA … II

There follows an XS-endorsed message from Henry Dampier:

… we can’t make the omelet of perfect, universal justice without breaking some eggs. […] The presence of White men in any classroom, owing to their historical record, can be profoundly triggering to women and people of color. To protect their historic victims – to give them mental and physical space for them to flourish – we must keep White men away from the university, and by blocking them from those institutions, we must keep them far away from political power, also. […] We have tried reform. We have tried patient education. It has not worked. Harsher measures will be required. The world can’t wait.

(For reference, AAA …)

September 11, 2015admin 7 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations
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Worrying

Very crudely re-stated, Moldbug’s Cathedral concept says that whatever is happening in the universities is an authoritative rough draft of what society more generally has coming to it. Politics is downstream of prestige culture, which the academy commands. So this is huge.

The American academy has become a self-propelling anxiety machine, in which steadily-consolidating totalitarianism and mental disintegration have been run-together into a circuit of amplification that no one knows how to turn off. Haidt and Lukianoff call it “vindictive protectiveness” driven by “emotional reasoning” which it in turn (nonlinearly) promotes. It corresponds to a systematic transfer of incontestable authority towards feelings of grievance. Questioning the dynamic is considered to be “blaming the victim” and thus a heinous crime in itself. Everyone gets out of the way, if they’re not indeed joining in. Madness intensifies. (It’s classic Left Singularity machinery.)

Nearly all of the campus mental-health directors surveyed in 2013 by the American College Counseling Association reported that the number of students with severe psychological problems was rising at their schools. The rate of emotional distress reported by students themselves is also high, and rising. In a 2014 survey by the American College Health Association, 54 percent of college students surveyed said that they had “felt overwhelming anxiety” in the past 12 months, up from 49 percent in the same survey just five years earlier. Students seem to be reporting more emotional crises; many seem fragile, and this has surely changed the way university faculty and administrators interact with them.

The universities — being craven concentrations of cowardice, when not actively evil — are scared to tell their students to stop being scared. Radical feedback runs away unchecked. Victimological terror is sovereign.

This is what is coming down the tracks, so fast that the headlights have started to dazzle people. Take a look at the future. It’s screaming.

August 12, 2015admin 64 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Collapse
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Quote note (#178)

Intense:

The academy demands a total identification with its principles, practices, and values. It’s like a religion, and sometimes it’s like a cult. If you leave it, there will be a void. You will lose your sense of self. You’ll lose a large chunk of your social network and support system. You’ll lose the future that you anticipated for yourself. Acknowledging these losses is essential to the grief and eventual healing process. You can relate all of this to Kübler-Ross’s stages of grief. […] I urge every client that I work with on the post-academic transition to seek professional help with a therapist …

August 12, 2015admin 8 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Humor
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Demography is Destiny

For a blast of sudden, icy clarity, this is worth recalling:

After decades of American Ed theorists and politicians grumbling about our low ranking on international tests, we now know that, as Steve Sailer summarized in 2010, reviewing the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) results from the previous year:
* Asian Americans outscored every Asian country, and lost out only to the city of Shanghai, China’s financial capital.
* White Americans students outperformed the national average in every one of the 37 historically white countries tested, except Finland (which is, perhaps not coincidentally, an immigration restrictionist nation where whites make up about 99 percent of the population).
* Hispanic Americans beat all eight Latin American countries.
* African Americans would likely have outscored any sub-Saharan country, if any had bothered to compete. The closest thing to a black country out of PISA’s 65 participants is the fairly prosperous oil-refining Caribbean country of Trinidad and Tobago, which is roughly evenly divided between blacks and South Asians. African Americans outscored Trinidadians by 25 points.

Racially disaggregate a conundrum that has tortured progressive education reformers for over a century, and it entirely disappears. Non-discrimination is mental and cultural chaos.

April 16, 2015admin 35 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations
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Quote note (#123)

The sense of an ending:

As George Steiner once put it in conversation, “The humanities have had 23 good centuries — don’t get greedy or upset that it happens to be coming to an end.” Let’s no longer say, “How can we save the humanities?” Instead, let us admit, “Liberal education is over. What do we do now?”

October 28, 2014admin 16 Comments »
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Quote notes (#96)

American higher education is “primed for creative destruction” notes The Futurist:

Student loan debt has tripled in a decade, even while many universities now see no problem in departing from their primary mission of education, and have drifted into a priority of ideological brainwashing and factories of propaganda. Combine all these factors, and you have a generation of young people who may have student debt larger than the mortgage on a median American house (meaning they will not be the first-time home purchasers that the housing market depends on to survive), while having their head filled with indoctrination that carries zero or even negative value in the private sector workforce.

July 24, 2014admin 21 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy
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Attention Economy

rkhs put up a link to this (on Twitter). I suspect it will irritate almost everyone reading this, but it’s worth pushing past that. Even the irritation has significance. The world it introduces, of Internet-era marketing culture, is of self-evident importance to anyone seeking to understand our times — and what they’re tilting into.

Attention Economics is a thing. Wikipedia is (of course) itself a remarkable node in the new economy of attention, packaging information in a way that adapts it to a continuous current of distraction. Its indispensable specialism is low-concentration research resources. Whatever its failings, it’s already all-but impossible to imagine the world working without it.

attention0

On Attention Economics, Wikipedia quotes a precursor essay by Herbert A. Simon (1971): “…in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.” Attention is the social reciprocal of information, and arguably merits an equally-intense investigative engagement. Insofar as information has become a dominating socio-historical category, attention has also been (at least implicitly) foregrounded.

Attention Economics is inescapably practical, or micro-pragmatic. Anyone reading this is already dealing with it. The information explosion is an invasion of attention. Those hunting for zones of crisis can easily find them here, cutting to the quick of their own lives.

Continue Reading

July 19, 2014admin 16 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Media , Political economy
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Quote notes (#88)

Charles Ponzi, call your IP lawyer. This is the kind of argument that makes sense when pursued without the distractions of STEM training:

… the humanities crisis is largely a positive feedback loop created by stressing out over economic outcomes. Research by government bureaus held that people who studied STEM disciplines had better employment prospects. As a result, state and federal education budgets consistently made these subjects a priority. Enrollment in the humanities slumped, and this made it more difficult for budding humanists and artists to succeed, not least because fewer and fewer jobs were available in the academy.

Humanists are being educated to teach the humanities in higher-education, why can’t anybody see there’s a model there that, like, could totally work?

June 7, 2014admin 10 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Pass the popcorn
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