Posts Tagged ‘Exit’

Quote note (#355)

This is going to be good …

In today’s crowded societies, once again many people are feeling the drive to break away from existing cultures and establish their own institutions. Ignorant of human history, most people treat such an idea with scorn. The world of the here and now is the only real world, they say. Talk of starting a new country is “escapism.” One’s duty is to direct one’s energies toward making contemporary society a better place to live. And so on. But those who know better realize that schism is the fundamental human method for dealing with frictions within groups of people. In fact, it has been so for so long that factors predisposing people to break off from one group and start another may even have seeped into the human gene pool …

(Via.)

XS emphasis, with the addition: Inclination to this method is evidently unevenly ethnically distributed.

May 29, 2017admin 56 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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Jacobite

A new online magazine for the Exit-oriented right.

Honored to be in the first issue (with an essay on Accelerationism), along with Andrea Castillo, Edward Waverley, Chris Morgan, and Mark Lutter.

May 28, 2017admin 87 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Media
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Twitter cuts (#122)

The 21st Century is definitely getting its act together.

March 15, 2017admin 16 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Internet
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Quote note (#337)

Hengest on Bill Bishop and Tiebout Sorting among the (in this case specifically Anglo-Saxon) nations of America:

Rather than [the] borders dissolving between cultures and populations, the various nations are actually becoming further differentiated with time. This concept is demonstrated in The Big Sort by Bill Bishop. Bishop argues that Americans are segregating themselves into like-minded geographic regions at increasing rates with the onset and ease of long-distance travel. Basically, the various Anglo-Saxon regions are more strongly becoming themselves.

If this is actually the trend, the motor of dynamic geography (running Patchwork-type geopolitical arrangements) should work fine.

There needs to be much more work done in the field of Entropic and Negentropic Trends Emerging in Dynamic Social Distributions. It would tell us who’s going to win this thing.

March 1, 2017admin 19 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Coordination
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Twitter Cut

@Outsideness has been zapped by Twitter without any explanation (as of yet). It’s probably a useful hint that it’s past time to look more diligently for a censorship-resistant platform.

This prompted me to give minds.com a look. It’s still in beta, and will probably take a while to get used to, but there’s an @Outsideness account now if anyone’s tempted to experiment with exodus.

I’ve had trouble getting through to Gab.ai (might be a VPN / China Internet issue).

We’ll have Urbit eventually.

ADDED: I haven’t sought out a fight with Twitter, but had I done so it’s hard to imagine there could have been a way to hurt it more than getting Outsideness banned in this way. There’s simply no possible case to be made that this is about ‘abuse’. There has been nothing remotely like harassment in the history of the account. It’s naked thought control. The platform is an undisguised leftist ideological operation. First it collapses down to a partisan bubble with zero credibility beyond its own constituency. Then it dies.

ADDED: Twitter @Outsideness restored this morning. No explanation (or communication from Twitter of any kind) about what just happened. The word that comes to mind for this kind of arbitrary aggressive behavior is abuse.

February 24, 2017admin 162 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Admin
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Slippage

Watch the whole of modern political confusion expose itself in a micro-tremor:

Locke’s commitment both to voluntary religion and voluntary, contractual government are mutually reinforcing. Just as people join and remain in religious communities by their consent, so they enter and sustain political communities. “Men being, as has been said, by Nature all free, equal, and independent,” Locke writes in the Second Treatise, “no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent.” If the members of a faith community believe their church is failing to uphold its spiritual responsibilities, they have a right to leave — without fear of reprisal. Likewise for a political society: If its members believe the political authority is failing to safeguard their natural rights — their “lives, liberty, and estates” — it forfeits the right to govern.

(XS emphasis.)

“Likewise”? Yet one leaves a church, but replaces a government. The fall from liberty into democracy takes only a single false step. With a little more consistency, the case for Exit-based control of government would have been solidly made centuries ago (intrinsically secure against all Rousseauistic perversion). Still, it’s not too late to do that now.

February 16, 2017admin 36 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy
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Quote note (#331)

Ace:

I don’t want revolution, I don’t want “resistance,” I don’t want violence. I don’t want to make others live under my heel (despite the fact they dearly wish to make me live under theirs). […] I just want Done. I want Gone. I want Goodbye.

— The wave of the century.

February 13, 2017admin 76 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations
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Twitter cuts (#97)

Woah.

October 27, 2016admin 23 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Events
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Quote note (#275)

From James C. Bennett’s indispensable book The Anglosphere Challenge: Why the English-Speaking Nations Will Lead the Way in the Twenty-First Century (2004), on the genealogy of the Neocameral State (though he doesn’t call it that):

The lowering of transaction costs for international financial activities in the 1960s started to allow major corporations and banks to take advantage of the lower tax and regulatory burdens of tax havens such as the Netherlands Antilles. Corporations became sophisticated consumers of “sovereign services,” in this case, venue of incorporation. In doing so, they built on a trend started by 1920s shipowners, who had increasingly sought Panamanian and Liberian registry for their ships.

Continue Reading

August 17, 2016admin 66 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy
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Quote note (#272)

Frederick Jackson Turner, from his essay The Significance of the Frontier in American History (1893):

From the conditions of frontier life came intellectual traits of profound importance. The works of travelers along each frontier from colonial days onward describe certain common traits, and these traits have, while softening down, still persisted as survivals in the place of their origin, even when a higher social organization succeeded. The result is that, to the frontier, the American intellect owes its striking characteristics. That coarseness and strength combined with acuteness and inquisitiveness, that practical, inventive turn of mind, quick to find expedients, that masterful grasp of material things, lacking in the artistic but powerful to effect great ends, that restless, nervous energy, that dominant individualism, working for good and for evil, and withal that buoyancy and exuberance which comes with freedom — these are traits of the frontier, or traits called out elsewhere because of the existence of the frontier. […] Since the days when the fleet of Columbus sailed into the waters of the New World, America has been another name for opportunity, and the people of the United States have taken their tone from the incessant expansion which has not only been open but has even been forced upon them. He would be a rash prophet who should assert that the expansive character of American life has now entirely ceased. Movement has been its dominant fact, and, unless this training has no effect upon a people, the American energy will continually demand a wider field for its exercise. But never again will such gifts of free land offer themselves. […] For a moment, at the frontier, the bonds of custom are broken and unrestraint is triumphant. There is not tabula rasa. The stubborn American environment is there with its imperious summons to accept its conditions; the inherited ways of doing things are also there; and yet, in spite of environment, and in spite of custom, each frontier did indeed furnish a new field of opportunity, a gate of escape from the bondage of the past; and freshness, and confidence, and scorn of older society, impatience of its restraints and its ideas, and indifference to its lessons, have accompanied the frontier.

Recollected with reference to the prospects of seasteading and space colonization, and their continuity with a distinctive Anglophone cultural impetus to resolve political tension through dissociation in space (with Exit as its key).

August 14, 2016admin 52 Comments »
FILED UNDER :History
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