Posts Tagged ‘Exit’

Sentences (#62)

Fernandez:

the winning position of the anti-Left position is merely to exit and prosper.

(It’s about Brexit, but it could be about anything.)

June 30, 2016admin 47 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Practicalities
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Sentences (#55)

Collapse traps people:

You have to know when to leave.

Most don’t, and won’t, of course.

(Treat this as a promissory note on an installment of provocative skepticism viz the ‘eventually its necessary to stand and fight, or even take things back’ proposition that haunts NRx like a chain-rattling ghost, now more than ever, in the shadow of the impending Trumpenreich. Zombie-fighting-types can assume that the tacit XS stance (“flee you fools”) is at least as infuriating as they would expect it to be.)

May 24, 2016admin 17 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Collapse
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Doctor Gno II

The Kokomo is meant to be a sort of home base, where travel enthusiasts can jet off in their helicopters or boats — or submersible yachts. Migaloo also has a concept for a yacht-submarine hybrid that super-villains probably can’t wait to get their hands on. Seriously, this company is inspiring us to come up with so many movie plots. (Source.)

KA00

From ABC: “No more being stuck in one spot. This private island floats. … The island — which will feature a penthouse, jungle deck with waterfall and an alfresco dining area — would be the first in the world to run on its own power, according to the company. … The inclusion of vertical gardens, palm trees and even a shark-feeding station ‘add more natural elements to the nautical island,’ according to the company.”

Exit technologies are going to be difficult to stop.

Hard security still needs some work, which is why the Bond Villain theme arises so predictably. Inter-state level deterrence capability can only be a matter of time. To quote deep-cover neoreactionary basilisk sorcerer Eliezer Yudkowsky: “Every eighteen months, the minimum IQ necessary to destroy the world drops by one point.” So all that’s needed is patience.

Doctor Gno is a cold type. He’ll calmly wait for as long as necessary to operationalize the escape strategy (but hopefully not much longer).

“Shark-feeding” or throwing people out of helicopters — is it even a question?

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April 21, 2016admin 50 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Trends
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Brexit

Brexit00

Making the case for Brexit water-tight:

If the English vote to leave the EU, the Scots will vote to leave the UK. There will then be no Britain. Meanwhile, the shock of Brexit to a continent already staggering under many crises could spell the beginning of the end of the European Union.

ADDED: It’s a trend.

February 22, 2016admin 59 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Pass the popcorn
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Flea Politics

One time-tested way to shed parasites is to take a dip:

Foxes will actually take a stick when they have fleas and get into the water slowly. They let the water raise up to their necks and hold the stick up in the air. As the water goes higher up their face, the fleas will climb higher. Eventually the fox will just have it’s nose out of the water while holding the stick. The fleas will climb up the stick and the fox will sink under the water and let the flea infested stick float down the river to the flea’s watery grave.

As Balaji Srinivasan remarked (on Ultimate Exit): “… but the best part is this: the people who think this is weird, the people who sneer at the frontier, who hate technology — they won’t follow you out there.”

Did you really think it was going to be that easy?

Space de-colonization is already preparing to queer-up the escape trajectory:

As venture capitalist space entrepreneurs and aerospace contractors compete to profit from space exploration, we’re running up against increasingly conflicting visions for human futures in outer space. Narratives of military tactical dominance alongside “NewSpace” ventures like asteroid mining projects call for the defense, privatization, and commodification of space and other worlds, framing space as a resource-rich “frontier” to be “settled” in what amounts to a new era of colonization … […] we have to stake a claim in the territory of space programs now. We need to add our voices, perspectives, plans, our cares. There isn’t time to wait. We can’t sit back and say: Space isn’t urgently important, we should be looking at problems here on Earth. First of all, much of space science is looking at and working on problems here on Earth (from conflict, migration, and drought to climate change, deforestation, and more). Secondly, SpaceX, Boeing, and others are preparing new craft and taking humans into space now — and human technology is leaving the solar system. Perhaps it’s not happening on the timeline you would prefer, but it’s already happening and has been for decades, and they’re pretty much doing it without us … So what’s next? We — all us queer, trans, disabled, black, native, etc. folk and more — we need to fight back, take back, de-colonize and re-imagine our futures in outer space, we need to pop up where they least expect us. (Emphasis in original.)

Leaving those ‘cares’ behind is going to take a colder exit.

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January 29, 2016admin 44 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Strategy
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Geopolitical Arbitrage

Stross:

… things will get very ugly in London when the Square Mile and investment banking sector ups and decamps for Frankfurt, leaving the service sector and multiethnic urban poor behind.

The specifics of this prediction are nutty, if only because mainland Europe is going down the tubes much faster than the UK, but the abstract anxiety is spot on. The globalization of the right is entirely about geopolitical arbitrage (while that of the left is about homogenizing global governance). All the critical trends point towards the exacerbation of the ‘problem’. The 21st century is the epoch of fragmentation — unlike anything seen since the early modern period — shifting power to the footloose, and away from megapolitical systems of territorial dominion. Being left behind is the rising threat, and we can confidently expect to see it consolidating as the subtext of all leftist grievance. You can’t just leave. Watch.

The obstacles to geopolitical arbitrage — i.e. spatial Exit pressure — are security constraints. It requires defensible off-shore bases (and Frankfurt most certainly isn’t going to provide one). Eyes need to be fixed firmly on secessionary dynamics (fragmentation), techno-commercial decentralization of hard security, crypto-anonymization, artificial intelligence, and the emergence of capital outposts in the Western Pacific region. More exotic factors include opportunities for radical exodus (undersea, Antarctic, and off-planet), facilitated by territorial production (artificial islands). The machinery of capture needs to keep all of these escape routes firmly suppressed in order to perpetuate itself. That simply isn’t going to happen.

Capital is learning faster than its adversaries, and has done so since it initially became self-propelling, roughly half a millennium ago. It’s allergic to socialism (obviously), and tends to flee places where socialist influence is substantially greater than zero. Unless caged definitively, eventually it breaks out. Over the next few decades — despite ever deeper encryption — it should become unmistakable which way that’s going.

January 18, 2016admin 39 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy
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Twitter cuts (#39)

Realistically, economic opportunity on a new frontier is likely to predominate as the driver for geopolitical disintegration, but “Where do I have to go to get away from these people?” is worth carving on the gate of an Exit-based polity. It’s Elysium, and probably the right-most impulse of the present world order. The Cathedral basically coincides with the answer: Nowhere. It’s not an allowable incentive. Still, it’s already a huge incentive (in fact), and every week it gets more huge.

Running the entire immigration crisis through this question is (darkly) enlightening. Anything that might count as a positive answer is probably our stuff.

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December 8, 2015admin 14 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Political economy
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Quote note (#204)

If there’s a downside to this, it’s well-hidden:

Richard Yonck, writing in the Scientific American, calls the recent “passage of the Space Act of 2015 in the U.S. House and Senate” the Dawn of the Space Mining Age. In essence, it “gives any American who successfully extracts natural resources from outer space the property rights over the haul.” The act has angered those who believe the cosmos should be free from the greedy scourge of capitalism. For the first time in human history, celestial objects, once the property of all because they were inaccessible to everyone, can be bought and sold by those who can reach them. […] … At stake is not only the biggest Gold Rush in human history, but the greatest territorial expansion since the Age of Discovery. Most products built from space resources will be left outside of earth’s gravity well and men will go up to join their products rather than return them to Terra. Exploration means diaspora.

Off-world development is going to take a while to catalyze, but it’s ultimately where everything that matters is going to happen.

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November 30, 2015admin 41 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Events
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Bargain Base

Suddenly, with private space activity re-setting the cost calculus, all kinds of things become realistic:

… a new NASA-commission study has found that we can now afford to set up a permanent base on the moon, by mining for lunar resources and partnering with private companies. […] Returning humans to the moon could cost 90 percent less than expected, bringing estimated costs down from $100 billion to $10 billion. That’s something that NASA could afford on its current deep space human spaceflight budget. […] “A factor of ten reduction in cost changes everything,” said Mark Hopkins, executive committee chair of the National Space Society, in a press release. […] The study, released today, was conducted by the National Space Society and the Space Frontier Foundation — two non-profit organizations that advocate building human settlements beyond Earth — and it was reviewed by an independent team of former NASA executives, astronauts, and space policy experts.

To dramatically reduce costs, NASA would have to take advantage of private and international partnerships — perhaps one of which would be the European Space Agency, whose director recently announced that he wants to build a town on the moon. The new estimates also assume that Boeing and SpaceX, NASA’s commercial crew partners, will be involved and competing for contracts. SpaceX famously spent just $443 million developing its Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon crew capsule, where NASA would have spent $4 billion. The authors of the new report are hoping that 89 percent discount will extend beyond low Earth orbit as well.

The most interesting reasons for wanting to do this stuff are politically edgy in the extreme, and if the whole process gets started, no one involved will want to discuss them. The helpful approach is to treat them as unmentionable in advance. Best to concentrate on the techno-economic practicalities, until the lunar neocameral splinter Human extraterrestrial foothold is safely in place.

ADDED: Plus one of these, please.

July 22, 2015admin 25 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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Chaos Patch (#71)

(Open thread + links)

Thinking through Exit (remember this). NIO thinks it’s been a little too quiet around here recently (recalling). The resilience of politics (plus, and double-plus). Burnham the prophet. Errors of altruism, and tolerance (plus). Lessons of reality TV. Ideological security (also). Spreading deviancy. Propaganda. Georgist epistemology. New blog of the week (make that two). Regular staples, Friday frags and the weeklyround.

President Sanders? (At last!) Enter the Trump popcorn wagon (more, and more, and more). Progressive Gothic (comprehended). A name that will live in infamy. A brief history of left libertarianism. Greekshit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, it’s endless). America‘s Greece. The China crash.

A climate of unreality (plus 1, 2, 3).

“It makes a big difference where your immigrants come from.” Taleb and tribalism. Chinese privilege. Reddit is the worst (unless maybe for these folks). Questioning WN. The Left’s Nordic dream. Does racism exist? Racist computers. Taylor on Raspail.

The prospect of a neo-eugenic arms race. What inbreeding doesn’t mean. Race on the brain.

Lenin on Malthusianism. Philip on Malthus. The trouble with Social Darwinism. Some Druidic conclusions from Darwin. Constructor Theory. Death.

Luther and the origins of Modernity. A leftist homage to the Puritans. Yes, the Pope is a communist (and everyone knows it). An improbable path to Christendom.

On transhumanism (with the Nietzsche cut out).

Musk.

Collective scams. Bent science.

Congratulations, you won. No one will help you.”

Futurisms. Political theory from the future (via). OIW on Anathem.

Zora Neale Hurston on Zombies.

Tests and diversions: text-based personality analyzer, political geometry, Reform insolence. (Relevant.)

July 19, 2015admin 31 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos
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