Posts Tagged ‘Science’

Quote note (#348)

Retrieved from four years ago (by XS’s favorite HBD-blogger), and still perfect in its outrageous realism:

Daniel Freedman was a professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. For his doctoral thesis, he did adoption studies with dogs. He had noticed that different dog breeds had different personalities, and thought it would be interesting to see if personality was inborn, or if it was somehow caused by the way in which the mother raised her puppies. Totally inborn. Little beagles were irrepressibly friendly. Shetland sheepdogs were most sensitive to a loud voice or the slightest punishment. Wire-haired terriers were so tough and aggressive that Dan had to wear gloves when playing with puppies that were only three weeks old. Basenjis were aloof and independent.

He decided to try the same thing with human infants of different breeds. Excuse me, different races. …

You’ll never guess what happens next (although, actually, the readers here are almost certain to).

The dog-breed analogy is used quite often, but probably still not enough. It’s pitched at the correct cladistic level, obviously. In addition, since ‘labrador supremacism’ sounds immediately ridiculous it should contribute to chipping a little stupidity from the race discussion.

April 4, 2017admin 26 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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Quote note (#305)

Vindicating Lombroso:

We study, for the first time, automated inference on criminality based solely on still face images. Via supervised machine learning, we build four classifiers (logistic regression, KNN, SVM, CNN) using facial images of 1856 real persons controlled for race, gender, age and facial expressions, nearly half of whom were convicted criminals, for discriminating between criminals and non-criminals. All four classifiers perform consistently well and produce evidence for the validity of automated face-induced inference on criminality, despite the historical controversy surrounding the topic …

November 19, 2016admin 16 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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Quote note (#304)

If given the slightest opportunity, the monkeys will ruin everything:

From the Restoration in 1660, to the end of World War II, the Royal society enforced the scientific method. If you wanted respect and esteem as a scientist, you had to tell us new and interesting things, and you had to show everyone how you knew these new and interesting things from what you saw with your eyes and touched with your hands. […] After World War II, Harvard got the upper hand over the Royal Society, and you no longer have to show your work. Instead, your work must be approved by the most holy synod of mother church – in other words, must pass peer review behind closed doors. Peer Review is new. Attempts to root it in the past of science before World War II are artificial and contrived. Somehow we obtained almost all of science that matters before we had peer review, and since we have had peer review, things have started to go terribly wrong with science. Peer Review is science by social consensus, and Galileo told us that that does not work.

November 18, 2016admin 38 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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Moron bites (#15)

Decolonize your mind.

October 15, 2016admin 79 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Lunatics
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Sentences (#74)

Whatever else time travel may entail, it does not involve changing the past.

— Larry Dwyer (cited here).

September 30, 2016admin 23 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Templexity
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Net-Driven Collapse

Psychology is the canary in the Cathedral.

September 23, 2016admin 31 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Collapse
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Quote note (#280)

Bacteria are often invoked as agents of ‘rhizomatic’ (horizontal) disruption of tree-like genetic lineages, so it’s intriguing to see them being proposed (p. 161-2) as cladistic engineers:

If two groups of the same insect ignore each other and only mate with their social circles, they should eventually split into distinct species. These splits occur all the time in nature, and the forces that cause them can take many forms. They could be physical obstacles like mountains or rivers. They could be differences in timing, in the hours or season in which animals are active. They could be incompatible genes that prevent two animals from interbreeding. Anything that stops animals from mating, or that kills or weakens the offspring of those couplings, can create ‘reproductive isolation’ — a gulf that drives species apart. And as [Eugene] Rosenberg had shown, bacteria can cause reproductive isolation, too. By acting as a living barrier that stops two populations from meeting up, microbes could potentially drive the origin of new species. …

September 4, 2016admin 76 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Speciation
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Twitter cuts (#76)


Continue Reading

August 11, 2016admin 27 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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Quote note (#267)

Back to basics:

Are there countries with low average scores that tear up the technological track? Mostly not – generally, fairly high average IQ seems to be a prerequisite for creativity in science and mathematics. Necessary, although not sufficient: bad choices (Communism), having the world kick you in the crotch (Mongols), or toxic intellectual fads can all make smart peoples unproductive. […] The exceptions, such as they are, seem to be a result of strong population substructure. India has a low average IQ, but there are distinct subpopulations (castes) that apparently have much higher IQ – although I’d love to see some decent studies on this. With numbers. …

(Via (via))

July 11, 2016admin 14 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations
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Fish People

Since the opportunities for XS to agree (in advance) with PZ Myers don’t come along too regularly, it’s worth seizing upon those that do. For anyone who thinks cladistics are important, this point is worth strongly defending:

There are multiple meanings of “fish”. We can use it to refer to specific species or an extant category of animals: salmon are fish, halibut are fish, herring are fish. No one objects to that, and they all understand that if I said “humans are still salmon”, that would be wrong. […] But another way the term is used is as a descriptor for a clade. A taxonomic clade is a “grouping that includes a common ancestor and all the descendants (living and extinct) of that ancestor”. […] So, for instance, humans belong to the mammalian clade, which includes mice and cats and cows. If we have transhuman, part-cyborg descendants, they will still be mammals, because, note, by definition a clade must include all the descendants of an ancestor. We’re trapped! There’s no way our progeny can exit the clade!

In fact, it’s such a sound point, it’s worth generalizing.

July 6, 2016admin 17 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Realism
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