The Islamic Vortex (Note-7)

Robin Wright (in The New Yorker) expresses the frustrations of a modern Jacobin about as straightforwardly as one could hope:

What seems to have been lost in the past five years is American strategic support for the Arab Spring’s aspirations — and for the innumerable other Bouazizis still struggling for rights and justice and jobs. One of Obama’s boldest decisions, in 2011, was to abandon longstanding U.S. support for Arab despots, personified in President Hosni Mubarak, who ruled Egypt ruthlessly for thirty years. For the first time, Washington opted for the unknowns of potential democracy over the guarantees of autocratic stability in the Arab world.

A speaker for HRW is even clearer about the ideological lineage at stake (and it isn’t anything coming out of the Middle East):

Each local crisis has been complicated by regional players who have intervened to block a new Arab order. “It’s no longer about what Egyptians want. Or what the Syrian people want,” Whitson, of Human Rights Watch, explained. “It’s so much broader and wider — and more complicated than during the French Revolution. Now a revolutionary doesn’t just fight the bureaucrats in the capital but bureaucrats thousands of miles away. There are so many horses in the game who have the resources and power to dictate or sway the outcome. It’s a much more difficult battle.” […] Speaking of the idealistic protesters of five years ago, Whitson said, “Sometimes it makes you wonder if they ever had a chance.” Yet she remains sanguine about the future. “The fight is not over,” she told me. “Because it can’t be over. The aspirations that inspired the spark over a seven-dollar bribe are universal, and we know it. As long as governments deny people basic justice and dignity, people will rise up.”

Yes, “rise up” [*facepalm*]. If there’s any distinction at all between (subjective) ‘caring’ and (objective) raw evil it’s getting ever harder to discern. The bleeding-out of universalistic Cathedral evangelism in the Middle East has been an event of far greater consequence than anyone is yet able to acknowledge.

December 17, 2015admin 16 Comments »
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16 Responses to this entry

  • Bettega Says:

    “The bleeding-out of universalistic Cathedral evangelism in the Middle East has been an event of far greater consequence than anyone is yet able to acknowledge.”

    No one will ever acknowledge that. People still don’t acknowledge that the same universalistic Cathedral evangelism was responsible for the defeat of Chiang kai-shek and the fall of China to Maoism. Who is going to remember Edgar Snow, Owen Lattimore, Brooks Atkinson or Agnes Smedley these days?

    The cool thing about being a progressive is that you can ruin other countries and when things go bad, you either double down or pretend you aren’t responsible. I mean, you don’t see Noam Chomsky or Tariq Ali speaking about Venezuela now.

    [Reply]

    Thales Reply:

    Being a leftist means never having to say you’re sorry.

    [Reply]

    frank Reply:

    > The cool thing about being a progressive is that you can ruin other countries and when things go bad, you either double down or pretend you aren’t responsible. I mean, you don’t see Noam Chomsky or Tariq Ali speaking about Venezuela now.

    Comments like this remind me why I came to the conclusion that Pinochet did nothing wrong.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    “Progressive intellectual gives bad advice” > “blames non-progressive government when progressive prescriptions lead to social/economic catastrophe”

    is a special case of

    “Academic non-policymaker with no skin in the game prescribes policy X” > “blames policymakers with skin in the game when policy X fails”

    Why would Chomskyactually participate in policy formation when he can get all of the credit and none of the blame?

    Reward structure of international relations academia is pozzed.

    [Reply]

    pyrrhus Reply:

    “Comments like this remind me why I came to the conclusion that Pinochet did nothing wrong.”

    Is someone outside the Cathedral claiming that Pinochet did something wrong????

    [Reply]

    Bettega Reply:

    Pinochet, and other Latin American military dictators, didn’t do enough to purge the universities of leftists. The result is that even though they didn’t had political and economical power, they still had intellectual and cultural hegemony, so when the dictatorships ended they just moved in and benefitted from the economic and political stability left by the juntas.

    John Hannon Reply:

    Anyone who was on Maggie Thatcher’s Christmas card list can’t have been all bad.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 17th, 2015 at 12:21 pm Reply | Quote
  • vxxc2014 Says:

    They’ll say they’re sorry with guns at their heads and nothing less.

    Really they’re just criminals who went to college. That’s all.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 17th, 2015 at 2:37 pm Reply | Quote
  • Jefferson Says:

    The spread of cathedralism to the Arab world mirrors the spread to pedos domestically, and is almost certainly a byproduct of the internet’s acceleration of the ratchet. Is there any group less deserving of the extention of Christian kindness than the Arab street that wants to rape the west to death? I wonder if European legs of the cathedral, having more of an existential threat from Islam, prioritizes them as a target for holiness over explicitly sexual monsters (I guess they cover both bases there, eh Rotherdam?).

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 17th, 2015 at 2:52 pm Reply | Quote
  • The Islamic Vortex (Note-7) | Reaction Times Says:

    […] Source: Outside In […]

    Posted on December 17th, 2015 at 3:17 pm Reply | Quote
  • jack arcalon Says:

    The 21st Century so far has been the most expensive experiment of all time.
    The project to make Arabs ‘behave’ has been about as successful as the search for N-Rays, frictionless perpetual motion, cold or hot fusion, or the fight against obesity.

    This experiment will end with a new bunch of Putin-esque strongmen across the Middle East, or a mushroom cloud over New York City.
    That would turn it into a theological experiment.

    [Reply]

    frank Reply:

    I wonder if a terrorist WMD attack would manage to put West into righteous rage mode, or if we would just double down on lunacy.

    [Reply]

    Redpillion Reply:

    They will double-down. No one in power ever actually is won over by an argument. It will require, at best, an election, or series of elections. Or probably something worse. There will have to be a “Berlin, 1945” moment for things to reverse course.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    That’s not an and/or proposition. As we see in Germany, the average citizen expresses righteous fury as they are dispossessed, while the elites crack open a whole new jar of blue pills.

    [Reply]

    Grotesque Body Reply:

    Derp – rather it is an AND proposition, not a pair of mutually exclusive propositions. Blame tiredness and lack of caffeine

    Posted on December 17th, 2015 at 3:31 pm Reply | Quote
  • Lesser Bull Says:

    It almost makes me feel sorry for the Arabs.

    [Reply]

    Posted on December 19th, 2015 at 8:10 pm Reply | Quote

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