The Wasteland

VDH: “[Obama’s] tenure will be known as the Wilderness Years — nothing gained, much lost.”

The diagnosis is highly persuasive, as far as it goes. The trouble with these PJMedia types, however, is that they still seem to think this is some kind of rough patch we are going through.

(Notably, though, there are definite signs that PJM’s Michael Walsh might be getting off the boat: “We used to think that changing Congress meant changing which party controlled it. Now we know better. Real change can’t begin until the Permanent Bipartisan Fusion Party is gone.”)

November 12, 2013admin 11 Comments »
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11 Responses to this entry

  • pseudo-chrysostom Says:

    cant have functional democracy without ensuring decisions are settled before they get to the democratic parts. certainly we have many examples of less functional (or non-starting) democracies outside the west, which lack the same apparatuses for manufacturing consent. to get change then, means changing the informers.

    [Reply]

    Posted on November 12th, 2013 at 6:56 pm Reply | Quote
  • VXXC Says:

    Unless you go all in with Machiavellian analysis of our government the conditioning that we are still a Constitutional Republic and democracy is very hard to break. This is our religion, it binds us together.

    For instance reading Moldbug greedily – all of it. Especially the Open Letters [OL series].

    Has he yet had his equal?

    And better would be brevity.

    Radish smashes well, but the racial angle is going to turn so many away. That’s not criticism, it’s what it is…

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    admin Reply:

    “And better would be brevity.” You need to get onto Twitter — it’s a medium made for agitation.

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    Konkvistador Reply:

    “Radish smashes well, but the racial angle is going to turn so many away. ”

    This is true, but I think you underestimate how many it brings in as well. On net it is a gain. Vibrant dysfunction is very hard to overlook. I take a measured approach to criticizing the hard core race crowd, for the same reason I only half agree with criticism of rightwing PUAs like Roissy.

    Whatever negative is to be said of them they fundamentally get a piece of reality that is incompatible with the teacher approved picture of reality as it exists today. This is important, without having a piece of your reality that the Progressive ideologies can’t or won’t explain, intruding (perhaps violently) into your consciousness and seeing how they systematically lie on it it, you simply will not be convinced about the meta arguments of reaction, that deal with moral progress or democracy.

    In theory something almost kosher like a hard core libertarianism or very kosher like a strong interest in the actual measurable improvements in welfare among third worlders could do it. You could perhaps just think your way through the implications of those until you hit the edges of unexplained reality, but in practice, for even most open minded thinkers, the blue pills on those issues are too sweet to spit out.

    To get people to ingest the red pill, the discomfort and side effects of which we the cured/infected shouldn’t underestimate, you need them to already have issues in their minds where the blue pill is either bitter or is sweet but they can within the framework of heretical Progressivism notice it is causing their bellyaches or cancer.

    This in practice means, if you successfully denounced and drove out “racism” or “sexism”, you will have to pick up something that is just as unacceptable to Progressivism and then you will be called a racist etc. anyway.

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    Posted on November 12th, 2013 at 7:41 pm Reply | Quote
  • Grotto Says:

    I think the recent Tea Party vs. Mainline Republican fight over Obamacare and the government shutdown have given the PJMedia/Tea Party types a glimpse of the Cathedral, and they finally see the alignment of forces arrayed against them. They finally realize the the establishment Republicans are merely the good cop in a good-cop-bad-cop routine.

    The fight has made explicit what had previously only been hinted at. The Tea Party is truly grassroots, and is not dependent on corporate donations. This is presented in the mainstream media as a terrifying prospect – populists who will not heed the moderated reason of their more sophisticated betters. Conversely, the Tea Party activists also see the revealed preference of their supposed allies, and realize that they are compromised as well.

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    Kgaard Reply:

    Grotto … This is good. I smell the same. A parallel (or at least parallel dynamic) can be seen in the mainstream media sniffing around the edges of the manosphere but not sure whether to actually publicize it (i.e. that 20/20 interview that never seems to get aired).

    But back to your specific point, one guy I watch closely is Glenn Reynolds of Instapundit. He used to be a garden-variety Republican/libertarian, but over the last couple of years has gotten much more conspiratorial in his interpretations. He links to a lot of radioactive sites. I think he’s helping to pull a lot of common-sense people the right way.

    Also, the writings of Victor Davis Hanson and Walter Russel Mead … even though they sometimes hedge their conclusions … are pretty radically reactionary in their implications, and I suspect plenty of readers are able to connect the dots. VDH’s writings about the interior of California in particular have been brutal.

    [Reply]

    Konkvistador Reply:

    “I think the recent Tea Party vs. Mainline Republican fight over Obamacare and the government shutdown have given the PJMedia/Tea Party types a glimpse of the Cathedral, and they finally see the alignment of forces arrayed against them. They finally realize the the establishment Republicans are merely the good cop in a good-cop-bad-cop routine.”

    Most Tea Partyiers will forget all about these insights come the next election cycle warms up, indeed elections with their promise of power for conservatives and pseudo-conservatives, has historically served as their mindwipe. Election cycles are when conservative obsolete Progressivism is updated to a slightly less obsolete version.

    Still I think what you said is true, and some people won’t forget the insight. But lets not forget this isn’t the first time the machinery hasn’t hid very well. It was noticed before, and this was what launched the John Birch society over 50 years ago. Nothing came of it.

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    admin Reply:

    This is the insight required, if the Tea Party is to become / remain a political vertebrate.

    [Reply]

    Posted on November 13th, 2013 at 1:45 am Reply | Quote
  • Handle Says:

    If trends persist, after a rough memory-holing of prior History, posterity will probably look back to this period as a lost Golden Age.

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    Posted on November 13th, 2013 at 1:58 am Reply | Quote
  • admin Says:

    @ Grotto, Handle — truly excellent points.

    [Reply]

    Posted on November 13th, 2013 at 2:11 am Reply | Quote
  • Grotto Says:

    @Konkvistador

    I agree, but there are signs that the Tea Party is a bit more resilient the average populist rabble.

    1. They are willing to fight for “extremist” Tea Party candidates, in the primary, against their more moderate McCain/Romney competitors, knowing full well they are fielding less competitive candidates who have a lower chance of winning. This fact is regarded in the press as bizarrely irrational. Why give up half of a sure thing for a small chance at the whole? But from the reactionary perspective, this is perfectly logical. The establishment Republican would be no better than the Democrat on core issues, and it would be better to take a shot with the Tea Party candidate, rather than back the establishment Republican, which would be tantamount to failure anyways. The fact that the Tea Party acts this way, even if it can’t fully articulate why, is encouraging.

    2. Conservatives are, by definition, loyal to their tribe. For decades, that has meant the United States of America, the American flag, and all the various symbols associated with the US Government. Allegiance and affinity with these institutions and symbols is very, very slowly beginning to drain. The Tea Party talks of “taking the country back”, which reveals a emotional distance between themselves and the country as it currently exists. As the futility of “taking the country back” is gradually made clear, they begin transferring their allegiance to other cultural signifiers. For example, the Gadsden flag, which now outnumbers the US flag at most Tea Party rallies.

    Of course, it is also entirely possible that the Cathedral propaganda machine will be simply too strong.

    [Reply]

    Posted on November 14th, 2013 at 10:42 pm Reply | Quote

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