The Way of the Worm

Here‘s the link to a recent short ‘essay’ of mine on philosophy and war, written for an intriguing art project, themed by the Stuxnet worm. The PDF also includes a piece by John Menick and an interview with David Harley. (I haven’t had time to properly digest the whole thing yet — but it looks extremely interesting.) Lars Holdhus, who initiated the project, has generously given me permission to share it.

November 27, 2013admin 18 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Contagion , Cosmos , Philosophy

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18 Responses to this entry

  • Diogenes Says:

    Foucault used to invert the standard realist dictum “war is politics by other means” to instead assert that “politics is war by other means.”

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Both formulations provide a lot to mull over.

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    Psykonomist Reply:

    “Politics is war by other means” is a pretty standard ancap position.

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    Posted on November 27th, 2013 at 7:02 am Reply | Quote
  • Alex Says:

    And Horror the soul of the plot.

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    admin Reply:

    Always.

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    Posted on November 27th, 2013 at 6:51 pm Reply | Quote
  • VXXC Says:

    Have you thought about actual violent war in the physical realm along the lines of viral, stimergic learing ..ala what John Robb used to talk about?

    Because the new paradigms have been employed somewhat unthinkingly by people trapped in Islamist ideological strictures restricting free thought. Even Abu Musab Al-Suri [The Syrian] isn’t that free thinking. He’s mainly interested [in the English Translation I read] in Islamic purity and avoiding the excesses of the past. He’s not looking at the new paradigm which seems to have sprung up due to technology; networked organizations. If they’re thinking about it they’re not writing about it. It’s mostly ideology and religion and jihad they write about.

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    admin Reply:

    Perhaps the most vector for the ‘libertarians mugged by reality’ current of NR points down through the topic of market coordination into the study of war. Moldbug already anticipates this (in embryo). Your questions about cultural facilitation / inhibition of military intelligence (in the extreme sense) are clearly crucial to this. (Yes, I too would be surprised if Islam was ultimately a positive factor in respect to military competence.)

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    Artemisia Reply:

    Islam won’t be a positive factor in respect to military competence, but given how twisted militant Islam can get, I’d expect (well, not really expect, but not be surprised by) two things. The first is that religious evidence would be twisted in favour of escalating “military competence” and technology (and, when it comes to “networked organizations”, I don’t think anyone does this better than militant Islamists). The second is related to escalation too – Islam is, because taken literally, an apocalyptic religion. And it doesn’t sound like anything sinister (yeah, every holy book talks about judgement day, right?) until one starts to realise that a lot of even non-militant, sane, educated, ordinary Muslims believe that the world is ending soon and that they have to watch out for “the signs”. Those who don’t believe this simply haven’t thought about it (I mean – “it’s written! It’s there in The Book” – Muslims’ greatest validity evidence). And so, if Muslims would have (if ideologically manipulated as they seem to be always) less problems with escalation for the sake of escalation and war for the sake of war. Western civilisations (whatever that means, I don’t attach much value to the term – it’s just a post-Cold-War sticker I, the Arab Russian tag on the Other that is in the geographical west) are far too utilitarian to accept making technology an end. Clausewitzian war might have no end, but the technological war machine of the West will have an end, and this end won’t be itself. It could swtich ends, obviously – but it just could be more likely that some, even less technologically advanced, machine would make itself its end if the end it had before this “twist” was essentially destructive. Militant Islam is pretty destructive to me, and with how much money the Saudis have, and how willing they are to fund militant Islamists – you just never know when these guys will have enough technology. Fun, no?

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    Posted on November 28th, 2013 at 1:04 am Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    Nick, Mark Fisher (who’s currently my second supervisor at the mo), has written an article that has got the left fighting like cats in a pillow case. Thought you might find it (and the overwhelming number of responses) interesting.

    http://www.thenorthstar.info/?p=11299

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    admin Reply:

    Thanks — that’s already been passed around the twitterverse to some considerable amusement. (I enjoyed it a lot.) Exploding-head responses will add a new wave of fun.

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    Posted on November 28th, 2013 at 10:05 pm Reply | Quote
  • Mark Warburton Says:

    P.S. And I don’t just mean the responses in the comment section. A quick google search of the article will unearth full blown hysteria coming from all factions.

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    fotrkd Reply:

    Mark,

    Would you fancy asking Mark Fisher about the difference between guilt and shame? It’s never been clear to me.

    Guilt dominates ‘Exiting the Vampire Castle’, for instance:

    Brand makes people feel good about themselves; whereas the moralising left specialises in making people feed bad, and is not happy until their heads are bent in guilt and self-loathing.

    But apparently shame is an emotion we should universally share (as revealed in this snippet written shortly before Vampire Castle):

    Just to be clear – what troubles me about people who went to private school or Oxbridge on the left is not that they went there – in spite of everything, against all the odds, many talented people have been there – but when they NEVER mention in public that they enjoyed those privileges – and worse when they think they can speak unproblematically from the position of the oppressed […] Everyone who went to Oxbridge or private school should be honest about it and be ashamed of it – not guilty but ashamed. Ashamed of the advantages they attained at the expense of others. I’m ashamed of the advantages I received compared to other members of my family never mind the wider class. We should speak honestly about this but then move on.

    For slightly more life-affirming Bolshevikism, I did enjoy this Halloween talk (complete with rare, self-deprecating humour).

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    Mark Warburton Reply:

    Ha – how to broach the subject! I’m seeing him with my main supervisor on the 16th of December. A meeting that could be pivotal as to whether I continue at Goldsmiths or not. So I’ll probably leave pointed question for the time being. 🙂

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    Posted on November 28th, 2013 at 10:08 pm Reply | Quote
  • exvatika Says:

    @

    Mark, why consider leaving goldsmiths now when things are just getting interesting. 😉

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    Posted on December 9th, 2013 at 9:59 pm Reply | Quote
  • exvatika Says:

    You may find particular resonance with Paul Mann’s text ‘Nine Grounds of Intellectual Warfare’ http://pmc.iath.virginia.edu/text-only/issue.196/mann.196 (courtesy of |end| & I)

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    admin Reply:

    Thanks.

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    Mark Warburton Reply:

    ‘Exvatika’, I hope you become a feature here. We’re gathering a little GS clique. 😉

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    Posted on December 10th, 2013 at 1:20 am Reply | Quote
  • Outside in - Involvements with reality » Blog Archive » Gigadeath War Says:

    […] (Some topic preemption at Outside in here.) […]

    Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 11:12 am Reply | Quote

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