Twitter cuts (#127)

This is true, and worth more thought than it’s received so far.

April 8, 2017admin 42 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Media

TAGGED WITH : , , ,

42 Responses to this entry

  • σ Says:

    WW-n

    [Reply]

    SilverSpeed Reply:

    LOL.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 8th, 2017 at 8:11 pm Reply | Quote
  • Cryptogenic Says:

    Nevertheless, I’m investing in Raytheon stock.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    » In 2010 Raytheon developed an “extreme-scale analytics” system named Rapid Information Overlay Technology (RIOT), which allows the user to track people’s movements and even predict their behaviour by mining data from social networking sites including Facebook, Twitter, Gowalla, and Foursquare. Raytheon claims that it has not sold this software to any clients, but has shared it with US government and industry.[42] A company spokesperson told PC magazine in 2013 that “Raytheon, as a leader in cybersecurity, offers advanced capabilities to government customers. We’re focused on providing them the best available solutions that meet their constantly evolving requirements.”[43] »

    [Reply]

    vxxc2014 Reply:

    U WINZ DIS THREAD

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 8th, 2017 at 8:41 pm Reply | Quote
  • Anonymous Says:

    Huge psyops potential. Obviously fake but realistic pictures of people doing all kinds of shocking things are also an interesting possibility.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 8th, 2017 at 9:39 pm Reply | Quote
  • execrablefrippery Says:

    Plus ça change … : “Images are not arguments, rarely even lead to proof, but the [human] mind craves them, and, of late more than ever, the keenest experimenters find twenty images better than one, especially if contradictory.”—Henry Adams, “A Law of Acceleration” (1904). The contradiction of “beautiful babies … cruelly murdered” must be a pretty robust & satisfying noncognitive experience. That of the administration’s “nose-dive back into neoconservative meddling” certainly is.

    [Reply]

    Kwisatz Haderach Reply:

    That’s an astonishing find! Thanks for the link.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 9th, 2017 at 3:05 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    » Axiomata a particularibus rite et ordine ahstracta nova particularia rursus facile
    indicant et designant, itaque scientias reddunt activas. »— Bacon, ‘Novum Organon’, i. 24.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    » in education uncertainty is worse than ignorance »

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    if education is about knowledge, then there is 3 type of uncertainties related to knowledge: Incompleteness, Incoordination and Impermanence. there maybe more, but non of it related to ignorance, unless in broad psychiatric sense we will definie ignorance as inability to comprehend anything.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 9th, 2017 at 8:48 am Reply | Quote
  • SVErshov Says:

    future wars will be about resources, if energy can be renewed, REE (rare earth elements) cannot be renewed and it is just as names say RARE.

    I dont know about future of neural networks, but at present they already hit their limit. kind of very seriouse and bad limit ‘speed of light’ in optic fiber. if your neural network in Singapore you will be in disadvantage with those in NY. if you try to do HFT in NY. once you touch it, it never gonna be enough of neural networks, process self replicating and metamorphic. so far only limit for ‘this’ is in REE. nothing will cost more in future then REE.

    [Reply]

    Orthodox Reply:

    Most REE aren’t rare in the sense of being scarce. They are rare because you need to move a lot of Earth to obtain a small amount. That’s less of a problem moving forward and if prices rise. Just as processing gold from seawater would raise Earth’s reserves many times over.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 9th, 2017 at 1:56 pm Reply | Quote
  • SilverSpeed Says:

    Yes, that’s the risk.

    Trump’s limbic system went ‘babies – dead – bombs – Syrian planes – unacceptable – retaliate – fire’.

    His frontal lobes stayed asleep the whole time.

    His holding himself hostage to emotional manipulation via ‘false flags’ makes the whole world vulnerable.

    I was stunned on Friday morning, and am now more fearful of a nuclear exchange than I’ve ever been.

    [Reply]

    SVErshov Reply:

    too much of been ‘real’ president for 3 months. metamorphic president evidently.

    [Reply]

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    Yeah, fuck him. It was worth it for the mass triggering of the Left, but Kek has left the building for good.

    [Reply]

    Frank Reply:

    > Not expecting unexpectedness from the God of Chaos.
    Kek. Kek has scarcely started.

    [Reply]

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    Joke: Overestimating Trump’s nth-dimensional Dungeon Master skills.
    Woke: Underestimating Kek.

    John Hannon Reply:

    “It was worth it for the mass triggering of the Left …”

    It certainly triggered Howard Jacobson –

    https://www.penguin.co.uk/articles/features/2017/apr/howard-jacobson-on-pussy/

    The comedy isn’t so much in his satire as in the hysteria of his impotent rage.
    When Peter Cook opened The Establishment club and was asked what sort of entertainment people could expect, he said he would take inspiration from the satirical Berlin cabarets of the 30s that had “done so much to stop the rise of Adolf Hitler and prevent the Second World War.”

    [Reply]

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    The summer scarf says it all.

    Bruce Arney Reply:

    The memes were intentionally planted in Trumps mind much like the same memes were planted in the mind of cokehead George W. Bush. History is merely repeating itself in a different reality show format. When people started watching total eclipses of the moon on TV rather than stepping outside to see the real deal, humanity began to circle the drain. It will accelerate as the turd circles the toilet.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 9th, 2017 at 3:18 pm Reply | Quote
  • pyrrhus Says:

    ‘Wag the Dog’ captured this reality very well….

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    War-advertisement circuit.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Check out the Coke ads at the beginning, they show as it were Nordic japs. (I.e. narrow head, relat. non-sloped forehead, nose not flat or bungled).

    Gee, I wonder why Coca Cola Company would choose such morphic features to appeal to orientals. Of course, such things were rather often seen in the glory of our times—the 80s, who had gotten over the fuzzy niggardly 60s and 70s.

    It’s quite funny that it was Hollywood itself which somewhat carried the mantle of classic beauty even though it was for the Nazis one of their main ideals. The universal preference for Nordic morphology is seen in relatively ‘Nordic’ looking Afro actors like Denzel Washington, and some of Hollywoods most ‘serious’ actors such as Daniel Day-Lewis, Christian Bale and (now more rarely seen for being too ‘serious’) Edward Norton. It’s interesting how swollen the previously somewhat leptomorphic actor Marlon Brando became through aging, but that’s in race too, our genetics, how we change with aging or how we respond to diet and environment. Not that becoming swollen with aging isn’t common but that how incredibly swollen he became. He looks kind of like Bannon in his last photos. The fashion industry and the advertising industry, utilising this non-swollen look for profit has been fuel for many a conspiracy theorist about a New(Old) Nazi International or a 4th Reich (running the world). Personally, I can’t stand Scarlet Johannson’s nose, but I love ‘Lost In Translation’.

    [Reply]

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    I take it you’ve never been to Japan. A higher nasal bone and thinner septal cartilage is a common feature of their phenotype.

    I think what you mean is, “White beauty standards persist.” Like, duh.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Roundeaded whites are White too. White refers to a type of skin, most saliently known for its pigmentation, so, no » White beauty standards persist. » rather makes what I was saying less detailed and more populist. Unless you’re maintaining some para-Victorian gobble about only the English being White, which would hardly worry me as the Normans who conquered England included Icelanders.

    » The Norman [‘north-man’] conquest of England in 1066 led to the transfer of the English capital city and chief royal residence from the Anglo-Saxon one at Winchester to Westminster, and the City of London quickly established itself as England’s largest and principal commercial centre. »

    Cryptogenic, we’re not of the same caste. You’re a manual labourer and pill prescriber, and I am a brahmin. For sanity — sanitarium — to return to the world my caste has to re-subjugate the upstart plebes. No need to make it harder than it needs to be, it’s inevitable anyway. It’s been foretold globally. You can fawn at me with “duh”s like a teenager all you want, it only tickles my eros.

    I’m not some genocidal maniac, as I value human bio- & regime diversity. ‘Nordic’ refers to morphology in this sense, not to pigmentation or depigmented mongolomorph Whites (like Björk) in Iceland and Scandinavia.

    Incidentally I met a Japanese girl once when I was working on a farm close to one Björk had stayed on as a kid, in the same county as my family estate. We became friends, she thought it was funny I was into some Japanese pop music and was surprised and impressed by my pronunciation when I asked if she knew Hamasaki Ayumi. I simply have a natural talent for pronunciation like a brahmin should.

    Raymond Reply:

    You Know, it’s funny, usually old-money, natural aristocrat types are supposed to be comfortable enough in their position that they don’t have to bring up the fact that they’re an upper caste all the time. Kind of makes you wonder, doesn’t it, G.?

    Cryptogenic Reply:

    I await the uprising with serious concern, you may be sure.

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    I don’t expect it for quite some decades.

    Posted on April 10th, 2017 at 1:25 am Reply | Quote
  • Wagner Says:

    https://twitter.com/Outsideness/status/850908498036531200

    Land is starting to sense the Deep State is deeper than he thought so he’s trying to cover his tracks. “It was all a joke! I’m a LARPer!” he screams as his face is d0wsed with waterboard water. “I’m an Accelerationist!” he shrieks like a cat as his face is covered again and he helplessly splutters..

    The truth of the matter is that in order to be an Accelerationist you have to not only *play* the role but *be* the role. So I’ll see you in the gulag, Lando. Hopefully you’ll have a smile on your face, I know I will.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 10th, 2017 at 3:01 am Reply | Quote
  • GC Says:

    I’m still waiting to see the photos of the dead people in Sweden. I doubt that’s going to happen, though.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 10th, 2017 at 6:28 am Reply | Quote
  • GoingPro Says:

    The Syrian air base was empty. It’s consolidation of power on behalf of all executive parties. Not even “no harm, no foul”, but solid play by executive parties. It’s playing in bounds.
    Credit due to the acceptance of the wag.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 10th, 2017 at 12:00 pm Reply | Quote
  • Uriel Fiori Says:

    it’s getting harder and harder to get a war these days…

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 10th, 2017 at 2:05 pm Reply | Quote
  • Bruce Arney Says:

    @

    No doubt the images which are to be proven to be highly effective in getting us into another Middle East war are being tested on soldiers, civilians and church/synagogue leaders. now. The winner to be announced with a huge bang!

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 10th, 2017 at 5:12 pm Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    » Jon Amiel’s Copycat (1995) opens with renowned criminal psychologist Dr. Helen Hudson (Sigourney Weaver) giving her stock lecture on serial killers in which she explains that serial killers murder for recognition and power, usually over women, who constitute the majority of victims. With each killing leaving them unfulfilled, they kill again driven by the hope that next time might be perfect. To highlight the group that poses most risk, Helen asks all male members of the audience to stand, and then invites those under 20 or over 35 and those of Asian and African American descent to sit down, an exercise designed to highlight that 90% of serial killers are young adult, white males. Adding that most women in the audience would probably date the men still standing, she notes that the majority of serial killers appear to be totally “normal” on the surface.

    What interests me about this scene is not only the unusual highlighting of the whiteness and maleness of serial killing, but also the suggestion that there is something about white masculinity that makes it fertile terrain for the spawning of such horrendous crimes. Helen implicitly links the apparent “normality” of the serial killer with the invisibility afforded by white masculinity. At the same time, she suggests that this very anonymity is intrinsic to the pathology, since serial killers kill precisely to gain recognition. In other words, undergridding her lecture is the suggestion that white masculinity is a rather empty, depleted identity, which, in the serial killer, produces a chain of violent acts intent on attaining a form of subjectivity that remains ever elusive.

    Copycat is one of the many serial killer films released in the 90s in the wake of the Oscar-winning success of The Silence of the Lambs (1991), which gave a genre with its roots in the slasher cycle a newfound respectability. The popularity of the genre was immediately seized upon by the U.S. popular media and packaged up in fin-de-millennium anxieties about the state of the nation, while neo-conservatives used the opportunity to scapegoat reel for real violence. These sensationalized accounts not only eclipsed any discussion of the violence of U.S. domestic and foreign policies during the same period,[1] but they also sidelined the gendered and raced nature of serial killing. As Richard Dyer notes, Helen’s assertion that “nine out of ten” serial killers are white males follows official statistics, and those who dispute this figure

    “only manage to demonstrate small increases in percentages of women and non-white serial killers” (‘Seven’ 38). »

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 11th, 2017 at 6:15 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    Raymond, this is certainly a meme I’ve seen forwarded often. Ultimately it’s a plebeian defense mechanism, in the case that someone is an aristocrat and they’re reacting to that — “because you don’t [match some popular, very plebeian conception of what an aristocrat is supposed to be, monocled smoking a pipe]” — but otherwise it may be a legitimate concern and expose a fraud.

    I’m mentioning these things because they are true. People hardly believe things like these exist anymore. They’re not even taugth what they actually mean if they study them in academia. It’s all been academized. Baron Giulio Cesare Andrea Evola quit school right before graduation in protest against this deadened culture. This superficial culture of books-rather-than-being. Not a social protest, but rather a private protest in the sense of ‘expressing of dissent from’. Believe me, I’ve been in volved in the culture around right-wing brahminity since I was a teenager and there’s a lot of bookish dorks who just ape the concepts from Evola &c. They’d actually benefit from reading Evola through Baudrillard and Lacan, altho it wasn’t necessary for me (yet is augmenting my understanding of E). If you match Evola’s typology or not doesn’t come down to opinion, but translatability and geometry. If you can’t explain Evola to a five year old, you never got Evola. If you don’t have the bone or physical geometry of the type he describes, too bad for you. If you’re chubby and not slender, dream on.

    Firstly, these are rather atraditional times, which is exactly what aristocratic tradition both east and west has said they’d be. Secondly, most people don’t agree on what is aristocratic by now. Not even those descended from the famous lineages seem to know anymore, so far as seen in popular media.

    I get that you’re insinuating that I’m bringing up my casteness all the time. That isn’t simply true; an obvious hyperbole. Hyperboles tend to be used as defense mechanisms, “you can’t be that, you wouldn’t’ mention it if you were.”

    I’ve seen such reactions from people. Like, you mention something twice and they hyperbole “Hey buddy! No need to bring it up all the time!”. Uh, ok. Cryptogenic could even get that as a doctor, from someone who is annoyed by doctors. People do this with anything really. What seems untrustworthy or doesn’t fit your world-image, becomes hypersalient to you.

    Of course, there’s also the case of the wannabe who freuqently claims to be of insinuates he is something he isn’t. If it looks that way to you, you are not the ears for this mouth, because if you were not a plebe you’d judge me on my perspicacity and not such superficialities. A brahmin may not even appear to be rich or educated. You’ll have to read on the cultures of gurus of the east to get to know them, lest you have other recourse. We’re using brahmin here rather synonymously, altho I do agree with the old meaning that he should get to know the Vedas. » The Gautama Dharmasutra states in verse 10.3 that it is obligatory on a Brahmin to learn and teach the Vedas.[6] Chapter 10 of the text, according to Olivelle translation, states that he may impart Vedic instructions to a teacher, relative, friend, elder, anyone who offers exchange of knowledge he wants, or anyone who pays for such education.[6] The Chapter 10 adds that a Brahmin may also engage in agriculture, trade, lend money on interest, while Chapter 7 states that a Brahmin may engage in the occupation of a warrior in the times of adversity.[6][7] Typically, asserts Gautama Dharmasutra, a Brahmin should accept any occupation to sustain himself but avoid the occupations of a Shudra, but if his life is at stake a Brahmin may sustain himself by accepting occupations of a Shudra.[7] The text forbids a Brahmin from engaging in the trade of animals for slaughter, meat, medicines and milk products even in the times of adversity.[7]

    The Apastamba Dharmasutra asserts in verse 1.20.10 that trade is generally not sanctioned for Brahmins, but in the times of adversity he may do so.[8] »

    I wouldn’t’ say I’m ‘old money’. It isn’t perfectly synonymous with aristocracy anyway. One thing I am and that is rooted. My ancestor was a first-wave settler from Norway. 8th century. An aristocrat, in the sense of master-slave difference. If he was a slave I don’t think he would’ve made it to the books. He was no doubt a slave-holder. Everyone since this primogenitor, down to me is logged. That’s a bloodline. More recently I’m rooted on an estate of my great grandfather who was an entrepreneur. He was the first Icelander who bought from abroad a bulldozer to Iceland. Incidentally my family does have a family name, but only a minority does have such in Iceland (it became fashionable in the 18th century to take up family names as people abroad had). Eiríksson is not my family name, lest I adopt it as such. It just means that Eiríkur is the name of my father.

    » Except during a time of adversity, a Brahmin ought to sustain himself by following a livelihood that causes little or no harm to creatures. He should gather wealth just sufficient for his subsistence through irreproachable activities that are specific to him, without fatiguing his body. – 4.2–4.3

    He must never follow a worldly occupation for the sake of livelihood, but subsist by means of a pure, upright and honest livelihood proper to a Brahmin. One who seeks happiness should become supremely content and self controlled, for happiness is rooted in contentment and its opposite is the root of unhappiness. – 4.11–4.12

    — Manusmriti, Translated by Patrick Olivelle[10] »

    I’ve actually never claimed to be an ‘aristocrat’, in the sense you mean it. I wouldn’t do so except in the sense that it means I wish for the best to rule. A brahmin I use in perhaps even more classical sense than Moldbug. Certainly, I am a man of letters, but far more than that as I have non-quotidian experiences like those mostly associated with someone like Aleister Crowley, nowadays.

    I’m certainly not ‘old money’ in the usual sense it’s used, altho I’m a 4th generation inheritor of land. I’m landed gentry, in that I can live entirely from income from my inherited land. There’s a 4th generation business as well, in addition to rent seeking. If things go well I will be able to expand business. I’m interested in health, so I’m thinking about a health resort.

    But if my vocation stays mostly literary-pedagogic, that’s fine as well.

    Brahminity is mostly about aptitude for understanding spirituality. I know that word isn’t thought of as high-class anymore, but I’m too classical to get swept by such trends. Spirit is a vector, direction with movement and weight (influence). It’s a thing of influence personified. I.e. Veritas is truth as a goddess. Puritas, you’ll see what is. Justitia, famous. Libertas. Mars. Venus. These are things a brahmin understands. Just look up the pontifical college of the imperium Romanum. I.e. the priestly school (which the emperor headed). The aristocracy.

    » The title pontifex comes from the Latin for “bridge builder”, a possible allusion to a very early role in placating the gods and spirits associated with the Tiber River, for instance.[2] Also, Varro cites this position as meaning “able to do”.[3] »

    As a brahmin I can tell you this refers to bridging concepts. I.e. a societas like Rome had to have a certain common mind. There couldn’t be too much discord, and they had authorities to enforce this common mind. Differentiating schools had to be bridged, and thus there was one nexus or imperium. » The flamens were priests in charge of fifteen official cults of Roman religion, each assigned to a particular god. » » Membership in the various colleges of priests, including the College of Pontiffs, was usually an honor offered to members of politically powerful or wealthy families. Membership was for life, except for the Vestal Virgins whose term was 30 years. In the early Republic, only patricians could become priests. However, the Lex Ogulnia in 300 BC opened up college to plebeians. »

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 11th, 2017 at 7:55 am Reply | Quote
  • G. Eiríksson Says:

    Speaking of rent extraction, et cetera

    http://evonomics.com/finance-is-not-the-economy-bezemer-hudson/

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 11th, 2017 at 1:03 pm Reply | Quote
  • Pseudo-chrysostom Says:

    Its always funny to see the deluge of verbiage that reflexively pours out whenever someone gets poked in the ego.

    [Reply]

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    [Immaterial sniping.]

    [Reply]

    Pseudo-chrysostom Reply:

    The unrestrainted rhetorical [i]mano a mano[/i] of intertubes are a path of innitiation; trolls are bodhisattvas; and those who lose their chill have fallen from the way of enlightenment.

    [Reply]

    Wagner Reply:

    This is true. Keep thy chill Erikson. Cold, hyperborean, you Icelanders are supposed to be images for the kids.

    G. Eiríksson Reply:

    Cold as a glass of milk.

    Posted on April 13th, 2017 at 8:51 pm Reply | Quote

Leave a comment