Zack-Pop II

Zack politics is interesting enough to have generated concern:

Zombie apocalypse logic inevitably paints humans — the ones who survive, anyway — as selfish, dangerous, and ready to turn on one another when confronted with hardship. It’s a vicious, social Darwinist vision of a society that unravels quickly and easily; the only things apparently holding us together are police departments and electricity. […] … The basic tenets of zombie logic also track with ​hardline conservative principles (self-sufficiency, individualism, isolationism), which have been increasingly forcefully articulated over the last fifteen years. In his 2012 book, Thomas Edsall examines the work of Wharton professor Philip Tetlock, which found that conservatives “are less tolerant of compromise; see the world in ‘us’ versus ‘them’ terms; are more willing to use force to gain an advantage; are ‘more prone to rely on simple (good vs. bad) evaluative rules in interpreting policy issues’ are “motivated to punish violators of social norms (e.g., deviations from traditional norms of sexuality or responsible behavior) and to deter free riders.” Sound familiar? Pretty much describes the moral compass of successful zombie survivors. Funny, then, that Republicans actually​ tend to hate the Walking Dead. […] Regardless, the proliferation of zombie culture, at this point, is mind-boggling. How are we, as an audience, still enthralled by the same scenario, the same brain-dead villains, the same emptied wastelands? “It’s feeding back on itself,” [Daniel] Drezner said. “Every time someone says we’ve hit peak zombie, something else comes along.”

The provisional XS hypothesis: Zack-prep is the commercial-aesthetic response to the death of conservatism. The progs can’t be stopped by any political mechanism yet installed, so it’s time to stock the basement with ammo and beans. Naturally, they’re going to say: you shouldn’t be thinking like that! It’s encouraging that so many people are.

April 3, 2015admin 15 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Zombie

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15 Responses to this entry

  • Zack-Pop II | Neoreactive Says:

    […] By admin […]

    Posted on April 3rd, 2015 at 4:50 pm Reply | Quote
  • Frog Do Says:

    “That’s disconcerting to a number of critics, who argue that the worldview promoted by the zombie apocalypse is hopeless and nihilistic, and that its sweeping popularity may actually erode trust in our institutions and fellow humans.”

    I thought this was particularly funny.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Fun and games with positive feedback.

    [Reply]

    E. Antony Gray (@RiverC) Reply:

    Classic cart-horse, you can’t make this stuff up

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 3rd, 2015 at 5:06 pm Reply | Quote
  • Hattori Says:

    “Zack-prep is the commercial-aesthetic response to the death of conservatism.”

    That makes sense, I was never into the zombie aesthetic because of the brain dead villains. Compare zombies to, say, vampires, which have so much more literary potential as interesting villains.
    It’s always the survival element that draws people in. Zombie fiction is post-collapse fiction. It’s closer to The Road than to Ann Rice.

    In video games, DayZ is the most popular online zombie game because it’s focus is not on shooting up zombies but on it’s complex survival mechanics and vast environments where the real threats are other human players on the server.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 3rd, 2015 at 5:19 pm Reply | Quote
  • Izak Says:

    Wait a minute.

    “Funny, then, that Republicans actually​ tend to hate the Walking Dead.”

    Why is he taking this sentence as an inconsequential sort of irony? Shouldn’t it constitute a contradiction to what he’s saying, or at least open up a new thought?

    I guess he doesn’t need to, since I agree with the OP here. Zombie scenarios are “post-conservative,” not really conservative. They’re also tribalistic in the most generic possible way, so there’s plenty of reason that leftists, SJWs, hipsters, and SWPLs can appreciate them, since they’re tribal people, too.

    Jack Donovan has discussed this issue on his own blog.

    [Reply]

    dantealiegri Reply:

    @Izak

    You assume the writer isn’t a fool; he seems smart enough to notice the discongruence, but is not willing to take it further.

    Zombie scenarios are necessarily post-civilizational, which is then intuitively post conservative. The only question is, where is it for liberals? A thrill gone too far, or perhaps how they think things must necessarily end ( with them, the survivors, natch ) …

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    ivvenalis Reply:

    @Izak

    The latest Walking Dead plotline features the main character screaming that things are different now literally while enforcing domestic violence laws.

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    Posted on April 3rd, 2015 at 7:58 pm Reply | Quote
  • Brett Stevens Says:

    I wonder if it’s even that articulate.

    Zombie horror comes to us from the wider horror genre, which can be summarized as “people battle denial of reality to confront an unexpected adversary with mysterious powers.”

    They are simply pointing out that society is a zombie in the UNIX meaning, i.e. a process which has lost its purpose and operates independently of need.

    The realists are recognizing a need to deal with this error.

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    Posted on April 3rd, 2015 at 8:15 pm Reply | Quote
  • Alex Says:

    “… anti-capitalist zombies …”

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 3rd, 2015 at 9:27 pm Reply | Quote
  • Barnabas Says:

    Zombies fulfill a role as a dehumanized enemy to be blown away in prime time. Writers of cartoons like GI Joe figured this out in the 80s. Make the enemies robots, clones, etc. and you can mow them down by the dozens and have guts (wires) spilling out. I know that there is more going on in TWD than that but there is still a lot of that.

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    Posted on April 4th, 2015 at 1:38 am Reply | Quote
  • Amon Khan Says:

    Zombie apocalypse is the natural culmination of global neoliberalism isn’t it? Undifferentiated mobs of consumers swarming to buy the latest products, without souls, roots, culture, religion or identity, vastly outnumbering the small fraction of humanity that is still necessary for the survival of a worthwhile civilization.

    Los Angeles, New Orleans, Ferguson, Paris, London — we’ve had many previews of the coming apocalypse, yet the zombification project continues unabated. I for one will enjoy watching the university liberals trying to escape their ivory towers, while the zombies smash the windows and chant “justice!”, or “brains!” or some such mindless gibberish before finally breaking in and tearing those who created them limb from limb.

    [Reply]

    existoon Reply:

    IMO neoliberalism is more like last supper in Alien 8 on infinite repeat without climax. The facehugger has fallen off and Kane is hungry, then sick. Everyone is waiting for Alien but It never comes.

    The crew (includes Zizek and Nick Land in supporting roles) is also hungry and sick. The special effects are so rotten they seem like zombies.

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    Posted on April 4th, 2015 at 5:27 am Reply | Quote
  • vxxc2014 Says:

    It seems to get lost here sometimes that conservatives aren’t the real enemy, they just failed.
    Although others have failed far worse.

    It might do to remember that other than occasionally generating an atypical stir from an insane and dying progressive beast Neo-reaction hasn’t succeeded in anything but more blogging and tweeting, and of course some helpful analysis. So yes conservatism is largely failing in it’s positive goals – although mind you compared to the fate of Russia, China and so many others the West is a profound improvement in suffering.

    Mind you Humility is important in strife – yes, actually it is. So is remembering who the enemy is…so consider achievements humbly and remember who the enemy is – Progressives.

    [Reply]

    Posted on April 4th, 2015 at 4:52 pm Reply | Quote
  • SydneyTrads Editors Says:

    In his 2012 book, Thomas Edsall examines the work of Wharton professor Philip Tetlock, which found that conservatives “are less tolerant of compromise; see the world in ‘us’ versus ‘them’ terms; are more willing to use force to gain an advantage; are ‘more prone to rely on simple (good vs. bad) evaluative rules in interpreting policy issues’ are “motivated to punish violators of social norms (e.g., deviations from [in group favored/endorsed] norms of sexuality or responsible behavior) and to deter [dissent].” Sound familiar?

    Yes. Sounds like the progressive establishment left in all of its cultural and political manifestations.

    [Reply]

    Posted on May 4th, 2015 at 8:13 am Reply | Quote

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