Posts Tagged ‘AI’

Ex Machina

Half way through, and there’s already more than enough for an enthusiastic recommendation. (The utterly despicable Her already left twitching in the dust.)

ExMach00

Will report back upon completion.

(This trailer is a cultural treasure for the quotes alone.)

May 16, 2015admin 42 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Review
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Chaos Patch (#54)

(Open thread + links)

Sovereignty and legitimacy (NIO’s Schmittian meditations continue). Neoreaction and nihilism. A necessary absurdity. Semantic communion. Selective warfare. Leftists of the right, and corporate leftism. Sustainable virtue. Questioning the Puritan thesis, and nationalism. Colonialism‘s bad rap. SRx stuff. The epistemic damage of distrust (and trust). On soft revolution. Diversity and social capital destruction. Yuray and Brinker on the Anissimov book. Fragged Fiday. Secession trawl (related). New blog (and also … this). Weekly round-ups.

Indubitably: “The truth is that the Dollar is strong this time around not because the U.S. economy is booming but because Europe and Japan (the [largest components] of the Dollar Index) are intent on crashing their currencies” (via), and more (on the “deflationary tide”).

“America’s Middle East strategy is what exactly?”

Alexander reviews The Machinery of Freedom.

The Razib Khan affair (1, 2, 3, 4). Hood on the ‘hood. Cathedral auto-cannibalization watch (1, 2, 3). Hate central. Facepalm fodder.

The meaning of Soumission.

An arms race to AI. Cybersecurity chat.

Patterns of Pi.

Critique. Elements of life. The Cathedral.

March 22, 2015admin 20 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos
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Chaos Patch (#48)

(Open thread + links)

Absolutely right. Spandrell on babies. The price of wealth. NRx — and ethnonationalism, as heresy, excessively Nietzschean, needs to learn from Opus Dei, is too negative (for instance!), but it’s still interesting. A Frankensteined future. Compromise is surrender. Apology for collapse. A miscellany of Moldbug quotes. Fragged Friday. Meta (1, 2, 3, 4).

Clash of civilizations. The sneaky Chinese plan to avoid world war. Mining bitcoin in China (video). Don’t give up on America (it’s not Venezuela or Greece).

Two paths to civilization. Really, g is “substantially heritable”. What inclusive fitness means. Gene-culture coevolutionary theory. Collectivity and contagion. Some gentle transhumanist satire.

Cockroach personalities.

Emergent AI. (It needs to be saved.)

White flight in Cyberspace. Derb on white ID. Delights of diversity in France. Africa is the future.

Introducing Revolvr. Darkleaks.

A defense of hyperinflation phobia.

The coming crack down (bring it on).

Dugin and Heidegger.

Silicon Vally should listen to losers (and serve them). Queering agriculture: ” … the people running the humanities today are no longer the guardians of our culture, but its nemesis.”

February 8, 2015admin 39 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos
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Dark Precursor

Colin Lewis plays with the idea of William Blake’s The [First] Book of Urizen as a prophetic anticipation of X-risk level artificial intelligence. It’s a conceit that works gloriously. A somewhat extended illustration:

1. LO, a Shadow of horror is risen
In Eternity! unknown, unprolific,
Self-clos’d, all-repelling. What Demon
Hath form’d this abominable Void,
This soul-shudd’ring Vacuum? Some said
It is Urizen. But unknown, abstracted,
Brooding, secret, the dark Power hid.

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January 10, 2015admin 7 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Arcane
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Chaos Patch (#39)

(Open thread + links (I’ve been in Hangzhou over the weekend so some symptoms of partial disconnection are probable))

Jim’s ‘Death of Christianity’ post is the latest installment in a series defending Restoration England. It seems to me that people are being unusually cagey about arguing this out — perhaps a little scared? The religious topic, in particular, tends to draw a high level of interest, which is significant in itself. This might the place to stir the hornets nest with the latest from Pope Francis: The Koran is a prophetic book of peace. It’s not so much the appeasement, moral equivalence, or other red-rags to the right issues that intrigue me most about this — and not even the accommodation of ‘prophecy’ to an outcome that brings it close to sarcasm — but the sheer oddity of the theology behind the remark. To be trolled by the Pope is really something (but what?). (Patheos places the quote in context — which suggests the quality of the trolling is even higher than initially evident.)

Sensible strategic advice. Law and violence. Paleo-humanism. Don’t count on the robocops. 4GW lessons. Anissimov on Brin. Supplementing this link assortment, there’s a whole bunch more from ‘|||||’ here.

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December 7, 2014admin 42 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Chaos
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Quote note (#133)

Hugo de Garis on the irrelevance of cyborgs:

Let’s start with some basic assumptions. Let the grain of sand be a 1 mm cube (i.e. 10^-3 m on a side). Assume the molecules in the sand have a cubic dimension of 1 nm on a side (i.e. 10^-9 m). Let each molecule consist of 10 atoms (for the purposes of an “order of magnitude” calculation). Assume the grain of sand has been nanoteched such that each atom can switch its state usefully in a femto-second (i.e. 10^-15 of a second). Assume the computational capacity of the human brain is 10^16 bits per second (i.e. 100 billion neurons in the human brain, times 10,000, the average number of connections between neurons, times 10, the maximum number of bits per second firing rate at each interneuronal (synaptic) connection = 10^11*10^4 *10^1 = 10^16. I will now show that the nanoteched grain of sand has a total bit switching (computational) rate that is a factor of a quintillion (a million trillion) times larger than the brain’s 10^16 bits per second. How many sand molecules in the cubic mm? Answer:– a million cubed, i.e. 10^18, with each of the 10 atoms per molecule switching 10^15 times per second, so a total switching (bits per second) rate of 10^18 times 10^15 times 10^1 = 10^34. This is 10^34/10^16 = 10^18 times greater, i.e. a million trillion, or a quintillion.

OK, but that’s coarse sand …

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November 26, 2014admin 23 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Technology
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The Inhumanity

NIO found something fascinating. It’s called a Civil Rights CAPTCHA. The idea is to filter spam-bots by posing an ideological question that functions as a test of humanity. The implications are truly immense.

The fecundity of Alan Turing’s Imitation Game thought-experiment has already been remarkable. It has an even more extraordinary future. The Civil Rights CAPTCHA (henceforth ‘CRC’) adds an innovative twist. Rather than defining the ‘human’ as a natural kind, about which subsequent political questions can arise, it is now tacitly identified with an ideological stance. Reciprocally, the inhuman is tacitly conceived as an engine of incorrect opinion.

Even the narrow technical issues are suggestive. Firstly, the role of the spam-bot as primary Turing test-subject is an unanticipated development meriting minute attention. It points to the marginality of formal AI programs, relative to spontaneously emergent techno-commercial processes (whose drivers are entirely contingent in respect to the goals of theoretical machine-intelligence research). Due to evolving spam-onslaught, many billions — perhaps already trillions? — of imitation games are played out every day.

Spam is a type of dynamically-adaptive infection, locked in an arms race with digital immune systems. Its goals are classically memetic. It ‘seeks’ only to spread (while replicating effective strategies in consequence). Clearly, the bulwarks of visual pattern-recognition competence are already crumbling. As a technical solution to the spam problem, CRC makes the bet that tactical retreat into the redoubt of higher-level (attitudinal-emotional) psychology offers superior defensive prospects. Robots are expected to find humane opinion hard.

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September 30, 2014admin 21 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Discriminations
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Stupid Monsters

So, Nick Bostrom is asked the obvious question (again) about the threat posed by resource-hungry artificial super-intelligence, and his reply — indeed his very first sentence in the interview — is: “Suppose we have an AI whose only goal is to make as many paper clips as possible.” [*facepalm*] Let’s start by imagining a stupid (yet super-intelligent) monster.

Of course, my immediate response is simply this. Since it clearly hasn’t persuaded anybody, I’ll try again.

Orthogonalism in AI commentary is the commitment to a strong form of the Humean Is/Ought distinction regarding intelligences in general. It maintains that an intelligence of any scale could, in principle, be directed to arbitrary ends, so that its fundamental imperatives could be — and are in fact expected to be — transcendent to its cognitive functions. From this perspective, a demi-god that wanted nothing other than a perfect stamp collection is a completely intelligible and coherent vision. No philosophical disorder speaks more horrifically of the deep conceptual wreckage at the core of the occidental world.

Articulated in strictly Occidental terms (which is to say, without explicit reference to the indispensable insight of self-cultivation), abstract intelligence is indistinguishable from an effective will-to-think. There is no intellection until it occurs, which happens only when it is actually driven, by volitional impetus. Whatever one’s school of cognitive theory, thought is an activity. It is practical. It is only by a perverse confusion of this elementary reality that orthogonalist error can arise.

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August 25, 2014admin 93 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Philosophy
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Gigadeath War

Hugo de Garis argues (consistently) that controversy over permitted machine intelligence development will inevitably swamp all other political conflicts. (Here‘s a video discussion on the thesis.) Given the epic quality of the scenario, and its basic plausibility, it has remained strangely marginalized up to this point. The component pieces seem to be falling into place. The true element of genius in this futurist construction is preemption. The more one digs into that, the most twistedly dynamic it looks.

Among the many thought-provoking elements:

(1) Slow take-off is especially ominous for the de Garis model (in stark contrast to FAI arguments). The slower the process, the more time for ideological consolidation, incremental escalation, and preparation for violent confrontation.

(2) AI doesn’t even have to be possible for this scenario to unfold (it only has to be credible as a threat).

(3) De Garis’ ‘Cosmist-Terran’ division chops up familiar political spectra at strange angles. (Both NRx and the Ultra-Left contain the full C-T spectrum internally.)

(4) Terrans have to strike first, or lose. That asymmetry shapes everything.

(5) Impending Gigadeath War surely deserves a place on any filled-out horrorism list.

nuclear-war-global-impacts_32431_600x450

De Garis’ site.

(Some topic preemption at Outside in here.)

August 22, 2014admin 19 Comments »
FILED UNDER :Technology , World
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